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Paul Mah Is Voice of Experience on SMB Beat

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One of the things that troubles me about my job here at IT Business Edge is my non-techie background. I've always been a journalist. I've never written a budget, overseen a software implementation or done any of the tasks that are old hat to some of my readers. While we journalists are (in theory) pretty good at learning and then writing about a variety of topics, most of us would feel better if we had direct experience with our subject matter.

 

It's especially disconcerting when working for a trade publication, because you know some of your readers are experts. The narrow nature of the industry I covered at my last gig (automated teller machines, with a dash of broader electronic payments) helped. But here, I cover such a broad spectrum of tech topics, I feel out of my element with disconcerting frequency.

 

I know, have some cheese with that whine. Actually, all of this angst is a preamble to my letting you know that there's a new blogger on the SMB beat. Earlier this week, IT Business Edge welcomed Paul Mah, who has gotten his hands dirty as a programmer, system administrator and system analyst. He's crawled around under desks and managed some good-sized networks. Readers, he knows his stuff. As you'll see from his bio, he's an instructor at Republic Polytechnic in Singapore and a contributor to such well-regarded tech sites as Ars Technica and TechRepublic.

 

When Paul writes, as he did on Tuesday, that "a full-fledged SAN makes no sense to an organization with just two dozen staffers," he's speaking from the voice of experience. He's already turned in a couple of smart posts.

 

The downside to this: I will no longer cover SMB issues in the same dedicated way. That's not to say an occasional SMB-oriented post won't appear in my other blogs, Straight to the Source and The Visible Enterprise.

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