Top Security Threats for 2013

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4G-driven mobility and BYOD compliance will cause security and audit nightmares. The availability of near-desktop speed on laptops, tablets and smartphones will lead to a larger number of mobile BYOD users accessing sensitive and regulated corporate data. Organizations that do not have effective management and controls in place for BYOD and related WiFi networks and VPNs, along with their related digital certificates and encryption keys, will find themselves spiraling into a security and compliance nightmare that will result in breaches, fines and brand damage.

Venafi, a market leader in enterprise key and certificate management (EKCM) solutions, recently released its cybersecurity and vulnerability predictions for 2013. At the top of its predictions list is that organized cyber criminals and hackers will leverage digital-certificate-based attacks to infect enterprise IT systems with state-developed malware such as Flame and Stuxnet. The results will impact business operations adversely, and could lead to data breaches and brand damage. 

"Many pundits, leading media outlets and even some security experts are reporting that enterprises needn't be overly concerned about Flame and Stuxnet-style malware, citing the fact that they were executed by well-funded government intelligence and military groups whose targets were hostile nation-states and not businesses," said Venafi CEO Jeff Hudson. "However, our view is that companies should be concerned, as the tools and techniques used to execute these types of attacks are, unfortunately, now in the hands of common criminals and rogue entities. In the coming year, such attacks are likely to increase, especially against enterprises, and are likely to result in major data breaches, unplanned outages and significant disruptions to businesses."

Venafi bases its predictions on hard evidence, not conjecture. In 2012, Chevron (No. 3 in the Fortune 500 rankings) admitted that it had found the Stuxnet malware in its systems. Chevron has since publicly stated that it does not believe the U.S. government realizes how far and wide the malware has spread. Although reports indicate that the incident did not cause damage or result in data loss, it proves that digital-certificate-based attacks are no longer hypothetical or confined to state vs. state cyber war scenarios.

In addition to predicting increased trends in enterprise attacks, Venafi has also researched the overall enterprise security landscape and developed a number of other predictions highlighted in this slideshow.


Related Topics : Unisys, Stimulus Package, Security Breaches, Symantec, Electronic Surveillance

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