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Top Five Privacy Issues Organizations Must Tackle

  • Top Five Privacy Issues Organizations Must Tackle

    Top Five Privacy Issues Organizations Must Tackle-

    Regulatory changes should not distract privacy officers from pursuing their strategies, because most regulatory changes will only have a mid- to long-term effect. Absent of any specific laws or regulatory guidance, organizations must interpret existing, generic privacy legislation for emerging technologies like smart meters, indoor positioning, facial recognition on smartphones correlated to photo databases, vehicle and device locators, presence detection, body scanners, and others.

    Monitoring of regulatory changes and, consequently, adjusting the organization’s privacy strategy are important tasks, but they should consume more than five to 10 percent of the privacy officer’s time.

    Mr. Casper said: “The remaining 15 to 50 percent of the privacy officer's time should be spent executing the privacy program, managing relations, steering the privacy organization, reviewing applications, revising policies, document controls, draft privacy terms for contracts, consulting with legal, responding to queries, following up on incidents and supervising the privacy training program.”

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Top Five Privacy Issues Organizations Must Tackle

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    Regulatory changes should not distract privacy officers from pursuing their strategies, because most regulatory changes will only have a mid- to long-term effect. Absent of any specific laws or regulatory guidance, organizations must interpret existing, generic privacy legislation for emerging technologies like smart meters, indoor positioning, facial recognition on smartphones correlated to photo databases, vehicle and device locators, presence detection, body scanners, and others.

    Monitoring of regulatory changes and, consequently, adjusting the organization’s privacy strategy are important tasks, but they should consume more than five to 10 percent of the privacy officer’s time.

    Mr. Casper said: “The remaining 15 to 50 percent of the privacy officer's time should be spent executing the privacy program, managing relations, steering the privacy organization, reviewing applications, revising policies, document controls, draft privacy terms for contracts, consulting with legal, responding to queries, following up on incidents and supervising the privacy training program.”

Data breaches, cloud computing, location-based services and regulatory changes will force virtually all organizations to review, and at least half of all organizations to also revise, their current privacy policies before year-end 2012, according to Gartner, Inc. These issues will dominate the privacy officer’s agenda for the next two years.

“In 2010, organizations saw new threats to personal data and privacy, while budgets for privacy protection remained under pressure,” said Carsten Casper, research director at Gartner. “Throughout 2011 and 2012, privacy programs will remain chronically underfunded, requiring privacy officers to build and maintain strong relationships with corporate counsel, lines of business, HR, IT security, IT operations and application development teams. An established relationship with regulatory authorities and the privacy advocacy community will also be an advantage to them.”

Gartner has identified the top five issues that privacy officers must pay particular attention to in 2011 and 2012.

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