Five Insights for Building Trust in the Cloud

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What's the issue? continued

Unfortunately, these fears and IT's perceived need to retain physical controls over its environment can increase an organization's risk rather than mitigating it. Within many organizations, when business units that want to use cloud computing hear "no" from IT, they simply go off and procure the service themselves. This not only extends the organization's IT environment without the right protections in place, but it also takes cloud computing into the shadows where IT can neither anticipate nor address the resulting risks.

IT must shift its focus from saying "no" to saying "yes" in a way that adds value to the business and protects it from mounting cybersecurity risks. Developing a cloud framework that creates a secure, trusted and audit-ready (STAR) environment may be just what IT executives need to say "yes" with confidence.

Not that long ago, cloud computing was little more than a speck on the horizon. We heard reports of it rapidly becoming a mainstream technology, but it had yet to make a meaningful impact on our technology landscape. According to EY's Global Information Security Survey, in 2010, 30 percent of respondents indicated that their organization used or was planning to use cloud computing-based services. In 2011, the percentage had risen to 44 percent. By 2012, cloud computing had reached a technological tipping point: Almost 60 percent of survey respondents said their organization was using or planned to use cloud computing services. And yet, 38 percent of respondents said that they had not taken any measures to mitigate the risks of using cloud computing services. This disruptive technology was advancing faster than many could secure it.

A more recent Forrester Research report suggests that for 73 percent of surveyed businesses in Europe and North America, security remains a major concern when considering cloud computing.

One of the first principles of improving information security is taking control of your environment. It would therefore feel counterintuitive for an organization to surrender control of its IT infrastructure and data to a third party. And yet this approach may offer the best opportunity to address increasingly complex security and privacy challenges. Rather than becoming an organization's worst security nightmare, cloud computing platforms may offer its best hope to create a more secure IT environment by strengthening controls and improving information and security capabilities.

Here are five insights for executives from EY for creating an environment that is secure, trusted and audit-ready.


Related Topics : Vulnerabilities and Patches, Resellers, Broadcom, Broadband Services, Supercomputing

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