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    HTML5 Reaches Mainstream Tipping Point

    While there has been a lot of public gnashing of teeth over HTML5, it turns out developers are already moving in that direction.

    A new survey of 4,043 developers conducted by Kendo UI, a division of Telerik and provider of cross-platform application development tools, finds that the vast majority of developers either already are or soon will be working with HTML5.

    In fact, it appears that most of them couldn’t care less what path giants such as Facebook are pursuing when it comes to HTML5. Most of them are far more concerned about browser fragmentation and a potential controversy between the W3C and the Web HyperText Application Technology Working Group (WHATWG), a consortium of developers calling for a faster pace of HTML innovation.

    HTML5 Reaches Mainstream Tipping Point - slide 1

    Click through for results from an HTML5 adoption survey conducted by Kendo UI, a division of Telerik.

    HTML5 Reaches Mainstream Tipping Point - slide 2

    A staggering percentage.

    HTML5 Reaches Mainstream Tipping Point - slide 3

    Way more than half.

    HTML5 Reaches Mainstream Tipping Point - slide 4

    A tipping point has been reached.

    HTML5 Reaches Mainstream Tipping Point - slide 5

    Path of least resistance.

    HTML5 Reaches Mainstream Tipping Point - slide 6

    ASP.Net remains strong.

    HTML5 Reaches Mainstream Tipping Point - slide 7

    More sound than fury.

    HTML5 Reaches Mainstream Tipping Point - slide 8

    Remains the biggest concern.

    HTML5 Reaches Mainstream Tipping Point - slide 9

    A brewing controversy.

    Mike Vizard
    Michael Vizard is a seasoned IT journalist, with nearly 30 years of experience writing and editing about enterprise IT issues. He is a contributor to publications including Programmableweb, IT Business Edge, CIOinsight and UBM Tech. He formerly was editorial director for Ziff-Davis Enterprise, where he launched the company’s custom content division, and has also served as editor in chief for CRN and InfoWorld. He also has held editorial positions at PC Week, Computerworld and Digital Review.

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