Contract Negotiation Strategy: Waste Less Time and Get Better Deals - Slide 19

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Executing with Confidence

Don't be afraid to ask for advice. Others have negotiated similar deals, often with the same people. Find out what works and what doesn't. Ask for advice as to how to craft the engagement. Ask your legal team for help.

Also, consider using a specialist. You wouldn't get heart surgery from an engineer, yet people seem to have no problem sending an engineer who has never negotiated before in as a lead negotiator. Like doctors, attorneys have specialties. Make sure your team is experienced.

Negotiations are hard. We don’t do them often and, as a result, we rarely do them well. We often leave the negotiation table feeling like we did poorly or that the other side took advantage of us. In “Negotiating a Contract: How to Waste Less Time and Get Better Deals,” Rob Enderle looks at contract negotiation as a skill and provides strategies that have proven to result in more favorable deals, less chance of litigation and better overall outcomes.

We’ve highlighted these contract negotiation strategies in this slideshow.


Related Topics : A Big Market for Big Data Jobs, Midmarket CIO, IT Management Automation, SharePoint, Technology Markets

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