App Development: Getting More Complex

Carl Weinschenk
Slide Show

Seven Must-Have Features for Great Mobile Apps

Recent news stories have touched on several issues of extreme importance to the app development community. They focused on the ever-shifting views of the relative merits of different approaches to development, emerging ways of customizing apps based on data gathered about the device’s user and, as always, the status of security.

Growth in the mobile app development sector is expected to continue its healthy path. TechNavio suggests that improved customer engagement and satisfaction will result in a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 13.4 percent between last year and 2019, according to a press release on a new report.

The road won’t be a straight one, however. Observers suggest that the more things evolve, the more complex they will become. Matt Asay at ReadWrite dove into the confusing world of Web versus native versus hybrid app development. This has long been an issue. The short answer hasn’t changed: It’s a case-by-case decision. Each approach has its advantages: Web-based apps can fluidly link to anything on the Internet. Native apps work directly off the mobile devices’ operating system and generally present a better experience. Hybrid apps, as the name implies attempt to offer the best of both worlds. There are no simple answers:

Should you build a native app? Maybe. Should you have a responsive website and/or a rich web app? Maybe. Should you privilege Android's reach in emerging markets or iOS's strength with heavy wallets in established markets? Maybe. Should you build for mobile, glanceable moments? Maybe.

Another trend in the mobile development world is the use of machine learning and context to build apps. Quinton Wall at TechCrunch addressed the issue in his report on Apple’s World Wide Developers’ Conference, which was held earlier this month in San Francisco.

The focus is on what Apple’s new programming language can learn about the owner of a device, and how developers can use that data to customize apps for that person:

Thanks in large part to the ease of learning Swift – as compared to Objective-C -, the open sourcing of core libraries, and the ability for developers to create contextual apps on the latest versions of iOS, the opportunity to create apps, which can utilize the proactive features presented during the keynote, to drive employee productivity increases enterprises will likely accelerate, and expand, their native iOS development plans in the year to come.

Security is always part of the conversation. Tom Foremski at ZDNet writes that the fast pace of app development opens significant vulnerabilities. In order to test an app, he writes, each development team – and there may be several at work simultaneously – needs a copy of the production data. This can spell disaster, especially if there is pressure to get the app out the door. Foremski offers a workaround, but the scenario suggests just how dicey app development security can be.

Application development has always been a fun and chaotic category. Those attributes show no signs of fading.

Carl Weinschenk covers telecom for IT Business Edge. He writes about wireless technology, disaster recovery/business continuity, cellular services, the Internet of Things, machine-to-machine communications and other emerging technologies and platforms. He also covers net neutrality and related regulatory issues. Weinschenk has written about the phone companies, cable operators and related companies for decades and is senior editor of Broadband Technology Report. He can be reached at and via twitter at @DailyMusicBrk.

Add Comment      Leave a comment on this blog post
Jun 30, 2015 11:31 PM Darshan Thakker Darshan Thakker  says:
In between more competition and high user-expectations, app development become more complex. Reply
Jul 1, 2015 12:22 AM Bin Sand Bin Sand  says:
Really informative blog. I am an iOS app developer and I have developed more than 50 apps till today with the help of Native app development platforms as well as Cross Platform app development tools. Frankly speaking, I like native app development platforms more compared to Cross platforms. I have developed apps with Phonegap, Telerik, App Builder, Configure.IT and many more. As per my experience, configure.IT is the best because of the following features of this tool, Drag & Drop Facility App Development without coding One Click API Connect You can directly use .PSD file for UI purpose, there is no need to design UI manually. For more details about this too, visit: Reply
Jul 7, 2015 5:01 AM Daria Daria  says:
Update Strategy to Boost App Downloads Recent studies in the mobile market have shown that frequent updates of published applications significantly increase the rate of download. What else do you need to know about periodic updates and performance of your app? Reply
Jul 31, 2015 3:03 AM Ashutosh Porwal Ashutosh Porwal  says:
Hi Carl, I am really grateful to being a part of your regular readers. I’m almost every week surrounding here. I did love to research about my mobile app development and i totally agree with your view point. Before joining mobile application development my life is going easy but after in app development life is little bit tricky. I have been working in app development from last 3 years and i learn a lot with lot of coding researching, logic and coding standard and finally i realize its too much complex rather than PHP development! Have a nice day! Thanks, Ashutosh Reply
Dec 18, 2015 1:32 AM markkessler markkessler  says:
Hi carl, I am happy to know these points about mobile app development... Thanks Reply
Jan 5, 2016 2:22 AM mehaklakhani mehaklakhani  says:
My friend is chasing down the mobile app development company for his new exercises. He has limited spending arrangement for these endeavors. Reply

Post a comment





(Maximum characters: 1200). You have 1200 characters left.



Subscribe to our Newsletters

Sign up now and get the best business technology insights direct to your inbox.