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Desktop Virtualization Trends in Health Care

  • Desktop Virtualization Trends in Health Care

    Desktop Virtualization Trends in Health Care-

    The combined use of single sign-on (SSO) and strong authentication technology in both SBC and SHVD environments is increasing, with 45 percent of organizations using SBC today indicating that they use SSO and strong authentication and 48 percent using SHVD today stating that they use both technologies.

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Desktop Virtualization Trends in Health Care

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  • Desktop Virtualization Trends in Health Care-5

    The combined use of single sign-on (SSO) and strong authentication technology in both SBC and SHVD environments is increasing, with 45 percent of organizations using SBC today indicating that they use SSO and strong authentication and 48 percent using SHVD today stating that they use both technologies.

Imprivata, a leading global provider of health care IT security solutions, recently announced its "2013 Desktop Virtualization Trends in Healthcare" report, the company’s third-annual survey about the adoption rates and benefits of desktop virtualization and cloud-based applications in health care. According to the study, the proliferation of desktop virtualization in health care continues to increase, with the use of server-hosted virtual desktops (SHVD) up 39 percent and the use of server-based computing (SBC) up 23 percent from last year’s survey. The study also indicates that a mixed use of both SBC and SHVD is becoming more commonplace, with 49 percent of respondents indicating that they are using both technologies today (compared with 23 percent from the 2012 survey).

In addition to desktop virtualization, the Imprivata survey also asked health care organizations about current and planned adoption of cloud computing. The results indicate that the adoption of cloud-based applications and services is increasing more rapidly than expected, with 30 percent of survey respondents stating that they use cloud computing today (up from nine percent from the 2012 survey). In particular, storing protected health information (PHI) in the cloud is becoming more commonplace, with 40 percent of respondents that use cloud services indicating that they store PHI in the cloud today (up from nine percent from the 2012 survey).