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Four Ways of Thinking That Stifle Company Innovation

  • Four Ways of Thinking That Stifle Company Innovation-
    The organizational design and management theories that gave rise to the dominance of industrial scale and efficiency in production assembly lines still dominate management practices today. And generally, the bigger the company the more the focus is on efficiency, scale, and low-variance operational excellence. The culture, behaviors, processes, measurements, rewards, and tolerance for failure needed to drive operational excellence are fundamentally different from those needed to create innovation, which requires an emphasis on exploration and invention.

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Four Ways of Thinking That Stifle Company Innovation

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  • Four Ways of Thinking That Stifle Company Innovation-2
    The organizational design and management theories that gave rise to the dominance of industrial scale and efficiency in production assembly lines still dominate management practices today. And generally, the bigger the company the more the focus is on efficiency, scale, and low-variance operational excellence. The culture, behaviors, processes, measurements, rewards, and tolerance for failure needed to drive operational excellence are fundamentally different from those needed to create innovation, which requires an emphasis on exploration and invention.

Too many companies are anti-innovation without even realizing it. That’s the conclusion drawn by Ed Hess, a professor of business administration at the University of Virginia’s Darden Graduate School of Business and co-author, along with Jeanne Liedtka, of The Physics of Business Growth: Mindsets, System, and Processes.” In order to stifle what's stifling innovation, Hess advises that companies dump these four entrenched ways of thinking.

Too many companies are anti-innovation without even realizing it. That’s the conclusion drawn by Ed Hess, a professor of business administration at the University of Virginia’s Darden Graduate School of Business and co-author, along with Jeanne Liedtka, of The Physics of Business Growth: Mindsets, System, and Processes.” In order to stifle what's stifling innovation, Hess advises that companies dump these four entrenched ways of thinking.