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Essential Elements in Building an Agile Data Center

  • Essential Elements in Building an Agile Data Center-

    Disaster Recovery

    IT pros need to establish a good disaster recovery (DR) plan that includes per-application/VM replication along with simplicity and automation. A plan should categorize applications/VMs according to their business criticality. In the event of a disaster, mission-critical applications need to be up and running in a very short timeframe. This requires that the RPO and RTO of such applications be defined in a granular fashion to meet specific SLAs. Having a high-performance per-application/VM replication capability could be hugely beneficial in getting the critical applications up and running in minutes.

    Additionally, this DR plan should account for the ability to automate workflows such as site failover, failback and planned migrations. Given that a vast majority of applications in an enterprise environment today are virtualized, the DR plan should recommend solutions that natively integrate with recovery tools (such as VMware Site Recovery Manager, etc.) for virtualized servers. Such capability would assist the infrastructure managers to set up and execute DR plans with small (or) negligible recovery windows.

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Essential Elements in Building an Agile Data Center

  • 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7
  • Essential Elements in Building an Agile Data Center-4

    Disaster Recovery

    IT pros need to establish a good disaster recovery (DR) plan that includes per-application/VM replication along with simplicity and automation. A plan should categorize applications/VMs according to their business criticality. In the event of a disaster, mission-critical applications need to be up and running in a very short timeframe. This requires that the RPO and RTO of such applications be defined in a granular fashion to meet specific SLAs. Having a high-performance per-application/VM replication capability could be hugely beneficial in getting the critical applications up and running in minutes.

    Additionally, this DR plan should account for the ability to automate workflows such as site failover, failback and planned migrations. Given that a vast majority of applications in an enterprise environment today are virtualized, the DR plan should recommend solutions that natively integrate with recovery tools (such as VMware Site Recovery Manager, etc.) for virtualized servers. Such capability would assist the infrastructure managers to set up and execute DR plans with small (or) negligible recovery windows.

Today, about 75 percent of all workloads in data centers are virtualized and this number is only expected to grow. The biggest challenge IT admins face is that conventional storage is ill-equipped to deal with virtualization because the storage is built for physical workloads.  

Problems arise as legacy storage, with logical unit numbers (LUNs) and volumes that might house tens or hundreds of individual virtual machines (VMs), causes resident VMs to fight over limited resources. This is a phenomenon called the "noisy neighbor." While one common solution is to throw more high-performance flash storage at the problem, this alone cannot fix the problem. It simply postpones dealing with the underlying problem (LUNs). Costs can spiral out of control as an all-flash storage architecture dedicated to LUNs and volumes does not necessarily overcome the pain points of managing virtual workloads.

While many companies aspire to build cloud-scale infrastructures with agility and automation for diverse virtualized workloads, they have been forced to choose between limited scale-out that requires a large number of disks or expensive and inefficient scale-out. According to Chuck Dubuque, senior director of product and solution marketing for Tintri, five key areas that are critical for successful data center modernization efforts include speed, quality of service (QoS), disaster recovery, predictive data analytics, and manageability at scale.