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3: Privacy

  • 3: Privacy-
    Just one of those, RocketLawyer.com CEO Charles Moore suggests, may be maintaining confidential or other sensitive information "in the cloud." As long as your practices are clearly outlined both in your agreements with customers and in your agreements with your service providers, and everyone is on the same page regarding how that information is handled, there should not be a problem.
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3: Privacy

  • 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7
  • 3: Privacy-4
    Just one of those, RocketLawyer.com CEO Charles Moore suggests, may be maintaining confidential or other sensitive information "in the cloud." As long as your practices are clearly outlined both in your agreements with customers and in your agreements with your service providers, and everyone is on the same page regarding how that information is handled, there should not be a problem.
BentleyAs cloud computing has gained acceptance in different markets and in so many parts of the enterprise, experts have raised several different questions that those contemplating making use of the cloud need to address. They run the gamut, from "how do you prove compliance when you don't have access to the logs maintained by a service provider?" to "how do you deal with e-discovery" or "is anything stored in the cloud still considered private?

Culling from the dozens of blog posts and interviews IT Business Edge contributors have done on the subject, our Lora Bentley shares six different pointers that experts such as Proskauer Rose's Nolan Goldberg and Transworld Data CEO Mary Shacklett have given for cloud compliance. Though there are certainly more specific requirements for employing the cloud in certain industries that are highly regulated, these six tips are a good place to start.