dcsimg

5 Recommendations to Secure the Internet of Things

  • 5 Recommendations to Secure the Internet of Things-

    IoT Security Vulnerability

    In 15 years, there will be many instances of IoT that we haven't even thought of yet. In fact, this is quite likely in a world that will have 10 to 100 times more Internet-connected devices than there are connected humans. Hundreds of billions of machines will be sensing, processing, and transmitting data without direct human control or intervention.

    Even today, we're not successfully securing connected devices from attacks. Point-of-sale machines, elevators, HVAC systems, light-rail transit, and commercial aircraft have all become connected by converged IP-based networks, and now share a common trait: They've all been hacked.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8

5 Recommendations to Secure the Internet of Things

  • 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8
  • 5 Recommendations to Secure the Internet of Things-2

    IoT Security Vulnerability

    In 15 years, there will be many instances of IoT that we haven't even thought of yet. In fact, this is quite likely in a world that will have 10 to 100 times more Internet-connected devices than there are connected humans. Hundreds of billions of machines will be sensing, processing, and transmitting data without direct human control or intervention.

    Even today, we're not successfully securing connected devices from attacks. Point-of-sale machines, elevators, HVAC systems, light-rail transit, and commercial aircraft have all become connected by converged IP-based networks, and now share a common trait: They've all been hacked.

A reliance on passwords to prevent attackers from accessing systems, devices, and applications is outdated and ineffective. Attackers typically count on users implementing password-based security protocols, which opens the door to attacks — such as Trojan viruses, phishing, and man-in-the-middle — that take advantage of vulnerabilities. Attackers have evolved from simply wanting to achieve notoriety to becoming sophisticated thieves who steal personally identifiable information (PII) — such as financial and health care records and account numbers — to targeting the rapidly developing Internet of Things (IoT) market, where a hack becomes more personal and potentially life-threatening.

In this slideshow, Phil Montgomery, chief product officer at Identiv, will provide five recommendations to mitigate risk and maintain a strong security posture in this ever-growing connected world.