How to Lobby for the 2011 Security Budget

Michael Vizard
Slide Show

Five Security Budget Tips for 2011

Five tips that IT organizations should use to remind the business side why it needs to invest in security.

Trying to get funding for IT projects in general is especially tough right now, so finding money for security can only be even harder.


Even in the best of times, it's difficult to prove that there was any discernible return on investment in security. Now as we approach 2011 in the worst of times, the business is going to be inclined to minimize security costs as much as possible, even though we appear to be collectively losing that war with each passing day.


Chris Burgher, a security consultant with SunGard Availability Services, says that rather than getting all wrapped up in trying to prove that there is an actual return to be made on security investments, it's best to confront business leaders with the simple fact that security is a real cost of doing business.


Beyond the tons of regulations that carry real penalties and fines, a major security breach is likely to depress the stock price and shake customer confidence in ways that will be difficult to overcome.


Of course, there are ways to be more efficient when it comes to security by embracing the cloud, higher levels of automation and consolidation security appliances. But even with those adjustments, the cost of security may still rise in 2011.


To help deal with all this skepticism, Burgher adds it never hurts to keep some third-party validation around. You don't necessarily want to be seen saying the security sky is falling every day. But a few good security war stories here and there go a long way to remind people why they can't skimp on the security budget.



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Oct 11, 2011 1:41 AM General Lavender General Lavender  says:

I've just heard that Obama and the democrats have proposed widespread cuts to critical programs from a 50% cut in low-income heating assistance to nearly a 30% cut to the clean drinking water fund, a 15% cut to the Internet Security research. They have also proposed a 25% cut ($1.3 billion) to the community development block grants used to fund local community development including affordable housing, anti-poverty programs, and infrastructure development.

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Jan 13, 2013 9:58 PM smith smith  says:
To help deal with all this skepticism, Burgher adds it seldom hurts to keep some third-party validation http://www.killtests.com around. You don't necessarily need to be seen saying the security sky is falling every day. But a few lovely security war tales here & there go a long way to remind people why they cannot skimp on the security budget. Reply

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