Notion of Weak Demand for IT Skills Is 'Utterly Ridiculous'

Don Tennant

If there's one thing I've never had any patience for, it's the bashing of IT as a promising career field in general, and dissuading our kids from pursuing a career in IT in particular. As I've noted on numerous occasions, part of the problem lies in the continuing failure of a lot of people to distinguish between the idea of a shortage of IT workers, and that of a shortage of needed IT skills, which are two entirely different things. Another contributing factor, which clearly needs to be corrected, is the U.S. government's failure to update the way it classifies IT career fields so that accurate information about IT job availability is disseminated.

 

An outspoken critic of the government's failure in that regard is David Foote, CEO of Foote Partners, an IT employment analysis firm. In a recent interview with Computerworld, Foote explained the crux of the problem:

It begins with the Labor Department's Standard Occupational Classification system, which was updated in 2010 but still defines IT much the same as back in the old pure-technology MIS departments -- administrators, engineers, programmers, developers, analysts, user support and various infrastructure specialists. All federal employment reports map to the SOC's ancient IT model, which means only a small portion of the modern IT professional workforce is actually identified and tracked in these reports -- barely 20%, to be precise, and that's if you include tech consulting and temporary staffing jobs. [The SOC system does not] properly identify and track 16 million other people in the U.S. who bring various blends of technology skills, subject matter expertise and business savvy to their jobs in corporate functions, departments, product groups, business lines and other areas. These are IT professionals in 2011. Let's face it: IT jobs and skills have been migrating outside the walls of the traditional IT department for years, from administrative to executive levels. Marketing specialists, sales engineers, business analysts, logistics experts and even vice presidents of operations can now show impressive IT resumes. The list goes on and on. You'd think the government would have heard of social media, mobile computing, data analytics, collaboration technology and ERP by now.

Foote did a great job of explaining why all of this matters:

The traditional part of the IT workforce was hit pretty hard by the recession, spurring debate about whether IT is still a viable profession. But when you look at how great the other 80% of IT professionals are doing, the notion of a jobless recovery or weakness in demand for IT skills and workers is utterly ridiculous.

 

The intensity of the debate is the other reason why we have to get this right. As the boomers start to retire in big numbers, we can't afford to let young workers coming into the workforce mistakenly think that there aren't enormous IT job and career opportunities available to them. The bottom line is that there's never been a better time in history to be starting or building an IT career than right now, nor one with as many entry points and options. Once you grasp the reality of how much the label "IT professional" has changed, it becomes pretty obvious.

Foote is exactly right: There indeed has never been a better time for the generation of young people entering college and the work force to choose IT as their career. A lot of kids are passionate about technology and are convinced it's their calling. So let's do them-and our society-a favor and encourage them. Yes, there are obstacles, and yes, there are injustices that desperately need to be corrected. But let's not teach our kids that the answers to our problems lie in running away from them, or in waving a dispirited flag of surrender.



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Apr 20, 2011 3:36 AM hoapres hoapres  says:

As usual Don has it wrong

>> If there's one thing I've never had any patience for, it's the bashing of IT as a promising career field in general, and dissuading our kids from pursuing a career in IT in particular <<

Given Don's track record anyone who opposes recommending IT as a career is a "nutcase" or even worse

IT is an extremely poor career choice.

>> As I've noted on numerous occasions, part of the problem lies in the continuing failure of a lot of people to distinguish between the idea of a shortage of IT workers, and that of a shortage of needed IT skills,  <<

Got that wrong too.

IT skills are easily picked up and if a true demand existed for a particular "skill" then people would rush out to acquire the needed "skill"

I doubt that Don ever worked in a production level IT environment.

>> Foote is exactly right:

Foote has it exactly wrong.

>> There indeed has never been a better time for the generation of young people entering college and the work force to choose IT as their career. <<

You got that wrong too.

The best time to get into IT was from about 1950 to the early 1980s.  You landed a good paying job at HP, IBM, etc. and you were pretty much set for life economically.

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Apr 20, 2011 4:06 AM Dolores Dolores  says: in response to hoapres

Things that are pretty much gone from American IT:

1. The "entry level position"

2. Where they train you

3. The ability to get a contract job that's a little stretch so you can grow.

Now what I'm seeing are all jobs where you are basically expected to already have been in the job they're trying to hire for a number of years. I'm also seeing several jobs combined into one: DBA + Web Master + Hardware and Desktop Tech Support. Demanding an exact blend of experience plus education/training/certification that it's hard to see how real people can match. Often demanding domain knowlege you could only have gotten from already working there (the Feds are especially bad for this).

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Apr 20, 2011 4:20 AM hoapres hoapres  says: in response to Dolores

But according to Don you are "utterly ridiculous"

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Apr 20, 2011 4:28 AM Dolores Dolores  says: in response to hoapres

Guess Don hasn't been looking for an IT job in a major metropolitan area lately. Am I imagining things, or does this match what you're seeing, hoapres?

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Apr 20, 2011 4:54 AM hoapres hoapres  says: in response to Dolores

>> Am I imaging things

No

The problem with Don is that you are "utterly ridiculous" if you claim that a weak demand exists for IT skills.

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Apr 20, 2011 5:37 AM R. Lawson R. Lawson  says:

If you look at the IT employment statics across all occupations, the field has flatlined (and declined slightly) over the last 10 years.

I've researched the OES numbers completely and for many years.  There have in fact been "better times" - much better times.  If you want to rip apart the statics I'll gladly do that.

That said, it isn't 1930s Wall-Street either.  This is not a bad occupation, despite the market manipulation and heavy handed tactics that occur.

My biggest complaint with many of the people claiming that "things are great" is that first - they are wrong.  Things aren't bad, but they aren't terrific either.  Second, they usually have some angle - as in "oh my God, we have a shortage!  We need to exploit more immigrants from India!".  Straight from the ITAA playbook.

Foot had better take another look at the numbers.  This is something I will gladly go toe to toe on with him on.  Foot is right on the OES statics being flawed, however I would rather have data that paints a relatively reliable picture over time than more correct data that is useless over time.  The constant meddling with OES surveys makes a time series analysis difficult if not impossible when it comes to an apples to apples comparison.

OES needs to take charge of their historic data, and map it accurately to their current methodology - and also make it more easily queried.  That's going to be tough to do considering budget cuts and pressures.

Finally, the OES survey lists way more than 20% of the occupation.  Is Foot claiming that we have 16 million IT jobs?  You've got to be very creative with your definition of IT worker in order to arrive at any number over 5-10 million.  More important than what occupational bucket we lump people are what skills they are utilizing, and how valuable those skills are to employers (pay should correlate directly to value). 

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Apr 20, 2011 5:44 AM hoapres hoapres  says: in response to R. Lawson

>> This is not a bad occupation.

Sure looks that way.  Outside of the H1B issue, salaries in IT have been declining at a rapid rate.  While you can argue that the economy is "bad all over", IT has had problems ever since the dot com bust.

Ironically enough it is the fact that one has to do a LOT of digging to get any reliable statistics makes it more likely that IT is a bad career choice.

Even UC Berkeley is claiming that it's CS graduates are having trouble finding employment.

>> Things aren't bad

Oh Yes they are.

Come on now.

Let's get real.

Of course, you can argue that everything is bad but to say that any field is not bad is pretty hard to back up.

Things are bad everywhere.

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Apr 20, 2011 6:29 AM Bill Bill  says:

None of the commentators to this column bothered to read the Foote column, and so their arguments are uninformed and don't even address the central thesis Foote (and Tennant) are making. This is about the fact that the definition of "IT professional" now includes people who don't work in the IT department directly. These are people who occupy jobs all over the enterprise who cannot do their jobs without being tech-savvy to the point of specialization (by that I mean they are not simply using PCs to do their work, for example). They are hired into marketing depts, operations depts, finance depts, HR depts, sales depts, and a hundred other places because they have a knowledge and skill sets in information technology that others don't who may even have the same job title. They do work that was once thrown over the transom to the IT dept or that was done by contractors/consultants if the IT dept didn't have the capabilities. They almost never have degrees in IM or CS (although some have minored in it) but instead they learned their IT skills in other ways, perhaps even having worked in IT at one time or having worked with IT professionals on projects. Or they learned in on their own. They have degrees in math, sciences, business, economics, finance, marketing, even liberal arts, but they have deep IT skills and aptitudes so important to their jobs that they are by definition hybrid IT-business professionals who will never work in a traditional IT org under a CIO or CTO.  That's not their focus.

So people, wise up and open your eyes. Stop thinking of 'IT professional' in the most narrow of ways, the way feds think of it. We moved on from that world years ago. Think 'pervasive IT' distributed all over the enterprise and then tell me that people with great IT skills critical to their primary jobs aren't found in droves throughout a company. You find them in administrative roles. You find them in executive roles. You find them working in marketing depts right now as social media experts dreaming up content and marketing strategies while also being extremely knowledgeable about security and risk management issues and regulations. You find math PhD's doing statistical modeling and predictive analytics for CIOs but also for CFOs and COOs and they don't work in IT departments!! They work everywhere but IT depts.

In 2011, IT-business hybrids = the 2011 IT professional, regardless of where they sit in the org and who they report to, which is probably not a CTO or a CIO. These are the entry levels jobs that IT-savvy kids will aspire to. They don't want to be DBAs or software engineers---they want to build products and businesses. And they don't want to be stuck reporting to a CIO when they can go farther, faster using their tech skills elsewhere in the enterprise. 

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Apr 20, 2011 6:36 AM Dolores Dolores  says: in response to Bill

Oh, yeah? Well in my last job I was supporting these newfangled IT pros. And, once there was an upgrade or a patch or a security threat or anything out of the ordinary happened, they were as helpless as toddlers and came crying to me. And if you think a pure-play IT job is hard to get an interview for, wait till you try and get one of these newfangled jobs, regardless of your qualifications. I smell another excuse for more H-1Bs coming on....

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Apr 20, 2011 6:40 AM hoapres hoapres  says: in response to Bill

>> ...they want to build products and businesses

The next big bubble is "social media".  What the post reduces down to is that you need "soft skills", "people skills", etc. and true technical skills come in at a very distant second.

While that is true, it just goes to show you that IT is "played out". 

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Apr 20, 2011 6:45 AM hoapres hoapres  says: in response to Bill

>> None of the ...

Well I did read the Foote article

>> definition of IT ...includes those who don't directly work in IT.

Well

If I define a physicist as everyone employed in physics then we would not have any unemployed physicists.

Before you laugh, I actually heard that argument used by the American Institute of Physics in the distant past probably the early late 1980s when the claim is that we had no unemployed physicists.

If you define IT professional as someone NOT working in the field then everything that follows becomes to put it mildly suspect.

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Apr 20, 2011 6:47 AM Dolores Dolores  says: in response to hoapres

I have yet to see an IT job in this current market with my skillset that does not also demand strong SQL and database skills. I NEVER had an opportunity to use SQL in the last 8 years. Having it would have been like a teat on a bull.  To me it's not just people skills, it's an industryIT. Like, bankingit, education+IT, and so on. It just got much harder to get a job in America, boys and girls.

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Apr 20, 2011 9:00 AM hoapres hoapres  says: in response to Dolores

>> ...does not also demand...

Or better put companies looking for a nonexistent "purple squirrel".  I am pretty skeptical about Don's claims as I suspect that he was never involved in IT in the first place outside of writing articles about it.

IT is just glutted beyond belief with thousands and thousands and thousands of qualified people applying for every job.  O.K. "Thousands and thousand and thousands" is an exaggeration but not by much.

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Apr 20, 2011 9:17 AM Dolores Dolores  says: in response to hoapres

It's definitely in the hundreds and hundreds anyway, which is unmanageable and ridiculous.

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Apr 20, 2011 10:20 AM hoapres hoapres  says: in response to Dolores

>> It's definitely in the hunderds and hunderds...

Well

I guess that in Don's eyes we are "utterly ridiculous" in that we belief in the "notion of weak demand for IT skills"

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Apr 21, 2011 2:07 AM hoapres hoapres  says: in response to Ian Hay

>> This never materialized.

How right you are.  We heard lots of talk in the late 80s and early 90 of an impending labor shortage which was used to justify importation of foreign scientists and engineers.

Unfortunately, very few if any in journalism reported that we have a huge glut of unemployed qualified STEM people.

>> ...lazy journalism...

resulting in articles such as this one.  Don doesn't want to hear opposing views obviously on claims of "weak demand" but those are the facts of life.

This relates to the "lazy journalism" part.  One that pounded the pavement quite likely would have heard "the old broken record" of labor shortages due to retirements.

>> The education industry is desperate to say that there are so many jobs in the industry

So right you are.

One of the reasons even though according to Don that I would be "utterly ridiculous" is we don't have that many jobs to go around particularly in IT.  The salaries have declined so much that the investment in time and education don't justify the return.  Even Berkeley and Stanford grads are having trouble landing a job.  What schools DO NOT tell you that if you don't attend a top 10 school such as Berkeley, Stanford, MIT, etc. then your chances of getting a LOT lower. 

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Apr 21, 2011 3:41 AM Ian Hay Ian Hay  says: in response to hoapres

>> What schools DO NOT tell you that if you don't attend a top 10 school...

There are reports that this is now true of MBA's and lawyers. Unless you graduate from a top tier school, all you will have is a piece of paper and a massive student loan.

What confuses the issue is that there are shortages of specific skills. In fact by definition there always will be shortages of specific skills. If I want someone with 5+ years RoR and 10+ SQL then it will be very hard to find such a person. That doesn't mean that more people should go to school and become IT professionals.

>> Don doesn't want to hear opposing views...

Don has only "seen the light" when it was pushed in his face. Take the case of Infosys. No visa fraud, no visa fraud, no.... oh crap, there's lots of visa fraud.

Don's preferred form of journalism - find industry shill (CompTIA, Foote, etc), present straw man argument to shill, shill dispels argument, Don castigates discouraged IT community for being negative.

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Apr 21, 2011 3:55 AM hoapres hoapres  says: in response to Ian Hay

>> What confuses the issue is that there are shortages of specific skills. <<

Not really.

Companies look for non existent purple squirrels.  Skill shortages are overblown.  A top notch C/C++ software engineer with over 20 years of experience would be able to pick up Javascript, PHP, ROR, etc. in a couple of weeks and with high liklihood would be a better ROR engineer than one who just had a couple of years with ROR and nothing else.

Unfortunately the company will with high liklihood hire only someone with experience with the "latest and greatest"

>> In fact by definition there always will be shortages of specific skills. <<

Exactly.

Industry goes around complaining about a "shortage".  What very few point out is that you can define the job requirements such that a "shortage" always exist.  If you define the job requirements such that only those currently employed in the field then by definition you will always have a "shortage".

>> If I want someone with 5+ years RoR and 10+ SQL then it will be very hard to find such a person. <<

aka Searching for a non existent "purple squirrel".  Just because you have a "shortage" of non existent "purple squirrels" does NOT mean that you have a shortage of people qualified to do the job at hand.

>>  That doesn't mean that more people should go to school and become IT professionals. <<

EXACTLY

And some are starting to figure that out.  The Silicon Valley EDD (unemployment offices) no longer offer retraining for IT careers because of the huge glut of unemployed people.  As it stands now one of the few EDD retraining programs is for retail management.  While EDD should hardly be considered a dispositive source of information on the job market, EDD will pound the pavement to see what programs are likely to generate employment.

>> Don's preferred form of journalism - find industry shill (CompTIA, Foote, etc), present straw man argument to shill, shill dispels argument, Don castigates discouraged IT community for being negative. <<

Agreed.

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Apr 21, 2011 3:57 AM Don Tennant Don Tennant  says: in response to Ian Hay

I'm unclear on what the purpose is for deliberately making false statements about what I've written, but it tells me that you can't seem to refute what I have actually written. Claiming that I ever wrote that there was no visa fraud before the Infosys case arose is a lie. I have long written about H-1B visa fraud and abuse, but by challenging the haters and their apologists along the way, I've compelled people like you to misrepresent or completely falsify the facts. That you feel you have to do that says everything about the legitimacy of your position.

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Apr 21, 2011 4:52 AM hoapres hoapres  says: in response to Don Tennant

>>I'm unclear on what the purpose is for deliberately making false statements about what I've written, <<

Looked pretty accurate.

>>  but it tells me that you can't seem to refute what I have actually written. <<

Well

He just did.

He doesn't believe that "the notion of weak demand for IT skills is utterly ridiculous"

Guess what

He is right.

>> Claiming that I ever wrote that there was no visa fraud before the Infosys case arose is a lie. <<

Well

Did you ever write about H1B problems in the 1990s ??

I doubt it.

>> I have long written about H-1B visa fraud and abuse, <<

I will have to take your word for it although I have my doubts.

>> but by challenging the haters and their apologists along the way, <<

You are making things up.  You are searching for nonexistent purple squirrels.  H1B opponents running around like nutcases doing acts of violence. 

>>  I've compelled people like you to misrepresent or completely falsify the facts. <<

That is the problem.

You don't have the facts right.

>> That you feel you have to do that says everything about the legitimacy of your position. <<

Nice try

Doesn't work.

The rational "Since I can't refute what you wrote then I simply say you are wrong ..." doesn't work.

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Apr 21, 2011 5:33 AM Ian Hay Ian Hay  says: in response to Don Tennant

But Don, you're the one making false statements and implications about what I said. I didn't say you didn't discuss H-1B fraud or existence. It's that you very clearly disputed what others were saying about its severity and dismissed their objections. It wasn't until a poster pointed you towards the Infosys case that you completely changed your tune and went full force into the Infosys case. I applaud you for following up on the Infosys case and speaking with the lawyer. That is good journalism.

Taking one instance of an idiot making threats against you and claiming that there is a case to made that the anti-H-1B crowd is full of violent warmongers is BAD journalism. If you want to be just a blogger than fine, but good journalists don't do that.

>> but by challenging the haters and their apologists along the way, I've compelled people like you to misrepresent or completely falsify the facts.

This is politically correct dribble and makes no sense.

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Apr 21, 2011 5:43 AM hoapres hoapres  says: in response to Ian Hay

>> ... dismissed their objections ...  <<

Even worse is by innuendo is that you are labeled "ridiculous", "prone to violence", etc. if you disagree with Don.

>> ... BAD journalism ... <<

Or LAZY journalism.

Not picking on Don with regards to LAZY but most of his ramblings on H1Bs is pretty much off target.

Like I said before.

I don't think Don ever worked in IT.

IT workers have seen first hand the effects of H1Bs and have their problems never got the attention of the mainstream media until perhaps a little bit and definitely too late now.

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Apr 21, 2011 10:12 AM Ian Hay Ian Hay  says: in response to hoapres

You might be right. I'm puzzled why Don has expressed so much animosity towards domestic IT pros.

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Apr 21, 2011 10:45 AM Ian Hay Ian Hay  says: in response to Ian Hay

Getting back to rebutting the main theme of this column, the following link might be helpful:

http://www.economist.com/blogs/schumpeter/2011/04/higher_education

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Apr 21, 2011 12:10 PM Ian Hay Ian Hay  says: in response to Dolores

When I went to school in the early 90's there was a cry out that we would not have enough people to fill the tech jobs because of soon to be retiring boomers. This never materialized.

There is a hollowing out of the workforce occurring in this country. There are less jobs available to the middle class and as a result the middle class is shrinking.

What we are seeing in the media is lazy journalism. Most stories in the media are pure noise. The education industry is desperate to say that there are so many jobs in the industry. There are not nearly enough entry level jobs available to feed the pipe.

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Apr 22, 2011 1:03 AM hoapres hoapres  says: in response to Don Tennant

>> I raised the question of whether anti-H-1B fanatics who engage in threat-making and hatemongering are prone to violence in the workplace. <<

To which the answer should be obviously NO.  Unless you can "cough up the goods" and show SPECIFIC examples of violence which I don't think you can.

As another pointed out : Wasn't the Times bomber on an H1B ?

...legitimacy... <<

That's part of the problem.

The question was not legitimate.

>> ...stop distorting...

Sorry

You are the one doing the distorting.

While it is the job of the editor, I don't want to give you the bad news but your type of "journalism" would get you thrown off the high school newspaper.

The cynic in me believes that you are trying to "bait" people with opposing views to respond in a negative way that you can exploit by labeling them as a "nutcase", etc.

Although it appears that EVERYONE that disagrees with you is a "nutcase"

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Apr 22, 2011 1:44 AM hoapres hoapres  says: in response to hoapres

My standard answer to young Americans that wish to enter IT and I am not alone :

IT has extremely grim job prospects along with the importation of cheap foreign labor and is being rapidly offshored on a daily basis.  Salaries are declining and the return on investment for the requisite college degree is extremely poor.

While Don may not have "patience" with those that say it, well that is his "tough luck".

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Apr 22, 2011 3:23 AM hoapres hoapres  says: in response to Ian Hay

>> You might be right. <<

I just don't think Don ever worked in IT.

>> I'm puzzled why Don has expressed so much animosity towards domestic IT pros. <<

Only Don can answer that question.

If Don wants to claim to be a "journalist" then he should read very carefully the first sentence :

>> If there's one thing I've never had any patience for, it's the bashing of IT as a promising career field in general, and dissuading our kids from pursuing a career in IT in particular. <<

Which translates into :

If you don't agree with me then there is something wrong with you.

Then you look at the second sentence :

>> As I've noted on numerous occasions, part of the problem lies in the continuing failure of a lot of people to distinguish between the idea of a shortage of IT workers, and that of a shortage of needed IT skills, which are two entirely different things. <<

This is the reason I suspect Don never worked in IT. If he had then he would realize that most IT skills can be picked up in short order.

Then you look at the third sentence :

>> Another contributing factor, which clearly needs to be corrected, is the U.S. government's failure to update the way it classifies IT career fields so that accurate information about IT job availability is disseminated. <<

which turns out to be incorrect.  The government reporting failures has nothing to do with the state of IT employment.  Unless you accept that "tweaking the definitions" to serve your needs to make "lemonade out of lemons"

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Apr 22, 2011 3:49 AM Ian Hay Ian Hay  says: in response to hoapres

>> The cynic in me believes that you are trying to "bait" people with opposing views to respond in a negative way that you can exploit by labeling them as a "nutcase", etc.

I think what you're saying is that Don is engaging in a tepid form of gonzo journalism. The first step is to write an inflammatory column guaranteed to invoke an emotional response. Use the responses as a lead into new columns all the while hiding behind weasel words so that things are implied rather than specifically stated. Take the moral high road in further rebuttals and goto step 1.

My apologies for using a goto statement in the code.

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Apr 22, 2011 7:17 AM mataj mataj  says:

Computerworld: So the government doesn't see someone who oversees online security and social media development and reports to a business unit as an IT worker.

Foote: Right. Nor does it properly identify and track 16 million other people in the U.S. who bring various blends of technology skills, subject matter expertise and business savvy to their jobs in corporate functions, departments, product groups, business lines and other areas.

In order to get paid for overseeing social media development you need a cousin in hiring department, not a college.

IT college education, especially technical, will never pay your student loan.

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Apr 22, 2011 8:16 AM hoapres hoapres  says: in response to Ian Hay

You got it right.

As I said before, I don't believe Don ever worked in IT.

For what it is worth, I know of LOTS of highly qualified IT people looking for work along with hiring managers that tell me they have NO trouble at all in finding qualified applicants.

Don can peddle all the govt. statistics that he wants but the reality is that weak demand for IT skills is pretty obvious to those actually working in the field.

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Apr 22, 2011 8:54 AM Don Tennant Don Tennant  says: in response to Ian Hay

Nonsense. What you wrote is:

'Take the case of Infosys. No visa fraud, no visa fraud, no.... oh crap, there's lots of visa fraud.'

And you're taking issue with my response that you claimed that I've written that there is no visa fraud? You're claiming that I'm making false statements and implications about that? You can't see how outrageous that is?

It is patently false that I ever disputed its severity or dismissed anyone's objections about visa fraud. I have consistently disputed the tack of addressing the issue with threats, hatefulness and insults, and I will continue to do so. Fault me for what I write if you're so inclined, but faulting me for positions that you make up and attribute to me is inexcusable.

You're doing exactly the same thing in reference to my post in which I raised the question of whether anti-H-1B fanatics are prone to violence in the workplace. I did not raise the question based on the threats made by one person. I cited that one case as an example of the types of threats and hatemongering that you have unquestionably seen if you've followed this issue at all. To say that I was 'claiming that there is a case to be made that the anti-H-1B crowd is full of violent warmongers' is again making up a position and attributing it to me. I made no such claim or insinuation. I raised the question of whether anti-H-1B fanatics who engage in threat-making and hatemongering are prone to violence in the workplace. It seems implausible that you could possibly deny the existence of such an element within the 'anti-H-1B crowd.' So when you were unable to shoot down the legitimacy of my having raised the question of whether those people present a threat of violence in the workplace, you completely distorted what I wrote and claimed that I was making the case that the anti-H-1B crowd is full of violent warmongers. That way, you could take issue. But once again, I would advise you to take issue with what I actually write, not with this stuff that you make up and attribute to me. I'm confident that you can find plenty in what I actually write to disagree with. But if you can't, stop distorting what I write, and making false claims about what I write, so you can challenge it.

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May 1, 2011 2:42 AM hoapres hoapres  says: in response to hoapres

For what it is worth which is not much

EDD (Employment development department) in Silicon Valley no longer supports retraining to enter the "booming high tech field".  The only program that they are supporting at the moment is retail management.

EDD personnel tell unemployed IT people that they had better plan on doing something else as the field is glutted beyond belief with qualified applicants looking for work.

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May 4, 2011 11:19 AM AmericanCitizen AmericanCitizen  says:

Hi Don,

            I came upon this Blog by chance. You've got a site that is very relevant and important for the American Citizen. All Americans have to be aware of all the nonsense going on in the H1B area. It is way beyond time to STOP these H1B Visas and all the other Work Visas, and make way for Jobs for the Millions of Our Citizens who are desperate for work. Most of these H1Bs are frauds and have to be fired ASAP and Americans hired instead.

If i were the President who really cared for America,  I would ASAP sign a Bill authorising a STOP to all Work Visas, except for those who get a PhD Degree in America. No more renewals of Work Visas. Time to send these H1Bs out! No more Discussion and Political Correctness. Have a 5 year freeze on all Work visas. Time to take our country back!

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