New Client Realities

Michael Vizard
Slide Show

Enterprise Client Evolving

Although Windows 7 is giving Microsoft something of a renaissance on the desktop, IT organizations will have to accept that there will be a lot more diversity coming.

Although Windows 7 is giving Microsoft something of a renaissance on the desktop, IT organizations will have to accept that there will be a lot more diversity in the coming years.

With the popularity of Windows 7, it's easy to think that we're returning to some level of normalcy on the desktop where Microsoft dominates all things.


But as an online poll of more than 500 information workers conducted by Unisys shows, there's more diversity on the desktop than ever, with desktop virtualization and employee-owned PCs gaining traction. Both tend to mean there's more Macs in the enterprise.


In the case of virtualization, the IT organization starts to focus on managing the virtual machine, rather than the underlying hardware. That quickly means the device running the virtual machine software is almost irrelevant from their point of view.


When employees bring their own PCs to work, this inevitably results in more Macs because many consumers like Apple products.


Of course, workers bring their own smartphones to work all the time. In many cases, these devices are already connected to enterprise applications, not to mention a few unsanctioned software-as-a-service applications.



That's not to say Windows 7 won't still be the center of the IT client universe. A separate online poll of 124 IT managers conducted by Unisys found that 36 percent plan to migrate to Windows 7 in the next six to 12 months, while of total of 62 percent said they would definitely migrate.


Sam Gross, vice president of global outsourcing solutions for Unisys, says that while many IT organizations still try to dictate which devices workers can use, the fight for control over the client is all over except for the shouting. End users are taking control of their computing experience and, like it or not, IT organizations will have to manage it.


The real question now, says Gross, is finding the best way to manage all those devices, along with the accompanying security issues, in a way that doesn't drive the internal IT organization insane.



Add Comment      Leave a comment on this blog post

Post a comment

 

 

 

 


(Maximum characters: 1200). You have 1200 characters left.

 

null
null

 

Subscribe to our Newsletters

Sign up now and get the best business technology insights direct to your inbox.