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Creating an App-Centric Network for the Internet of Things

  • Creating an App-Centric Network for the Internet of Things-

    What Makes IoT Different?

    The IoT extends the end node far beyond the human-centric world to encompass specialized devices with and without human-accessible interfaces. As IoT grows, the need for real-time scalability to handle dynamic traffic bursts also increases. There may be the need to handle very low-bandwidth small data streams – such as a sensor identifier and a status bit on a door sensor, or large high-bandwidth streams – like HD video from a security camera. There is almost always the need for encryption, as well.

    The scope of IoT is huge. In some cases, the end node may be a low-powered embedded microcontroller with sensors, hard wired to an industry network, running 24/7.

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Creating an App-Centric Network for the Internet of Things

  • 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13
  • Creating an App-Centric Network for the Internet of Things-3

    What Makes IoT Different?

    The IoT extends the end node far beyond the human-centric world to encompass specialized devices with and without human-accessible interfaces. As IoT grows, the need for real-time scalability to handle dynamic traffic bursts also increases. There may be the need to handle very low-bandwidth small data streams – such as a sensor identifier and a status bit on a door sensor, or large high-bandwidth streams – like HD video from a security camera. There is almost always the need for encryption, as well.

    The scope of IoT is huge. In some cases, the end node may be a low-powered embedded microcontroller with sensors, hard wired to an industry network, running 24/7.

The Internet of Things (IoT) is not just the connected refrigerator. It's thousands of medical devices in hospitals, smart utility meters, GPS-based location systems, fitness trackers, toll readers, motion detector security cameras, smoke detectors, and last but not least, embedded systems. Each of these IoT end nodes requires connectivity, processing and storage, some local and some in the cloud. This means scalability and application elasticity to adapt to dynamic requirements and ever-changing workloads.

To support and accommodate all the devices, sensors and other network-connected gadgets that will eventually become part of the IoT, network designs will need to adapt and become more application centric, according to KEMP Technologies. From health care to automotive and manufacturing to consumer electronics, the Internet of Things is a quantum revolution in how we think about application data activity. Is your network ready for the application onslaught that's coming?