Why CIOs Need to Prepare for Big Data from Internet of Things

Loraine Lawson
Slide Show

Five Steps to Improve Marketing Effectiveness with Big Data

It’s time to think about how you’ll manage data from the Internet of Things.

I’m not being trendy. I know it seems too new to be possible, but actually the Internet of Things is a simple concept. Sensors + Wi-Fi = Device. It will quickly take root like kudzu, overwhelming your systems, particularly your data systems.

Consider this: Cisco states that what it calls the “Internet of Everything”—people, process, data and things using network connections—will reach an additional $544 billion in profits this year alone, according to CNET. By 2020, the GSM Association’s Connected Life predicts growth to 24 billion connected devices, Wired reports.


The reality is that the Internet of Things actually already exists. Each day, people use wireless sensor devices in cars, on manufacturing floors and even in swimming pool pumps. Several companies offer Internet of Things devices and technology solutions, including Cisco, IBM (it even offers a data solution), Zebra Technologies and start-ups Twine and SmartThings.

As Dr. Seuss might say, “From there to here, from here to there, Internet things are everywhere.” And all of them are sending or using data, and lots of it. “Big data like you've never seen before,” notes InfoWorld writer Bob Violino.

Given the wide use, it will be tempting to leave each department to manage their own Internet-enabled devices within a company, but that’s a mistake for several reasons. Think of these devices more like miniature appliances than your run-of-the-mill automation technology. These items will need security and they’ll produce data that must be managed. Also, you will deal with versioning, stress tests, performance and scalability issues.

In some ways, you’ll need to think through the usual IT problems: security, data integration, quality and governance, and so on. But the Internet of Things will put its own spin on each device.

Gartner contends that IT leaders are a “natural entry point” for the Internet of Things, IT Pro reports. CIOs and other IT leaders need to tackle managing these devices now, before adoption overtakes them.

 "By understanding the various classes of devices that will likely populate the Internet of Things, the CIO will be well-placed to spot additional opportunities or see similarities that business colleagues may overlook," vice president and Gartner Fellow, Stephen Prentice, told IT Pro.

In my next post, I’ll share the unique issues IT must consider as CIOs prepare for the Internet of Things.



Add Comment      Leave a comment on this blog post
Aug 23, 2013 10:48 PM Ishwara Bhat Ishwara Bhat  says:
Great to see that you pointed out. Internet of Things exists. Had been around for at least 10 years. At Honeywell, we had created first concept in 1999 itself. Now the work to be done is on the data analytics. Regarding bringing sensors onto internet I see few challenges which are not readily obvious. It is about interaction between two industries with very different way of functionoing and cultures. More on this here. I wrote it from technical management perspective http://midmanager.com/internet-of-things-control-industry-consumer-industry-how-to-bridge/ Reply

Post a comment

 

 

 

 


(Maximum characters: 1200). You have 1200 characters left.

 

 

Subscribe to our Newsletters

Sign up now and get the best business technology insights direct to your inbox.


 
Resource centers

Business Intelligence

Business performance information for strategic and operational decision-making

SOA

SOA uses interoperable services grouped around business processes to ease data integration

Data Warehousing

Data warehousing helps companies make sense of their operational data


Close
Thanks for your registration, follow us on our social networks to keep up-to-date