5 Big Mistakes New Employees Should Avoid

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Failing to Ask Questions

Sometimes employees are so excited about taking on their new role and impressing their supervisor that they are reluctant to ask questions. Don't fall into that trap — it's essential to ask questions so you're clear about your responsibilities and get the information you need to perform tasks correctly. If you fail to ask questions now, you can set yourself up for even bigger mistakes later. So don't be afraid to ask everything from what high-priority projects you should work on first, to how to start an IT ticket or operate the breakroom espresso machine. People expect new employees to have questions, so it won't be perceived as a sign of weakness; rather it's a signal that you're proactively learning all you can about your new job and workplace environment.

Once upon a time, it was fairly common for employees to start working for a company directly after high school or college and remain with that employer for the rest of their career. That type of career longevity is virtually unheard of these days. The Bureau of Labor Statistics notes that the typical millennial holds six different jobs just between the ages of 18 and 26.

The more jobs you have, the more first days at a new workplace you'll have to navigate. Starting a new job is a chance to start fresh with a brand-new group of colleagues. It's an opportunity to build on the skills you learned at your last job and develop additional areas of expertise.

But before you become a full-fledged member of the team, you'll have to establish relationships and build trust, and the way you handle your introduction to the company can either leave a great first impression — or build barriers you'll struggle to overcome later. In this slideshow, Dominique Jones, vice president of human resources at Halogen Software, a leader in talent management, has identified five mistakes to avoid so you can start off on the right foot at your new job.

Dominique is Halogen Software's vice president of human resources and has over 15 years experience in the talent management industry both in Europe and North America.Using her extensive industry experience across the retail, manufacturing, financial services, consulting and professional services sectors, Dominique is focused on providing practical insights that help HR positively impact business performance. Prior to joining Halogen Software, Dominique was most recently a regional vice president with a global talent management consulting firm. Dominique holds an M.A. Honours degree from St. Andrews University in Scotland, as well as the Institute of Personnel and Development (IPD) certification from the United Kingdom. Dominique spends her free time with family on their farm, tending her horses and rescued donkeys.

 

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