Private Cloud Computing Deployments Advance Rapidly

Michael Vizard

Survey data indicates IT organizations are moving quickly to private cloud computing adoption.

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Although there are very few private cloud computing deployments in production, new survey data from the VMworld 2010 conference suggests that that the number of IT organizations planning on building their own private clouds is a lot higher than most people might think.

Virtual Instruments, a provider of tools for optimizing I/O performance in virtual environments, last week polled over 200 attendees at the VMworld 2010 conference. A surprisingly high percentage (34 percent) said they have already implemented a private cloud computing platform, while another 23 percent said they would be implementing one in the next 12 months.

From an IT perspective, there is nothing easy about implementing a private cloud, so most of these deployments are probably still in the pilot stage. But the survey does show a massive amount of interest in private cloud computing.

Given the economic climate, Len Rosenthal, vice president of marketing for Virtual Instruments, says he thinks that most IT organizations are trying to cobble together private clouds by leveraging their existing IT resources, versus buying new cloud computing platforms such as the Cisco Unified Computing System (UCS) or the BladeSystem Matrix from Hewlett-Packard.

However they choose to get there, it does seem apparent that IT organizations are not only in a hurry to reduce the cost of IT infrastructure, but also take advantage of the inherent flexibility of cloud computing.

Obviously, attendees at a VMworld 2010 conference might be a little further down the private cloud computing path than others, especially with 35 percent reporting that they had virtualized 50 percent or more of their business-critical and database applications. But even taking into account the familiarity these attendees have with virtualization technologies, Rosenthal said the survey results show that IT organizations are moving quickly toward the next major phase of virtualization.

Of course, many IT organizations have a long way to go in their sophistication when it comes to virtualization management specifically and cloud computing in general. But the one thing that does appear certain is that they are eager to learn.



Add Comment      Leave a comment on this blog post
Sep 8, 2010 1:09 PM Cloud_Zone Cloud_Zone  says:
Cloud computing is evolving fast. Today, organisations understand that they can use the model to cut costs, increase efficiency and be more responsive to changing market demands. They also know that the Cloud, with a range of �public� and �private� solutions available, can offer the security and information assurance to meet a range of needs. http://bit.ly/cceXwS Reply
Sep 29, 2010 10:09 PM April Sage April Sage  says:
As companies step their toes into the cloud and evolve their virtualized environments, pilots will yield to primary production systems using private cloud platforms. As SAN storage systems are integrated and the potential of zero-downtime hardware and software maintenance is realized at any time of the day (what, let the sys ops sleep?!), companies won't look back. In the fully comprehensive implementation of cloud computing, private cloud computing affords a very flexible, resource-friendly way to sync server and SAN systems between cloud environments capable of hot-failover at a fraction of the cost of bare metal restore or traditional backup paradigms. Of course, the complete migration to the private cloud will be a gradual process for in-house teams unless they partner with a cloud computing provider, but as the benefits of private cloud computing (http://resource.onlinetech.com/the-six-benefits-of-cloud-computing/) are revealed, fewer companies will be able to justify staying grounded in traditional infrastructures. Reply
Oct 29, 2010 10:10 PM Luke Vorster Luke Vorster  says:
It is not at all surprising that enterprises are wary of public clouds - they have never been otherwise with previous large-scale inter-networked technologies... Let's get real - IT business is about racing for the short-term gain over competitors. It is a primitive biological urge, when a species finds a comfortable environment, to eradicate all other species in that environment. The back-lash, however, is going to sting like a genetically modified killer-bee from the depths of hell itself - the compound total cost of ownership, the inevitable fragmentation (and lack of motivation to produce open standards through collaboration), will breed a new kind of information war, putting the power of technology back into the hands of the custodians of cyber-space to try to patch the problem in retrospect... as per! All that hoo-ha aside, however, surely vendors can put more effort into the software running on these platforms? Surely vendors need to step up and and invest in the human capital that _can_ solve these issues (e.g. computer scientists, mathematicians, etc.); rather than hiring software cowboys and trying to bulldoze clients with politically-oriented pitches? Take a step back, zoom out, lease a smart-card-based security mechanism from toshiba/hitachi/whoever, for example, and continue in the spirit of the Internet by _co-existing_ with it. If not, then the private cloud could become the ruin of the Internet (as it is discarded as a 'failure', or for lack of commercial interest). Maybe a different industrial model could solve the problem: Instead of outsourcing along the value chain, why not also identify an 'integrity' chain (driven by risk management), and outsource in that direction too? I am worried about market fragmentation, and the not-so-graceful degradation of the Internet due to neglect. The Internet is a cloud, and therefore we stand a chance of losing it (as a public space) by it being deprecated by hte largest bodies that currently sustain it. Too extreme? Let me know what you think about wanting freedom and taking the responsibility to make things 'secure enough'. I think we're just scared because we have no real experience in the reality of public clouds. In-house, private, obscure, and home-grown systems, however, have been around since before, but not after, the brith of the Internet. Development cost of using private clouds is surely much higher than public ones? This is for reasons that I could only explain in volumes of books more dense that Knuth's Art of Programming! Reply
Dec 20, 2010 11:16 PM Luke Vorster Luke Vorster  says: in response to Cloud_Zone
How is a private cloud sec. pol. different to an intranet? How is a public cloud sec. pol. different to a VPN? Reply
Feb 25, 2012 9:02 AM turbotax turbotax  says:
Maybe a different industrial model could solve the problem: Instead of outsourcing along the value chain, why not also identify an 'integrity' chain (driven by risk management), and outsource in that direction too? I am worried about market fragmentation, and the not-so-graceful degradation of the Internet due to neglect. Reply
Mar 7, 2012 2:03 AM briquetteing machine briquetteing machine  says:
Let me know what you think about wanting freedom and taking the responsibility to make things 'secure enough'. I think we're just scared because we have no real experience in the reality of public clouds. Reply
Mar 22, 2012 12:03 PM Nicole Nicole  says:
The advantage in making their own private cloud is that the company can customize the cloud according to their needs. Reply

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