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Top 5 Risks You Hadn't Considered in Connected Cars

  • Top 5 Risks You Hadn't Considered in Connected Cars-

    What Do We Do?

    So what do we do? Regulation feels inevitable. Decades after Congress passed the 1966 National Traffic and Motor Vehicle Safety Act, ushering in a wave of new safety improvements, we may once again be in line for a new generation of safety standards. This will not happen overnight, and like many other complex cybersecurity challenges, it will involve multiple parties and will require some serious collaboration. As threat intelligence crowdsourcing takes hold in the security industry, with IT pros sharing vulnerabilities, threats and fixes, the auto industry has followed suit with the recent introduction of the industry's upcoming intelligence sharing and analysis center (ISAC). The goal will be to work together on solutions that could be as revolutionary as the seatbelt.

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Top 5 Risks You Hadn't Considered in Connected Cars

  • 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8
  • Top 5 Risks You Hadn't Considered in Connected Cars-7

    What Do We Do?

    So what do we do? Regulation feels inevitable. Decades after Congress passed the 1966 National Traffic and Motor Vehicle Safety Act, ushering in a wave of new safety improvements, we may once again be in line for a new generation of safety standards. This will not happen overnight, and like many other complex cybersecurity challenges, it will involve multiple parties and will require some serious collaboration. As threat intelligence crowdsourcing takes hold in the security industry, with IT pros sharing vulnerabilities, threats and fixes, the auto industry has followed suit with the recent introduction of the industry's upcoming intelligence sharing and analysis center (ISAC). The goal will be to work together on solutions that could be as revolutionary as the seatbelt.

Connected car security has been a hot topic ever since the experiment in which hackers remotely ran an Internet-connected Jeep off the road. Even if the average driver isn't necessarily scared that the same thing will happen to them, connected automobiles could disrupt our everyday lives in other ways. And, with an estimated 250 million connected cars expected on the road by 2020, these disruptions could be coming sooner than you may think.

Automakers are eager to put Internet connectivity to good use – tracking down stolen vehicles, preprogramming trip routes, and even making driverless cars a full-scale reality — which Tesla is actively working on, having just rolled out its highly anticipated self-driving features. But that doesn't mean there won't also be a few side effects. Richard Kirk, SVP at AlienVault, the Silicon Valley-based provider of unified security management and crowd-sourced threat intelligence, outlines a few scenarios.