5 Big Mistakes New Employees Should Avoid

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Being a 'Know-It-All'

As the new guy or girl in the office, you may want show that you are confident and competent. But walking in on the first day and thinking you have it all figured out can come across as cocky and condescending to your team members. Jumping right in with suggestions about "better" ways to do something can end up making you look foolish since you are basing ideas on incomplete information. You may have some great ideas, but when you start in a new position, it's advisable to spend the first few weeks familiarizing yourself with the organization. Consider offering your ideas for improvement once you have a good understanding of how things work and why current methods are used. Framing your feedback as a suggestion rather than criticism can also make your coworkers more receptive.

Once upon a time, it was fairly common for employees to start working for a company directly after high school or college and remain with that employer for the rest of their career. That type of career longevity is virtually unheard of these days. The Bureau of Labor Statistics notes that the typical millennial holds six different jobs just between the ages of 18 and 26.

The more jobs you have, the more first days at a new workplace you'll have to navigate. Starting a new job is a chance to start fresh with a brand-new group of colleagues. It's an opportunity to build on the skills you learned at your last job and develop additional areas of expertise.

But before you become a full-fledged member of the team, you'll have to establish relationships and build trust, and the way you handle your introduction to the company can either leave a great first impression — or build barriers you'll struggle to overcome later. In this slideshow, Dominique Jones, vice president of human resources at Halogen Software, a leader in talent management, has identified five mistakes to avoid so you can start off on the right foot at your new job.

Dominique is Halogen Software's vice president of human resources and has over 15 years experience in the talent management industry both in Europe and North America.Using her extensive industry experience across the retail, manufacturing, financial services, consulting and professional services sectors, Dominique is focused on providing practical insights that help HR positively impact business performance. Prior to joining Halogen Software, Dominique was most recently a regional vice president with a global talent management consulting firm. Dominique holds an M.A. Honours degree from St. Andrews University in Scotland, as well as the Institute of Personnel and Development (IPD) certification from the United Kingdom. Dominique spends her free time with family on their farm, tending her horses and rescued donkeys.


Related Topics : A Big Market for Big Data Jobs, Midmarket CIO, IT Management Automation, SharePoint, Technology Markets

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