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Epic Fail: 5 Reasons Self-Service ITaaS Portals Are Failing

  • Epic Fail: 5 Reasons Self-Service ITaaS Portals Are Failing-

    No Way to Measure Success

    Does your ITaaS portal have fuzzy or non-existent ROI?

    Your IT organization may have invested significant time and money into developing a self-service ITaaS portal for its end users. Once it's done, however, it's not always easy to see if the result was worth the cost. Measurements of success should be scoped at the start of the project. These include everything from key performance indicators (KPI) to subjective input from the user community. Many IT teams don't look hard enough at how a portal's IT services might succeed at removing many previously manual steps for end users. The more an IT team can specify how much time or money is now being saved by users who've since used the portal, the more successful teams will be at gaining budget approval for other, similar IT projects.

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Epic Fail: 5 Reasons Self-Service ITaaS Portals Are Failing

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  • Epic Fail: 5 Reasons Self-Service ITaaS Portals Are Failing-5

    No Way to Measure Success

    Does your ITaaS portal have fuzzy or non-existent ROI?

    Your IT organization may have invested significant time and money into developing a self-service ITaaS portal for its end users. Once it's done, however, it's not always easy to see if the result was worth the cost. Measurements of success should be scoped at the start of the project. These include everything from key performance indicators (KPI) to subjective input from the user community. Many IT teams don't look hard enough at how a portal's IT services might succeed at removing many previously manual steps for end users. The more an IT team can specify how much time or money is now being saved by users who've since used the portal, the more successful teams will be at gaining budget approval for other, similar IT projects.

In the age of cloud computing, much has been made of the changing face of corporate IT. Teams are no longer responsible for just a behind-the-scenes, keep-the-lights-on type of IT service. They now find themselves transforming to be a more customer-facing provider of streamlined IT services to end users. As such, IT as a service (ITaaS) has become a popular choice for closing the service gap between corporate IT and its more successful, public cloud counterparts.

With successful public cloud providers, customers access easy-to-use web portals with useful, self-service menus of available IT services. Corporate ITaaS has the same goal of creating self-service portals — complete with a menu of selectable, automated IT services. It sounds straightforward enough, but attempts at these types of ITaaS portals often end up falling flat. This slideshow shares five reasons why many self-service ITaaS portals just aren't working, as identified by Steve Nassif, senior manager of cloud service management, at Datalink.

About the author: Steve Nassif is Datalink's senior manager of cloud service management. He and his team work closely with midrange and enterprise companies to realize the benefits of cloud computing in their own environments.