dcsimg

10 Bad Habits that Should Be Banned from the Workplace

  • 10 Bad Habits that Should Be Banned from the Workplace-

    Don't Skimp on Vacation Time

    A survey for the career website Glassdoor found that U.S. employees use only 51 percent of their eligible paid vacation time and paid time off, according to a recent survey of 2,300 workers who receive paid vacation. Even more frightening, 61 percent of Americans work while they are on vacation, despite complaints from family members, and one in four report being contacted by a colleague about a work-related matter while taking time off, while one-in-five have been contacted by their boss.

    Instead:

    Plan your vacations, take them, and enjoy yourself. Give yourself and your teammates permission to unplug.

    Why?

    You need to refresh and revitalize to be more effective. And, your family will love you for it. According to John De Graaf, who made a documentary about overworked Americans called "Running Out of Time," there is a high cost to not taking vacation. "Women who don't take regular vacations are anywhere from two to eight times more likely to suffer from depression, and have a 50 percent higher chance of heart disease," he says. "For men, the risk of death from a heart attack goes up a third."

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12

10 Bad Habits that Should Be Banned from the Workplace

  • 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12
  • 10 Bad Habits that Should Be Banned from the Workplace-8

    Don't Skimp on Vacation Time

    A survey for the career website Glassdoor found that U.S. employees use only 51 percent of their eligible paid vacation time and paid time off, according to a recent survey of 2,300 workers who receive paid vacation. Even more frightening, 61 percent of Americans work while they are on vacation, despite complaints from family members, and one in four report being contacted by a colleague about a work-related matter while taking time off, while one-in-five have been contacted by their boss.

    Instead:

    Plan your vacations, take them, and enjoy yourself. Give yourself and your teammates permission to unplug.

    Why?

    You need to refresh and revitalize to be more effective. And, your family will love you for it. According to John De Graaf, who made a documentary about overworked Americans called "Running Out of Time," there is a high cost to not taking vacation. "Women who don't take regular vacations are anywhere from two to eight times more likely to suffer from depression, and have a 50 percent higher chance of heart disease," he says. "For men, the risk of death from a heart attack goes up a third."

As technology has evolved and more and more work is completed using computers, many workers have found themselves in sedentary office jobs. Leigh Stringer, author of "The Healthy Workplace," says it's not that we aren't working hard, but that "what our minds and bodies need at a basic level is in conflict with our work style. We are so focused on work, on getting things done, that we've changed the way we eat, move and sleep in a way that is actually counter-productive."

According to Stringer, taking care of worker health and wellbeing is one of the most effective ways to increase employee productivity and engagement. As an example, think back to a night when you got a full night's sleep and compare that to a night when you stayed out a bit too late with friends. How did you feel the morning after your night with friends? Probably not bright-eyed and bushy tailed, ready to take on the challenges of the day. It's important to put your health first, as everything hinges on that baseline.  

So what are some of those unhealthy habits that we need to break? In this slideshow, Ms. Stringer offers up a comprehensive list of the "don'ts," with suggestions on what to do instead.