Massachusetts Tops Tech Rankings, California Takes a Tumble

Susan Hall

Massachusetts once again topped the list of states in a Milken Institute study for its ability to create economic growth from technology and science, while California for the first time fell out of second place.

 

The independent think tank has produced the rankings three times since 2002. Its study looks at a number of factors -- 77 in all -- including a state's entrepreneurial environment, population of technology-savvy workers and government commitments to education and other programs that nurture tech growth, according to an Associated Press story on Newsvine.com.

 

This year, Maryland and Colorado displaced the home of Silicon Valley to take second and third place. California fell to fourth. Washington state moved up one place from the last study, done in 2004, to reach fifth place, reports The Seattle Post-Intelligencer.

 

The report says of technology clusters such as Silicon Valley:

The paradox of the global economy is that the enduring competitive advantages lie in location-specific competencies: knowledge, work force skills, customer and supplier relationships, entrepreneurial infrastructure, management practices, motivation, and quality-of-place attributes that allow firms to thrive. In short, think locally to succeed globally.

At the same time, notes the P-I, the report warns that:

the nation as a whole is on the cusp of losing vast amounts of intellectual capital overseas.


More from Our Network

Add Comment      Leave a comment on this blog post

Post a comment

 

 

 

 


(Maximum characters: 1200). You have 1200 characters left.

 

 

Subscribe to our Newsletters

Sign up now and get the best business technology insights direct to your inbox.


 

Resource centers

Business Intelligence

Business performance information for strategic and operational decision-making

SOA

SOA uses interoperable services grouped around business processes to ease data integration

Data Warehousing

Data warehousing helps companies make sense of their operational data