The Risks versus Benefits of Cloud Computing

Share  
1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  |  7  |  8  |  9
Previous Next

Click through for findings on how IT Risk Management fits into the overall program for managing risk in the enterprise.

Topics : A Big Market for Big Data Jobs, Midmarket CIO, IT Management Automation, SharePoint, Technology Markets


A new survey from the Information Systems Audit and Control Association (ISACA) reveals that almost half of the IT professionals surveyed say the risks of cloud computing outweigh the benefits.

ISACA’s first annual survey shows that more than 45 percent  of respondents feel the risks of cloud computing outweigh the major benefits offered by the technology. However, 38 percent of the 1,809 members of ISACA surveyed felt that the risks and benefits of cloud computing were equally balanced. Some 17 percent felt that the benefits outweigh the risks.

For CTOs, these results may cast some doubt on where cloud computing sits in your organization, as many IT professionals are still on the fence about cloud computing. Some may see those numbers as good news, while others may feel that those numbers justify their resistance to a shift in the cloud.

For cloud service providers, those numbers actually have a different meaning. A quick interpretation of the results shows that 55 percent of IT professionals will consider cloud computing as a viable option for IT operations, creating a significant opportunity for the purveyors of cloud technologies. On the other hand, the remaining 45 percent may not be ready to adopt the technology, but with a little persuasion and facts, those naysayers may become amiable to the benefits of cloud computing.

What types of cloud computing initiatives will gain ground in today’s enterprises? The numbers make things a little vague. Although the majority of the respondents indicate that cloud computing is acceptable, only 10 percent of the respondents said their organizations plan to employ cloud computing solutions for mission-critical IT services, while 26 percent have no plans to use cloud computing at all.

Some 18 percent have not yet established any plans to implement cloud computing, while 15 percent of the respondents intend to limit cloud computing to non-mission-critical services. When it comes down to it, only a quarter of the respondent have any plans to use cloud computing.

Those numbers may not offer a lot of comfort for those looking to move to the cloud, as it looks like they will still have to be trail-blazing pioneers for a few more years.

 

More Slideshows

GlassdoorNetworkMistakes0x Six Networking Mistakes Job Seekers Often Make

If you've been spending hours networking but don't feel that efforts have produced positive results, it's possible that you're making some very common networking mistakes. ...  More >>

Global8-290x195 Five Disruptive Forces Changing the Role of the Systems Integrator

The cloud is transforming the SI focus from implementation/customization to long-term business solutions that deliver the agile, future-proof technology roadmaps today's C-level executives demand. ...  More >>

Building5-190x128 The 10 Fastest Growing IT Job Markets in the U.S.

Where are these jobs being creating? It might surprise you to know that many of the jobs are appearing in the South and Southeastern U.S. ...  More >>

Subscribe to our Newsletters

Sign up now and get the best business technology insights direct to your inbox.