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Phishing 101: Beware and Prepare this Holiday Season

  • Phishing 101: Beware and Prepare this Holiday Season-

    Phishing Signs – Design Changes

    Emails that are formatted differently than normal are also warning signs. It's one thing for a website or logo to get a facelift, but it's another for a company that would normally have purchase information in the body of the email to put it in a .zip attachment. Additionally, if taken to a website, certain nuances of a site, like images not loading and boxes not lining up, should raise red flags. And while a website may look similar to what you normally see, it's a good habit to look at the website address in the address bar and make sure you are at the correct website.

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Phishing 101: Beware and Prepare this Holiday Season

  • 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12
  • Phishing 101: Beware and Prepare this Holiday Season-5

    Phishing Signs – Design Changes

    Emails that are formatted differently than normal are also warning signs. It's one thing for a website or logo to get a facelift, but it's another for a company that would normally have purchase information in the body of the email to put it in a .zip attachment. Additionally, if taken to a website, certain nuances of a site, like images not loading and boxes not lining up, should raise red flags. And while a website may look similar to what you normally see, it's a good habit to look at the website address in the address bar and make sure you are at the correct website.

With the holiday shopping season upon us, the FBI is warning consumers to be on the lookout for cyber scams and phishing attacks. Why such concern? According to research, phishing remains a popular and surprisingly effective attack method — in fact, 23 percent of recipients open phishing messages and 11 percent click on attachments.

Unfortunately, phishing campaigns come in many different shapes and sizes. While some are obvious and indiscriminate, luring only the most susceptible of victims (like that long-lost uncle who just needs your routing number to give you $100,000), others are more poised and targeted, only interested in targeting those with big bank accounts or holders of confidential company documents.

In this slideshow, Jon French, security analyst, AppRiver, breaks down what consumers and organizations need to know about phishing scams in order to protect themselves and their networks, this holiday season and beyond.