Five Steps to Integrate SAP into Your Enterprise Defense Framework

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DLP Processes

Extend Existing Data Loss Prevention (DLP) Processes to SAP

Data loss prevention (DLP) is a rule-based security solution that examines file contents and prevents confidential or critical information from leaving the corporate perimeter. When configured effectively, a DLP solution can monitor user activity, restrict confidentially classified information from being exported on a USB stick, etc. SAP contains a lot of sensitive information that should never leave its systems, (e.g., password hashes or certain compliance-restricted data). Unfortunately, DLP policies are often not integrated with SAP processes.

While companies typically invest heavily in technologies that protect them from external security threats, internal violations often pose an even greater risk, as they can go unnoticed for extended periods of time. This problem is worsened when temporary contractors working on key projects have access to sensitive data in SAP. With that access, it becomes very easy for an employee or a contractor to download massive amounts of sensitive information in a matter of minutes. By extending the existing DLP framework to SAP, enterprises can prevent potential malicious or accidental data loss and identify possible inside threats.

In an age where digitizing information is the norm, organizations large and small rely on a myriad of applications, systems, and tools to create, collaborate, analyze, and report large volumes of data critical to the success of their businesses.  One such tool, SAP, is used by a remarkable 282,000 customers around the world to run their businesses.

In addition to being an enterprise resource planning (ERP) tool, SAP is also a primary storage vault for a vast amount of sensitive and business-critical data. The data stored in SAP ranges from personally identifiable information (PII) such as Social Security numbers and financial metrics (such as unreleased quarterly results) to bill of material (BOM) information – often related to products that are subject to export control regulations (EAR and ITAR) and trade secrets.

SAP represents a mission-critical piece of IT infrastructure companies spend a lot of time and effort protecting, but many often fail to integrate SAP and its sensitive data into their overall data protection strategy. A comprehensive enterprise defense model is a key requirement in today’s age of digitized data, and ERP software should be an incremental part of that ecosystem. In this slideshow, SECUDE highlights five steps organizations should take to ensure SAP is integrated in their security framework.

 

Related Topics : Unisys, Stimulus Package, Security Breaches, Symantec, Electronic Surveillance

 
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