Infosys Whistleblower's Attorney Releases Incriminating Evidence

Don Tennant

Kenny Mendelsohn, the attorney for Infosys employee and whistleblower Jay Palmer, has released a series of internal emails and other documents that provide a stunning play-by-play account of how a B-1 visa holder from India was brought to the United States under false pretenses, and was put to work at a client site in direct violation of U.S visa and tax laws. And they show how relentless Palmer was in trying to put an end to the charade.

 

Mendelsohn said the documents relating to this particular individual, whom we'll call Mr. X, are representative of the many others he has that relate to other B-1 visa holders and Infosys' institutionalized practice of illegally assigning them to work at client sites in the United States.

 

The case of Mr. X began on Aug. 6, 2010, when Kiranraj Karkera, an Infosys engagement manager based in Chicago, wrote to Ravi Kumar S, Infosys' vice president of enterprise solutions in Bangalore. The letter served as an invitation for Mr. X to come for two weeks of meetings at Infosys' Chicago office; it was the document that had to be presented to the U.S. consulate to secure a B-1 visa for Mr. X. Here's an excerpt:

We have business meetings and workshops related to an SFDC Implementation project here in Chicago, Illinois. In this connection, we would like to invite [Mr. X] to visit our [Infosys] office at 2300 Cabot Dr., Lisle, IL 60532, starting August 30, 2010. During this visit, he will be involved in interacting with client IT and business stakeholders, and in making a presentation on quality assurance related to sales process automation. He is anticipated to be here for 2 weeks.

That's exactly the sort of thing people here on B-1 visas are supposed to be doing, and the length of time they're supposed to be doing it, as Infosys well knows. Unfortunately, that's not what Mr. X was doing here, and that's not how long he stayed. The documents that Mendelsohn released to me show that Infosys put Mr. X to work at a client site -- Heidrick & Struggles International (H&S), an executive search firm based in Chicago-to perform software quality assurance and testing work. And they show that Infosys billed H&S for the work performed by Mr. X. That's a flagrant violation of U.S. law, and Infosys knows it.

 

It also knows that when someone on a B-1 visa is here for much longer than six weeks, that raises a red flag that U.S. immigration authorities are likely to spot. So it assigned Mr. X to H&S for 45 days.

 


On Oct. 1, Jennifer Alvarez, a quality assurance analyst at H&S, sent an email to Sarah Cryder, IT manager in the Project Management Office at H&S, to try to get an extension for Mr. X for a few more days:

[Mr. X]'s 45 day onsite contract is creeping upon us. He is scheduled to return to India October 18th. Since CRP1 got pushed to Oct 20-21st I believe it would be in our best interest to have [Mr. X] on site for CRP1. Would it be possible to request an extension for him to Friday October 22nd?

So Oct. 22 became the last milestone date for Mr. X, and the date that Infosys would bill H&S for his services in the amount of $8,480. That, remember, is illegal-you can't bill a client for services performed by a person here on a B-1 visa.

 

On Oct. 19, Manish Sawla, an Infosys offshore project manager, emailed Palmer to request that he get H&S's approval for the Oct. 22 milestone billing. Palmer thereupon emailed Shazia Mian, director of application systems at H&S, requesting approval for the $8,480 billing for Mr. X's services. Mian gave the approval.

 

Later the same day Palmer forwarded this email string to Infosys corporate counsel Jeffrey Friedel, with a cc to Lynne Grant, Infosys' employee relations manager. He pleaded with them to do something:

This is so illegal and wrong for me to have to bill the customer for this person. What am I suppose[d] to do? Guidance please. Now I am being asked to get a [Change Request] extension signed for [Mr. X] who is on a B-1?

The next day, Palmer sent an email to Friedel in which he detailed the work that Mr. X had been doing at H&S:

[Mr. X] is tasked to come on site as the Quality Assurance/Testing Lead at Heidrick and Struggles located at 233 South Wacker Chicago, Il. His project task consists of reviewing designs and then to physically create and write test scripts. After he creates the said test scripts (code) he will type them into the system and execute them in order to find errors in the system. At this time he will identified [sic] "bugs" and then correct the code and retest. This process is repeated over many weeks.

So Infosys had been sitting on all of this information for over nine months when, on July 26, Infosys Chief Marketing Officer Paul Gottsegen issued a statement in response to the damning testimony Palmer had submitted to a Senate subcommittee hearing on immigration reform earlier that day-testimony that recounted the activity that was exemplified by the case of Mr. X. I included the full text of Gottsegen's statement in my post, "Internal Infosys Document Eyes Wiggle Room' Around Visa Rules." Here's an excerpt:

The commentary submitted today by Jay Palmer (via Senator Charles Grassley) to the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Immigration, Refugees and Border Security, is full of inaccuracies, exaggerations and falsehoods. Mr. Palmer is obviously intent on spreading his falsehoods about Infosys and our business practices as broadly as possible in order to advance his objective of getting as big of a payout as he can from the Company.

As I've previously written, Mendelsohn didn't take kindly to Infosys calling Palmer a liar. Not surprisingly, Palmer didn't, either. Palmer conveyed his response to Gottsegen's accusation to Mendelsohn, who shared the thrust of it with me:

Jay is saddened by Mr. Gottsegen' s hurtful remarks -- this after Jay made every effort to embrace Infosys while abiding by the letter of the Whistleblower policy. It was Infosys HR managers who suggested to him that he retain an attorney, because Infosys management in India would not let them do the right thing. Remember, Jay waited over eight months before he hired me. As stated repeatedly in emails to Infosys management that we will release, Jay tried to be a part of the solution and not add to the problem. There are many, many emails he sent to management with little or no response. What hurts Jay the most is that Infosys employees are dedicated to their customers, and he feels strongly that the customers should continue to recognize the value they're getting. Jay is not against people coming to America in order to better themselves and their families-he is an advocate of that dream. But he is against breaking the law to obtain profits. He looks forward to an apology from Mr. Gottsegen and Infosys, however unlikely that may be. Regardless, we will ask him, Infosys management, and-unfortunately, from Jay's perspective-Infosys' customers, some tough questions during deposition.

Mendelsohn expressed his own response to Gottsegen's statement more succinctly:

I am reviewing all of our documents and am going to continue to release evidence that proves Infosys violated our laws until someone from Infosys publicly apologizes to Jay for Gottsegen calling him a liar.

Note to Infosys: I think he means it.



Add Comment      Leave a comment on this blog post
Aug 8, 2011 1:12 AM Virgil Biereschwale Virgil Biereschwale  says:
Aug 8, 2011 1:40 AM who knows who knows  says:

"So Oct. 22 became the last milestone date for Mr. X, and the date that Infosys would bill H&S for his services in the amount of $8,480. That, remember, is illegal-you can't bill a client for services performed by a person here on a B-1 visa."

This part doesn't seem to be right....any person come here for client meetings (any meetings for that matter) has to be paid by the client if the contract requires it. You cannot expect people work on a project free of cost just because he/she is on B-1. Only thing is Infosys can charge client but they cannot pay the person in B-1 any salary in US.

Once you started a project any time spent on the project by any person is billable to client nothing is free of cost.

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Aug 8, 2011 1:47 AM Don Tennant Don Tennant  says: in response to who knows

You missed the point. The point is it's against the law for a person here on a B-1 to perform billable work at a client site. He should never have been there working in the first place. He was supposed to be there for meetings at the Infosys office.

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Aug 8, 2011 2:22 AM Madagasper Madagasper  says:

These are damning revelations.  I wonder if the US DOJ is also investigating other Indian IT firms for similar violations.  It is inconceivable that this game was only mastered by Infosys.

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Aug 8, 2011 2:54 AM hireamerica hireamerica  says: in response to Madagasper

They are all doing it.

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Aug 8, 2011 3:30 AM who knows who knows  says: in response to Don Tennant

Don I get that point, but how could government define what is billable and what not to a client. If I send my resource for meeting with client (let it be in Infosys office or client office) and my client agreed to bare all the expenses (which is reasonable and usual...unless my resource is here for sales meeting) including his time spent on meetings in US and time spend on preparing for meeting in offshore. When I charge my client during meetings by offshore resources...why should I not charge my client if the same resource is here in US (provided my client is ready to pay for it).

PS: I am not trying to defend Infosys actions (if it is against law ...it is against law..even if the law has bad effect) here as it seems like the resource performed testing job.

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Aug 8, 2011 3:32 AM Indian_tatti Indian_tatti  says: in response to who knows

You can't bill since you are not going to Pay tax on that bill.

Thats the reason this B1 visa is there for short term meetings. You need not to use your thoughts about what it should be, what it should not be. Rather concentrate on what Infosys did and were they aware of this or not.

Answer is very simple - Infosys did fraud.

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Aug 8, 2011 4:02 AM Don Tennant Don Tennant  says: in response to who knows

The problem is he wasn't meeting with the client. He was performing software QA and testing work over a matter of weeks for the client. Read the post again -- the work he was doing is spelled out. You can't do that stuff on a B-1. That's billable work that requires the worker to pay U.S. tax. That tax isn't paid because B-1 visa holders can't pay taxes here because they can't work here. I think part of the problem in wrapping your head around this is that it's so blatant -- you'd think a company wouldn't do something so clearly illegal, so there must be a catch. There's no catch. They blatantly, knowingly broke the law.

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Aug 8, 2011 4:12 AM hireamerica hireamerica  says: in response to who knows

They should have brought the resources on an H1 visa. The B1 costs about only 6000 rupees, abou $150, which is considerable cheaper than the H1 visa, hence companies break the law.

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Aug 8, 2011 4:21 AM R. Lawson R. Lawson  says: in response to who knows

"Don I get that point, but how could government define what is billable and what not to a client."

It's very simple. If you are charging for services rendered while on the B-1 visa, you are breaking the law. The government created this visa so that companies could conduct business transactions (such as meetings and inking deals) without meeting stricter requirements found in the H-1b visa (like prevailing wage requirements).

In exchange for this less strict visa and in return the ability to more easily conduct business, companies are to not use this visa for "work". Anything service you charge your clients for is "work".

The reason we need to strictly enforce this law is that if we don't companies like Infosys will leverage the visa to bypass other visa laws.

If you need someone in a meeting here that is billable here is a novel idea - "HIRE AN AMERICAN WORKER".

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Aug 8, 2011 4:33 AM asg asg  says: in response to Don Tennant

I think you are confused between USCIS and IRS. I can bet 1000 $ paid in cash to you or to any one who can show me US law stating what you are saying.

These kind of idiocy is quite common. There are 100's of sites like murthy.com, trackitt, immigrationvoice where people keep trying to figure out what exactly is the law. So it is no surprise that a street lawyer would like to exploit popular sentiment. I though this case was in court.

Moreover aren't you gentlemen prejudicing the stated case or is it that it is part of some strategy to exert pressure. Why doesn't the attorney stand out and release the documents much like Infosys management called the bluff. When they called Mr Palmer a liar, they did not sugar coat their words. In return Mr Palmer has promised us that he is going to get Infosys to shut down the US ops. We are waiting ....

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Aug 8, 2011 4:35 AM asds@gmail.com asds@gmail.com  says: in response to R. Lawson

Oh yeah. Govt came and informed you at your house why they are making laws for infosys. Really.

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Aug 8, 2011 4:49 AM hireamerica hireamerica  says: in response to asds@gmail.com

This is where the mudslinging begins...stick to the point...or else I can give it right back to you.

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Aug 8, 2011 4:51 AM R. Lawson R. Lawson  says: in response to asds@gmail.com

"Oh yeah. Govt came and informed you at your house why they are making laws for infosys. Really."

Your silly comment doesn't change the law - a law made for all companies (not just Infosys). 

Aside from "your comment is silly" I don't know how else to respond to you.

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Aug 8, 2011 4:53 AM Don Tennant Don Tennant  says: in response to asg

Mr. Palmer has said nothing about shutting down Infosys' U.S. operations. That's absurd, and it's outrageous that you would make such a claim. If you read something somewhere that gave you that impression, I'd love to see it. If you're simply making something up and attributing it to Palmer, be advised that my patience for that sort of thing is very limited.

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Aug 8, 2011 5:20 AM tenner tenner  says: in response to Don Tennant

Will ensure Infosys shuts US ops: Jack Palmer

Here it is at yahoo finance !

I do not understand the reason for releasing bits and pieces of some information to the media. After being called a liar with statement full of inaccuracies, falsehoods and exaggerations (not my words... But of the management at the highest level - supposedly from a company which has always run shy of media campaigns ), he promised that he is not ready for settlement and would like to see case to the end. In fact you yourself have written that there is multiagency criminal investigation under way.

Are you not obstructing the course of those investigations (?) with these type of releases ? It looks very fishy to me ...

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Aug 8, 2011 5:25 AM asfsf@gmail.com asfsf@gmail.com  says: in response to R. Lawson

What you are claiming to be some kind of law - does not exist.

May be you dreamed it up.

Bet you 1000 bucks cash - show or provide link to any law stating this.

"It's very simple.  If you are charging for services rendered while on the B-1 visa, you are breaking the law .  The government created this visa so that companies could conduct business transactions (such as meetings and inking deals) without meeting stricter requirements found in the H-1b visa (like prevailing wage requirements).

I am waiting.... (B1 visa is legitimate business visa - who pays for what has never been legislated by Congress - just to provoke vitriolic campaign - we can not invent laws) Rather than calling it silly - I hope you can educate urself and stop misinformation campaign.

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Aug 8, 2011 5:36 AM Don Tennant Don Tennant  says: in response to tenner

Amazing. It appears what happened is that the Indian press reported that Palmer wanted to see the case to the end rather than accept a settlement after he was called a liar by Infosys, and that's true. The headline writer took "see it to the end" and apparently thought that meant "see Infosys end its operations in the U.S." and wrote the headline to reflect that. It may have been an innocuous language problem, but it's still inexcusable. In any case, if you get past the headline and read the article, you'll see that Palmer never said anything about ending Infosys' U.S. operations. It was an unfortunate, amateurish mistake by the Indian journalists.

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Aug 8, 2011 5:53 AM chm chm  says: in response to asfsf@gmail.com

Any statement from Lawson starts with "It's very simple." - just ignore that.

Anything he can't grasp he gives his "simple solutions". He doesn't understand much complexities. However he is nice sane gentleman though unlike many others here. Its true for any person without much knowledge in certain fields. Same with sports - you will see people who don't understand anything about complexities about sports gives all kind of simple solutions to coaches and players. Same with politics, law etc. People give lecture to all the time. Sometimes people call their doctors stupid too as if they know more medical science :P. These kind of characters are very common over "comment" section in any forum - don't get excited and bet 1000 $ He is just a 'simple' person in a complex world :P

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Aug 8, 2011 6:02 AM R. Lawson R. Lawson  says: in response to asfsf@gmail.com

There are exemptions to the B1 rule that can be applied for, but under normal circumstances "work" cannot be conducted on the B-1 visa. 

I didn't dream this up - the Department of State makes the rules very clear:

travel.state.gov/pdf/BusinessVisa.pdf

And according to Law Offices of Rajiv S. Khanna, P.C - a firm specializing in immigration law "It should be noted that an alien entering the U.S. with a B visa must not engage in gainful employment (labor for hire) in the U.S.  Additionally, the undertaking of an academic study program is not permitted (with a few limited exceptions)."

www.immigration.com/visa/b-visa/b-visa-overview

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B_visa

So unless you disbelieve this immigration attorney and the State Department, and just about every other professional I have discussed this matter with I think you owe me $1000.  Cash is good, but I'll also take credit card or PayPal.  Please contact me offline so we can expedite your payment.

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Aug 8, 2011 6:06 AM R. Lawson R. Lawson  says: in response to chm

PayPal has a very SIMPLE means of payment.  asfsf isn't going to welch on his offer now is he?

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Aug 8, 2011 6:26 AM TT TT  says: in response to chm

I agree with you here, Lawson is full of energy but lack of knowledge. He expects an organization should also involved in babbling like an individual in media to show their credibility. But kids often forget that these monsters dont give a damn about individuals and are focused on their business, they might end up happily paying millions at the end. They dont need to come forward and crib in public!

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Aug 8, 2011 7:09 AM asf asf  says: in response to R. Lawson

Looks like typical of Mr Jack Palmer - you don't read what you post.

Read what the State department has to say about B1 visa. Read under training. No payment of any kind is permitted. Does it say

"It's very simple.  If you are charging for services rendered while on the B-1 visa, you are breaking the law . "

Where does the PDF say that .... Either I am unable to read or you are blowing wind.

Incidentally That takes care of Don Tennant's anonymous whistlers and Jack Palmers  that B1 visa were not getting paid and no taxes were getting deducted. Obviously business visas are for short term. The only criteria that state department has explicitly laid down is this.

No salary will be paid - Now for the type of work. If you notice even in the bits and pieces of mail excerpts - there is no mention of what was being done./

"[Mr. X]'s 45 day onsite contract is creeping upon us.  He is scheduled to return to India October 18th. Since CRP1 got pushed to Oct 20-21st I believe it would be in our best interest to have on site for CRP1.  Would it be possible to request an extension for him to Friday October 22nd?" What does this even mean - agreed that mail writer may not even know what the details of visa are.

The fact is mail writer knows limited availability of Mr X. Which is explicitly permitted under training or even sales or business related conference ...

I know people want Indian companies to pay for 9/11 fire fighters, for securing mexico border, ffor contributing to social security benefits to ever one - but I think selective interpretation and enaction of law to target particular business group based on racial profiling is a bit too much

What do u say.

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Aug 8, 2011 7:10 AM R. Lawson R. Lawson  says: in response to TT

So after I cited both the State Department and an immigration firm on B-1 rules I'm the one lacking knowledge?

Do you guys even care to read the law?  Your comments are just mind boggling.

"He expects an organization should also involved in babbling like an individual in media to show their credibility. "

So are you describing what Jay Palmer's attorney has said as "babbling"?  Infosys stepped into the fray the moment they described Jay Palmer as a "liar" despite evidence released in this same site substantiating what Jay and his attorney are saying.

I am losing my energy to continue debating people who won't simply look at the facts.

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Aug 8, 2011 7:14 AM tenenrqw tenenrqw  says: in response to Don Tennant

Sir

With all due respect - I think you are interpreting stories as you would like them to be or perhaps how you would like to see them to be.

If some thing becomes too vitriolic - like Jack Palmer throwing all kind of company policies to the win - then you call that as over enthusiastic or amateurish.

You can not adjust the truth to suit your own convenience. That is why in court of law - they require people to submit on affidavit. so that they can go after them if there is miscarriage of justice.

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Aug 8, 2011 7:16 AM hireamerica hireamerica  says: in response to asf

It says this is what you can do. Anything else is illegal. Simple as that.

We know how to read OUR laws.

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Aug 8, 2011 8:30 AM Jake_Leone Jake_Leone  says: in response to tenenrqw

I think you need to read Jay Palmers testimony.

I think you need to understand that we are free to reason about what is going inside InfoSys. 

So pardon us if we choose to actually think.

I am sure InfoSys is doing a lot of thinking about this right now.

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Aug 8, 2011 9:55 AM chm chm  says: in response to R. Lawson

I won't google too much like you so posting from here.

Lawson ~ "If you are charging for services rendered while on the B-1 visa, you are breaking the law ."

Rajiv S. Khanna ~ "It should be noted that an alien entering the U.S. with a B visa must not engage in gainful employment (labor for hire) in the U.S."

SaraR ~

"This part doesn't seem to be right....any person come here for client meetings (any meetings for that matter) has to be paid by the client if the contract requires it. You cannot expect people work on a project free of cost just because he/she is on B-1. "

You do the math...or may be you can't

You were saying about employer can charge or not. Anyway may be little complex for your simple mind to connect the dots. Leave it.

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Aug 8, 2011 10:04 AM chm chm  says: in response to chm

The case is about if Infosys asked employees to fake invite letter and bring people in B1 visa using backdoor or not. Not what you are saying here. There is a big chance Infosys will be found guilty but not for what you are interpreting. Even if Infosys comes out as guilty - you'll be like a small kid - "I Win! I Win!" - but you'll still have totally wrong understanding of the case.

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Aug 8, 2011 10:32 AM Chamat Chamat  says:

I doubt if emails are considered as any sort of evidence in the court. All I know is that one can make any email from anyone (Manish, Ravi etc) in MS outlook and the only way to validate its authenticity is to get a copy from exchange server.

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Aug 8, 2011 12:26 PM ctrl alt del ctrl alt del  says:

I'm looking forward to the continued release of these emails....

I wonder how long it will take for Infosys to apologize, if at all

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Aug 8, 2011 12:32 PM R. Lawson R. Lawson  says:

Jay has been a good sport with Infosys - but clearly all bets were off the day they called him a liar.

@Chamat - of course emails are evidence in court.  They are used all the time.  What planet do you live on?  Nobody (but you apparently) is arguing that these emails are fake.

"All I know is that one can make any email from anyone (Manish, Ravi etc) in MS outlook and the only way to validate its authenticity is to get a copy from exchange server."

That's a good point that you have raised Chamat.  The DOJ should immediately get a search warrant on all Infosys Exchange servers and emails relating to this case.  If it is found that Infosys has deleted emails or done things outside their normal policy to hide or conceal evidence, the conspiracy charges and obstruction of justice charges will only grow.  The cover-up often leads to more time in prison than the crime itself.

If the DOJ had Infosys Exchange servers one can only imagine what would be discovered.

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Aug 9, 2011 1:44 AM B-1 Question B-1 Question  says: in response to F.Y.I

Who are the risks, liabilities, penalties, and contacts regarding B-1 visa misuse in employment?

-  Am I at risk, and is my company liable for illegally hiring B-1 visa workers through an offshore contracting company?

-  Are these risks subject to Sarbanes-Oxley compliance disclosure?

- Can an individual report suspected B-1 visa misuse at their worksite or another place they do business  (e.g. a partner or local retailer)?

- What penalties do clients of foreign contracting firms face for hiring B-1 visa workers - and are they expected to conduct due diligence to ensure compliance (e.g. employers are required to meet OSHA compliance for the workforce, including contractors)

 

- Can this problem be solved by using e-Verify? 

- What is the process to report suspected B-1 visa violations? Which law enforcement agencies are involved?  Local? USCIS? DOJ?  DOL?  EEOC?  

- And, can individuals report suspected B-1 visa violations to authorities without hiring an attorney?

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Aug 9, 2011 4:05 AM Fraud Detection and National Security Hotline Fraud Detection and National Security Hotline  says: in response to hireamerica

Thanks! Just found hotline to report Immigration Fraud and Abuse

Report Immigration Fraud to

US Immigration & Customs Enforcement

(ice.gov) 

Hotline - 1.866.DHS.2.ICE  accepts immigration violation reports

Fraud Detection and National Security (FDNS) Directorate

111 Massachusetts Ave NW, Suite 702

Mail Stop 2280 

Washington DC 20529-2280

FDNS@dhs.gov

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Aug 9, 2011 8:43 AM Wakjob Wakjob  says:

As someone who lived and worked in Silicon Valley for 16 years before being run out of the state by Indian, Inc. i can assure you this type of fraud is ramapant and totally out of control.

Google "PhDs for sale in Punjab". In India you can simply buy a PhD for $350 never having attended the 3rd grade and then simply fly into America and drop into a $150K/year job.

And we wonder why our economy is falling apart! In 1998 when Americans were running Silicon Valley, the US economy was booming out of control.

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Aug 9, 2011 10:40 AM shamelessWakjob shamelessWakjob  says: in response to Wakjob

Welcome back Mr.Shameless racist wakjob.....

It seems it is costly in India to get PhD....but in US for cheating your teachers are rewarded by federal government.

It is declared legal way now in US...you get bonus of $2000 for cheating...is it great...and you will see those kids with great scores with zero knowledge competing with you in next few years...

There is huge scam going on in US education...undermining hard working kids and teachers' effort.

We call it as American way of cheating...in India you have to pay to cheat...in US you will be paid to cheat...

www.cnn.com/2011/US/08/05/atlanta.public.schools.scandal/index.html

Just part of the news...for you to know...

"At an Atlanta school with the highest pass rate, every employee -- from the custodian to the principal -- got a $2,000 bonus. High scores also contributed to the success and prestige of Hall, who made tens of thousands of dollars in bonuses during her tenure as superintendent, according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, and was named 2009 National School Superintendent of the Year. At the state level, high CRCT scores helped Georgia compete for federal funding from programs like No Child Left Behind and Race to the Top."

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Aug 9, 2011 10:46 AM ShamelessWakjob ShamelessWakjob  says: in response to Wakjob

Google "PhDs for sale in Punjab". In India you can simply buy a PhD for $350 never having attended the 3rd grade and then simply fly into America and drop into a $150K/year job.

--you Americans are so dump to accept anyone as employee and pay them $150k/yr without even evaluating their qualification...if you can't figure out unqualified person in a 15mins discussion you are good to be cheated..because you are one worthless idiot who can't figure out people with PhD degree. If you are so dump you got to be cheated no excuses. That is how Madoff could run Ponzi scheme for $60 billion....and these dump people claims they are smart, innovative, non-racist and want job in IT...no wonder you get fired and screwed.

If you still believe on snake oil scheme better get cheated...rather than crying for getting cheated.

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Aug 9, 2011 11:08 AM ShamelessWakjob ShamelessWakjob  says: in response to ShamelessWakjob

It is not only part of Atlanta...you can see similar cheating in Philadelphia

"What I did was wrong, but I don't feel guilty about it," said a veteran Philadelphia English teacher who shared her story with the Notebook/NewsWorks.

What a great nation...they agree it is wrong but they don't feel guilty about it...and may be they are proud about it. Worst part is they did this cheating at 11th grade and those kids are about to get into College in a year or two. Those kids who are part of this cheating got excellent score and they will be laughing at kids who got close to excellent score but did not reach to the level of those fraudulant scores. It will affect other kids life permanently (not getting the college they are suppose to get, unfair high score creates ripple effect, has to pay more fee, may not get seat in in-state etc.,)

www.thenotebook.org/blog/113913/confession-cheating-teacher

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Aug 9, 2011 11:11 AM ShamelessWakjob ShamelessWakjob  says: in response to hireamerica

Need fair chance to compete...better start studying properly and get graduated without cheating other hard working kids then you can ask for fair chance to compete for the job.

When you graduate fraudulently you come is sic brain and has nothing but ways to cheat others or use your usual racist way to kick others (blacks) out.

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Aug 9, 2011 11:13 AM hireamerica hireamerica  says: in response to ShamelessWakjob

Did you know who runs the Philly charter schools? :P

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Aug 9, 2011 11:34 AM jobs4us jobs4us  says:

Infosys supporters are feeling the heat - their naive attempts to invent or re-write US law speak volumes.

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Aug 9, 2011 11:43 AM Question about B-1 visa holder Question about B-1 visa holder  says:

What criminal and civil penalties do B1/B2 visa holders personally face when attempting to work illegally in the USA? 

Seems to me that visa holders should be held personally accountable for being informed about the restrictions to work in the USA. 

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Aug 9, 2011 11:57 AM B1 Visa Law and Penalties B1 Visa Law and Penalties  says: in response to Fraud Detection and National Security Hotline

Below are some of the laws and penalties related to B-1 visa misuse.

I am not a lawyer but suspect Infosys, its staff, B-1 visa workers, and potentially its clients, risk deportation and imprisonment. 

<!-- Misuse of visas is a deportable offense -->

www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-5672.html ;

INA:ACT 237 - GENERAL CLASSES OF DEPORTABLE ALIENS 3) Failure to register and falsification of documents... (iii) of a violation of, or an attempt or a conspiracy to violate, section 1546 of title 18, United States Code (relating to fraud and misuse of visas, permits, and other entry documents), is deportable.

<!-- Visa Misuse is a FELONY --> 

TITLE 18 - CRIMES AND CRIMINAL PROCEDURE    PART I - CRIMES    CHAPTER 75 - PASSPORTS AND VISAS

trac.syr.edu/laws/18/18USC01546.html ;Sec.1546.Fraud and misuse of visas, permits, and other documents. Subsection 1546(b) makes it a felony offense to use a false identification document, or to misuse a real one, for the purpose of satisfying the employment verification provisions in 8 U.S.C. 1324a(b)

<!-- US Visa Fraud Sec 1546 -->

www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/USCODE-2009-title18/pdf/USCODE-2009-title18-partI-chap75-sec1546.pdf

trac.syr.edu/laws/18/18USC01546.html ;

Sec.1546.Fraud and misuse of visas, permits, and other documents

Subsection 1546(b) makes it a FELONY offense to use a false identification document, or to misuse a real one, for the purpose of satisfying the employment verification provisions in 8 U.S.C. 1324a(b)

Whoever, when applying for an immigrant or nonimmigrant visa, permit, or other document required for entry into the United States...

<!-- Affidavit from B-1 Visa Holder, Infosys -->

Whoever knowingly makes under oath, or as permitted under penalty of perjury under section 1746 of title 28, United States Code,  knowingly subscribes as true, any false statement with respect to a material fact in any application, affidavit, or other document required by the immigration laws or regulations prescribed thereunder,  or knowingly presents any such application, affidavit, or other document which contains any such false statement or which fails to contain any reasonable basis in law or fact

<!-- Fines and Prison -->

Shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than 25 years 10 years (in the case of the first or second such offense, if the offense was not committed to facilitate such an act of international terrorism or a drug trafficking crime), or 15 years (in the case of any other offense), or both.

<!-- Knowledge of Visa Misuse (Infosys, Staff e.g.billing team, clients?-->

(b) Whoever uses-

(1) an identification document, knowing (or having reason to know) that the document was not issued lawfully for the use of the possessor,

(2) an identification document knowing (or having reason to know) that the document is false, or

(3) a false attestation  Reply

Aug 9, 2011 11:57 AM B1 Visa Law and Penalties B1 Visa Law and Penalties  says: in response to Fraud Detection and National Security Hotline
for the purpose of satisfying a requirement of section 274A(b) of the Immigration and Nationality Act,

<!-- Fine PLUS Prison -->

shall be fined under this title, imprisoned not more than 5 years, or both.

<!-- Looks like a number of local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies can act -->

(c) This section does not prohibit any lawfully authorized investigative, protective, or intelligence activity of a law enforcement agency of the United States, a State, or a subdivision of a State, or of an intelligence agency of the United States, or any activity authorized under title V of the Organized Crime Control Act of 1970 (18 U.S.C.note prec.3481).

Reply
Aug 9, 2011 12:15 PM hireamerica hireamerica  says: in response to chm

The bottomline is the American public want a fair chance to compete for jobs in their own country. And when that happens, yes, we will most definitely celebrate.

Reply
Aug 9, 2011 12:17 PM hireamerica hireamerica  says: in response to chm

Then that work needs to be done by a citizen or a legal permanent resident or a H1b worker. Simple as that.

Reply
Aug 9, 2011 12:52 PM F.Y.I F.Y.I  says: in response to Question about B-1 visa holder

None. I know tons of car dealers and mechanics who are illegal resident in the US, they either came on vistor visa and never went back or on some other visa. Its not that no one is aware, they are being questioned by diff govt agencies time to time but still they are working from last 10+ yrs.

Reply
Aug 10, 2011 8:30 AM Journalist Journalist  says:

None of this matters, the Obama regime favors the Indian outsourcing industry.   Infosys will likely get pardoned and be given a large bailout with US tax payer money.  Obama will make sure of it.

Reply
Aug 10, 2011 9:46 AM WE the People WE the People  says: in response to Journalist

How profoundly sad.

There's got to be a way to enforce the law and make sure highly qualified Americans who have lost our jobs, homes, healthcare, life savings, and MORE due to this FRAUD see justice. 

Imagine all the heat Clinton got into screwing Monica. This guy screws the country, hangs out with high rolling greedy billionaires while his wife eats cake in Spain...

Meanwhile, WE the PEOPLE software engineers, developers etc with advanced degrees and more are left homeless, hungry, and sick, living with our families in corporate office parking lots because of these crimes. 

Reply
Aug 11, 2011 9:55 AM GreatAmericans GreatAmericans  says: in response to Journalist

Who down graded America from AAA to AA ?

Deven Sharma, the man who downgraded US debt has emerged as an instant hero for Indians and the expatriate Indian community on social networking sites but is also facing a volley of hate messages for "destroying the global economy.

economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/news-by-company/corporate-trends/US-debt-downgrade-SPs-Deven-Sharma-becomes-an-instant-hero-villain-in-cyberspace/articleshow/9547203.cms

Reply
Aug 18, 2011 10:30 AM Roy Lawson Roy Lawson  says: in response to GreatAmericans

I personally think Deven Sharma did us a favor.  Our nation is in too much debt.  We don't even understand how much debt we hold.  We have conservatives who are (budget) deficit hawks - yet they ignore our even greater trade deficit and praise free trade.  The continue to go to the trough and rack up more debt for their pet projects.

Getting bumped down from AAA to AA isn't such a bad thing.  The silver lining is that hopefully this prompts politicians to get serious about debt.  Our country will not be stable if we continue on as usual.  Unchanged, we will experience a long series of mini recessions and find a new norm of 15-20% unemployment.

I doubt Sharma had our interest in mind, but I think that this is a fire-drill that will better prepare us for what is to come. 

People really don't think that we can continue our past way of life indefinitely do they?  Our growth is dependent on Americans not saving for retirement and accumulating personal debt.  It's a house of cards, and the foundation fell literally when our actual houses started to lose their value.

Reply
Jun 19, 2013 2:09 AM vladimir Galstyan vladimir Galstyan  says:
why not change the rule of immigration. Reply

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