The Ten Commandments of BYOD

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Nothing breeds noncompliance faster than complexity. Once you identify devices to enroll, your BYOD program should leverage technology that allows for a simple, low touch way for users to enroll. The process should be simple, secure, and configure the device at the same time.

In a perfect scenario, users should be able to follow an email link or text that leads to an MDM profile being created on their device — including accepting the ever-important AUA.

Instructions should help existing users enroll in the BYOD program. We do recommend existing users clear their ActiveSync accounts so that you can isolate and manage corporate data on the device. New devices should start with a fresh profile.

From an IT perspective, you want the ability to enroll existing devices in bulk or for users to self-enroll their devices. You also need to authenticate employees with a basic authentication process such as a one-time passcode or use existing corporate directories such as Active Directory/LDAP. Any new devices trying to access corporate resources should be quarantined and IT notified. This provides IT with flexibility to block or initiate a proper enrollment workflow if approved, ensuring compliance with corporate policies.

The rapid proliferation of mobile devices entering the workplace feels like divine intervention to many IT leaders. It’s as if a voice boomed down from the mountain ordering all of the employees you support to procure as many devices as possible and connect them to corporate services en masse. Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) was born and employees followed with fervor.

There’s no sense pretending it isn’t happening or saying, “We don’t let our employees do that.” The truth is, they’re doing it already and will continue to burrow noncompliant devices into your network with or without your permission. Forrester’s study of U.S. information workers revealed that 37 percent are doing something with technology before formal permissions or policies are instituted.  Further, a Gartner CIO survey determined that 80 percent of employees will be eligible to use their own equipment with employee data on board by 2016.

This raises the inevitable question: How will you support work force desire to use personal apps and devices while allowing them to be productive in a secure environment that protects corporate data? The Ten Commandments of BYOD, developed by MaaS360, show you how to create a peaceful, secure and productive mobile environment.


Related Topics : HTC, Broadcom, Nortel, Data Loss Prevention, Mobile Search

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