Feds' Criminal Probe Puts Infosys in Awkward Recruiting Position

Don Tennant

What an awkward situation to be in. Infosys is looking to hire an attorney who would be responsible for ensuring the legal and regulatory compliance of Infosys Public Services (IPS), the U.S.-based Infosys arm that aims to get business from the government. The company is trying to fill this position at a time when the feds are wrapping up their criminal investigation of Infosys for alleged visa and tax fraud in this country.

 

On Sept. 24, IPS posted a job opening for the position of Principal Legal Counsel and Company Secretary, to be based in Reston, Va. Here's the list of responsibilities:

 

  • General responsibility for legal and regulatory compliance of IPS, including company secretarial activities (company secretarial activities represent approximately 20 percent of role).
  • Implementation and management of legal and regulatory framework applicable to federal government contractors, including Federal Acquisition Regulations, Code of Federal Regulations, and Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs.
  • General legal and regulatory advice to IPS senior management, including CEO, CFO and COO.
  • Negotiate and settle complex legal, commercial and financial terms consistent with IPS's risk management policies and delegations of authority.
  • Review and assist in preparing legal aspects of tenders and tender responses.
  • Research and advise in relation to matters relevant to IPS's business, including intellectual property protection, general corporate compliance and contracting.
  • Ensure compliance at all times with IPS's legal, financial and risk management policies and procedures.
  • Develop relationships with relevant departmental counsel and government and industry bodies.
  • Review and supervise work of junior counsel with a focus on training and development.
  • Instruct and manage external counsel in the resolution of commercial disputes and litigation.
  • Work with Infosys' Head of Employment Law on employment related issues.
  • Prepare and deliver presentations to sales and delivery personnel on legal topics of interest.

 

And here are the requirements:

 

  • JD/LLB or LLM from reputable law school.
  • Virginia/Washington, D.C. Bar Certified.
  • Minimum 11 years in-house/private practice experience in federal government contracting/company secretariat, ideally in the technology and outsourcing sector.

 

As I wrote in a July post, "Infosys Attacks Whistleblower in Wake of Senate Testimony," IPS is going on a recruiting spree with plans to hire around 800 people, apparently because the company is convinced that it's going to get a lot of business from the government. In terms of revenue, half of that business will be offshored, according to IPS CEO Eric Paternoster.


 

If IPS is successful in hiring an attorney who's desperate enough to accept a job with a company that's under criminal investigation by the same government it's hitting up for revenue, let's hope the hiree at least advises the company to keep more of that work in the United States. And let's hope Infosys has the decency to fully disclose to the candidates everything it knows about the criminal and civil legal battles it's facing.



Add Comment      Leave a comment on this blog post
Sep 27, 2011 4:39 AM Chamat Chamat  says:

Again a piece of disappointment by Don. As we understand IPS is new establishment of  Infosys and it has all type of openings. Every company will have a legal advisor and hence they recruit it, whats big deal? this is just a piece of Job responsibilities mentioned in an advertisement.  Why will somebody not accept any responsibilty if he/she thinks they can fulfil it. Only cowards and liar will have a second thought before accepting such offer.

Don took such a long time to come up with this BS is unbelievable.

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Sep 28, 2011 1:40 AM jobs4us jobs4us  says:

It is a disgrace to the United States of America to award foreign outsourcing companies jobs paid for with US taxpayer dollars. Not only are American citizens forced to train these non-US citizens for our jobs, but WE the PEOPLE, have to PAY for this fraud and abuse. 

President Obama - the buck stops here.   YOU can create US jobs for US citizens NOW.

Starting with the Federal Government - only allow US firms, and US subcontractors to hire US citizens to work on US jobs paid for with US taxpayer dollars.   And, make e-Verify a mandatory requirement for anyone to work on US federal government contracts.

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Sep 28, 2011 10:41 AM George Alexander George Alexander  says:

>>What an awkward situation to be in. Infosys is looking to hire an attorney who would be responsible for ensuring the legal and regulatory compliance of Infosys Public Services (IPS), the U.S.-based Infosys arm that aims to get business from the government. The company is trying to fill this position at a time when the feds are wrapping up their criminal investigation of Infosys for alleged visa and tax fraud in this country.

ummm, no. Nothing ackward here. This write-up would have been fine if it just had the facts but the op-ed part makes it sound like a desperate-to-find-a-juicy-story-here article. There are lots of companies that are under investigation and still deal with the government. The DoD had awarded stimulus contracts worth $30 million to 6 companies while they were under Federal criminal investigation. Was it a big deal? Nope. The Fed rules allow government agencies to terminate contracts when "it's in the government's interest" but DoD didn't feel compelled to terminate the contracts.

BTW, this article was interesting: http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9220332/Salaries_rise_for_engineers_despite_higher_unemployment_

Basically, it's a very competitive market now and companies are looking for people with real skills and are willing to pay for it. People with real skills do have jobs and satisfactory pay today. "This increase in wages happened despite an increase in unemployment among engineers last year.". As Tom Friedman put it, "There's no place for average anymore".

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Sep 29, 2011 3:56 AM Roy Lawson Roy Lawson  says:

"IPS is going on a recruiting spree with plans to hire around 800 people, apparently because the company is convinced that it's going to get a lot of business from the government. In terms of revenue, half of that business will be offshored, according to IPS CEO Eric Paternoster."

half of that (government) business will be offshored. . .

Not if I can help it.

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Oct 19, 2011 1:30 AM John John  says: in response to Roy Lawson

Why blame indian companies when american companies themselves are not serious about hiring americans. Who do you think is filling for the maximum number of green cards? its not the indian companies. The indian companies file for the H1 visa but not for residency. American companies cooly transfer the visa candidates to their company and then file for their GC. Maximum are filled by microsoft. Also I worked in a big pharma company like Genentech (Roche) . There are jobs that need work on technology that many americans can do. Yet they continue to sponsor visa for such candidates (which is for speciality fields that are not available locally) and then go ahead and file their GC also. Why don't the american companies first set the right example themselves??

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Sep 27, 2012 8:57 AM Richard Richard  says:
Don tennant you suck. You still dont ahve any update on this line "at a time when the feds are wrapping up their criminal investigation of Infosys for alleged visa and tax fraud in this country ". This criminal probe verdict was supposed to be out in the public on Sep 17 and still there is no update. Seems the matetr got buried under the carpet. Instead of brinign out facts related tot eh criminal probe you are bringing crap stories which ahve no base. Please understand that this blog is not meant for your personal stories or fancies against Infosys but to provide the audience with concrete news of what is happening on the B1 visa front. Reply

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