How Self-Encrypting SSDs Enhance Data Security

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Improving Data Security by Industry

Many industries can benefit from SSD’s data security and accelerated performance, including...

Insurance offices

  • Data to protect: Customer identifying information and claims; claim history software
  • Programs to speed up: Microsoft® Office®, customer relationship management (CRM) software, databases

Medical offices

  • Data to protect: Electronic medical records and billing information
  • Programs to speed up: Microsoft Office, practice management and medical records software, medical technology applications

Law firms

  • Data to protect: Case history, evidence, contracts, and client information
  • Programs to speed up: Microsoft® Office®, case and practice management software

Financial and accounting firms

  • Data to protect: Tax, income, and personal identification information
  • Programs to speed up: Microsoft® Office®, accounting software, QuickBooks®, CRM, databases

Any data stored on businesses' systems is an asset but it's also a liability. Stored on nearly every computer and/or server across a variety of industries, data is not just vulnerable in the event of accidental loss, it's also a high-value target for hackers and data thieves, who want everything from personal identification numbers and customer payment information, to contact lists and intellectual property. While improving data security requires extra precautions, the good news is that it doesn't have to be hard, expensive, or interrupt the user experience.

The best, yet often overlooked, step in protecting data stored on laptops, desktops and/or servers is encryption at the hardware level on the device's storage drive. Why? New systems often come with low-grade pre-installed hard drives which often lack encryption technology. If the hard drive does offer encryption, it's typically software-based, which is one of the weakest forms of encryption. Software-based encryption can also slow down system performance, while still leaving data at risk of being compromised.

The bottom line: If you needed someone to protect you, you'd rather have a strong, muscular person than a skinny bodyguard. When it comes to data security, the choice is similar – hardware-based encryption is a much stronger and more reliable option for protecting data than software-based encryption or, worst case scenario, no encryption at all. In this slideshow, Jonathan Weech, senior worldwide product manager, Crucial, takes a closer look at how self-encrypting SSDs enhance data security strategies.

 

Related Topics : Unisys, Stimulus Package, Security Breaches, Symantec, Electronic Surveillance

 
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