Beyond Email: 5 Alternative Ways to Fall Victim to Ransomware

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Protecting Yourself from Infected USB Drives

People using USB drives in their organization should be very cautious the next time they consider installing an untested USB device into their computer. Organizations should take additional steps to perform scanning of USB devices to immunize any threats detected. Also, organizations should reconsider even sharing content with others via USB drives – instead, sharing content via the cloud can be effective and more secure than USB sharing with the protection of an effective CASB solution. In this case, if files already encrypted by ransomware are synced to the cloud, they can be easily detected and prevented using behavior anomalies and policy enforcement respectively. Understanding cloud application risks, discovering and analyzing cloud app usage for both sanctioned and unsanctioned apps, gaining control over user interactions with cloud apps, and developing appropriate cloud app policies are all important steps to securing an organization's safety in the cloud.

Ransomware, without a doubt, is dominating the cyber-threat landscape by holding critical systems and data hostage in industries ranging from health care and finance to government and energy. Ransomware is a class of malware that, when distributed to a system, renders victims' systems unusable by encrypting computers and data or by locking applications. The attacker's goal is to blackmail the victim into paying a ransom in exchange for decryption keys, allowing them to regain control of their systems and data.

Most information and reports about ransomware, however, have focused on phishing as a conduit for ransomware delivery and often overlook other distribution methods in use. Attackers are becoming craftier with their methods to spread malware that encrypts files and locks data, blindsiding victims before they even realize they have been attacked.

So while organizations and individuals are performing everyday tasks – like running their businesses in the cloud and using social media – alternative ways to receive ransomware, which don't require victims to open a phishing email, also pose a serious threat. In this slideshow, Aditya Sood, PhD., director of security and Elastica Cloud Threat Labs at Blue Coat, discusses five alternative ways that organizations can fall victim to ransomware and offers advice on how they can protect themselves.


Related Topics : Unisys, Stimulus Package, Security Breaches, Symantec, Electronic Surveillance

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