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Infosys Visa Fraud Will Be Thrust Into National Media Spotlight Tomorrow Morning

Don Tennant

In my April 5 post, "Who Will Infosys Throw Under the Bus in Visa Fraud Case?," I wrote that Infosys was going to have to deal with a major media outlet exposing its shameless behavior, and I mentioned I had a hunch it would happen sooner rather than later. "Sooner" will come just one week later, on tomorrow morning's "CBS This Morning" broadcast. Senior correspondent John Miller will bring the story of Infosys employee and whistleblower Jay Palmer, and the federal criminal investigation that Palmer's case spawned, to millions of households and a mainstream audience that up until now have been in the dark, where Infosys had dearly hoped they'd remain.

 

The broadcast will come 18 months and a day after Palmer filed his now-famous whistleblower report, and Miller is the ideal broadcast journalist to bring the tale of Palmer's ordeal, and Infosys's actions, to the public at large. Miller, of course, is the journalist who in May 1998, when he was with ABC News, interviewed Osama bin Laden in Afghanistan. He left ABC in January 2003 to enter public service, and among the positions he held over the next eight years were Bureau Chief of the Los Angeles Police Department's Counter-Terrorism and Criminal Intelligence Bureau; Assistant Director for Public Affairs at the FBI; and Associate Deputy Director of National Intelligence for Analytic Transformation and Technology. He returned to broadcast journalism in November of last year, landing at CBS News. So Miller has the government credentials, experience and journalistic prowess to have recognized the significance of the Infosys visa fraud story.

 

To appreciate the value of Miller's reporting and the stage that is being set by the high-profile coverage of the story by CBS News, consider this excerpt from my aforementioned post from last week:

As the U.S. government wraps up its criminal investigation of the rampant visa fraud made public by Infosys employee and whistleblower Jay Palmer, very high-profile mainstream media coverage is likely to blow the lid off of Infosys' arrogant public dismissal of the government's case in the very near future. When the heat in the Infosys kitchen gets unbearably hot as a result of the case suddenly being thrust into the media spotlight, it will be interesting to watch the finger-pointing and blame-shifting begin in earnest. [T]hings are going to get very ugly, very quickly, when Infosys' outrageous actions are exposed by a high-profile mainstream media outlet. It's only a matter of time, and I have a hunch that it's going to be sooner rather than later. And when it happens, it will be fascinating to see how Infosys handles it. It will be equally fascinating to see who's thrown under the bus when the feds make it clear that denial is a bus ticket to indictment.

The timing of Miller's report is impeccable. On Friday, Infosys will report its quarterly earnings, and the company's top executives will have to answer analysts' questions in the quarterly earnings call. One can only imagine what will be happening in the C-suites of Infosys tomorrow morning. Hold on to your seats, because anyone who follows this story from here on out is in for a wild ride.


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