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Redefining Enterprise BYOD: Meeting Tomorrow's Demands

  • Redefining Enterprise BYOD: Meeting Tomorrow's Demands-

    Why Enterprise BYOD Must Change

    Click through for more on how/why enterprise mobility must change based on evidence of what has already worked and what has not during the first phase of mobile consumerization of the enterprise, as identified by David Lavenda, vice president of product strategy at harmon.ie.

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Redefining Enterprise BYOD: Meeting Tomorrow's Demands

  • 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8
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    Redefining Enterprise BYOD: Meeting Tomorrow's Demands-1

    Why Enterprise BYOD Must Change

    Click through for more on how/why enterprise mobility must change based on evidence of what has already worked and what has not during the first phase of mobile consumerization of the enterprise, as identified by David Lavenda, vice president of product strategy at harmon.ie.

Despite years of discussions on enterprise mobility and BYOD, there are very few real business use cases that demonstrate real ROI. While we have much to accomplish in our quest for the mobile enterprise, many lessons have already been learned; lessons we can apply moving forward.

First of all, we need to redefine what we mean by "enterprise mobility." Yesterday's "BYOD" was about giving employees physical, mobile devices. Today's enterprise mobility is about actually giving them the tools they need to be productive. This goes beyond contacts, email, and calendaring capabilities; it focuses on creating a coherent work environment for employees so they have access to information they need and are able to cut through the jungle of overwhelming data. In this slideshow, David Lavenda, vice president of product strategy at harmon.ie, explores how/why enterprise mobility must change based on evidence of what has already worked and what has not during the first phase of mobile consumerization of the enterprise.

David Lavenda is vice president of product strategy, harmon.ie. For the past 20 years, David has served as an executive for a number of high-tech companies. After completing a undergraduate degree in physics, advanced studies in electrical engineering, and an MBA in marketing, David co-founded Business Layers, an identity management company, serving as VP marketing and product strategy from its inception until the company's successful sale five years later.