Executive Recruiter: 'Man Up' to Foreign Competition, Age Discrimination

Don Tennant

It's rare to find anyone with a technology background who has the fortitude to tell technology professionals what they really need to hear about the realities of getting a job in 2011. It's especially rare to find an executive recruiter with a technology background who's willing to express her lack of patience with people who blame foreigners or age discrimination for their unemployment. Colleen Aylward is just such a rarity.

 

Aylward, whose technology background dates back to the days of Dun & Bradstreet Computing, is founder and president of Devon James Associates, an executive recruiting firm in Bellevue, Wash., and author of the book, "Bedlam to Boardroom: How To Get a Derailed Executive Career Back on Track." I spoke with Aylward last week, and I found her straightforward, tell-it-like-it-is style tremendously refreshing at a time when no one seems to be willing to do much more than commiserate with the hand-wringers.

 

For starters, I asked her if she had any advice for people in the over-50 crowd who feel they're facing age discrimination in the recruitment process. Her response:

Lose weight, get a tan, start working out. I'm serious-it sounds awful to say, and no one wants to approach that subject. But like I say in my book, if you've let your body atrophy, then we just assume you've let your mind atrophy. If you take a while, and huff and puff to get across the room, can you really work in an agile environment? Maybe I'm just so geek and into high tech, and the rest of the world isn't like that, but it certainly is in technology. We love to manage by crisis, we love to multitask, we love to jump when the investor says jump. Those things speak of speed, and not thoughtful, process-oriented, group thinking.

 

In fact, we've learned, as executives, that you sit in a meeting and keep your mouth shut and listen to what everyone says, and then thoughtfully come up and say, "Let me see if I can tell you what you just said, and here are the things I think we should think about." We're trying to be diplomatic, we're trying to let the manager manage, and all that. If you're in an interview with a 30-something, he's going to say, "Dude, cut! Why didn't you blurt out the answer?" So there's a culture gap, as well. Maybe it's just the way we were trained in the white-collar professional world. We weren't trained in startups-we weren't trained to run down the hall, clean the toilets, get back here and talk to the board members, go over there and do a PowerPoint yourself. That's just a different culture.

 

But this is one of my passions -- this demographic between 50 and 65 is still a huge demographic with a huge footprint on the United States. Don't be afraid of social media, don't listen to the scare tactics. It's not that difficult-it's based on everything you were taught. It's based on logic, it's based on the numbers game-it's the same thing, don't be afraid of it. If you're not controlling it, then you're out of control.


Aylward was equally blunt when I raised the topic of the concern and resentment that a lot of tech workers feel with respect to jobs in America being taken by non-U.S. citizens:

Yeah, I have a lot to say about that. The phrase "man up" comes to mind. We have to stop bitching about all of these people coming in and taking our jobs. When I recruit, I go looking for specific technical skills, and anymore it's not necessarily because [non-U.S. citizens] are cheaper. It's because I can't find them in the white, American-bred boy who went to MIT or Princeton, and who wants $225K and two spaces for his BMW, and he wants to get off at three o'clock to go work out with friends. We really have to man up as a nation and say, globalization is here. That means it's kind of an open-door planet now. Get educated. In India, they value education very highly, and they get it, no matter what, by hook or by crook. Now, of course we can have a discussion about whether their degrees are as robust as ours are. But I don't have a lot of patience for people who say, "I don't have a job because of age discrimination," or "I don't have a job because all the foreigners are taking our jobs." For one thing, when was the last time you saw a 20-something with a degree sweeping floors, or starting at the bottom rung? There's a sense of entitlement here.

That sense of entitlement is something I've written about for years, and I share Aylward's lack of patience with it. She has some very interesting views on some other topics, as well. I'll pass them along in a subsequent post.



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Oct 13, 2011 3:09 AM hoapres hoapres  says:

>> Yeah, I have a lot to say about that.  <<

So do I.

>> The phrase "man up" comes to mind. We have to stop bitching about all of these people coming in and taking our jobs.<<

Companies have to stop bitching claiming that they have the right to hire the best qualified person on the planet.

They don't.

You only have the right to hire the most qualified American worker to do the job.

We are not talking about true geniuses.  The true geniuses can always be granted an exception.

>> When I recruit, I go looking for specific technical skills, and anymore it's not necessarily because are cheaper. <<

Nope

You are simply being too cheap.  If you don't way to pay enough money then simply don't do the job.  Legally I can't import foreign workers to pick our food but we do it anyhow.  Called illegal immigrants.

>> It's because I can't find them in the white, American-bred boy who went to MIT or Princeton, and who wants $225K and two spaces for his BMW, and he wants to get off at three o'clock to go work out with friends. <<

Guess what.

If the above was true then pay the $225K a year of take the job overseas.

>> We really have to man up as a nation and say, globalization is here. That means it's kind of an open-door planet now.<<

If you can build your product cheaper in China or India then do so and we don't have the problem of foreign workers in the US in the first place.

This should be a no brainer.

It is far more preferable to ship jobs overseas versus more people coming to the US to take a job that an American won't have.  The American is out of work in either event but in one case we have one less person in a country that is getting overcrowded.

>> Get educated. <<

Young Americans are getting educated.  They find out that getting over $50K in student loan debt and being unemployed is not a good investment.

>> In India, they value education very highly, and they get it, no matter what, by hook or by crook. <<

If it is so good in India then why not simply do the work in India in the first place.

>>  Now, of course we can have a discussion about whether their degrees are as robust as ours are. <<

They're not.

>> But I don't have a lot of patience for people who say, "I don't have a job because of age discrimination," or "I don't have a job because all the foreigners are taking our jobs."  <<

Unfortunately that is what is happening.  Age discrimination is rampant and foreigners are taking our jobs.

>> For one thing, when was the last time you saw a 20-something with a degree sweeping floors, or starting at the bottom rung? <<

I see it everyday.

>> There's a sense of entitlement here. <<

Corporations have a sense of entitlement.  They want cheap foreign labor, expect someone else to train their workforce, etc.

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Oct 13, 2011 3:29 AM Jake_Leone Jake_Leone  says:

Obviously a very biased viewpoint.  I would never trust a recruiter, their job is strictly sales.  If they can decrease cost, they can increase volume, and maximize their profit, that's all this person cares about.

Managers have limited time, and they need to build influence.  It is far easier to get someone, who on paper, looks like they can do the job, than it is to actually go through the hiring process.  And if that person is from the right family back home, well hey "2 birds with one stone".

That is why industry must be under some pressure to actually do the good work needed to get americans back to work.

Yes it is easier for a Manager, to get a contractor from an agency, or someone with the right paper, than it is to actually interview and discover talent.  One takes a few minutes, the other takes days.

It is actually easier to bring someone in on H-1b or L-1 (from a hiring manager's perspective) than to do interview.  Getting the visa, costs a few minutes of the manager's time, doing the interviews can take days.

HR does all the work on a visa and you know it.

We have a lot of fat over 50 types at my company, and we are kicking butt on IBM and Oracle.  These guys are valued for their industry knowledge and work-ethic.

This recruiter, like any hiring manager, is always looking for the easy sell.  They eye-candy, she doesn't want to actually think about the qualities that make a good software engineer.

Look, Steve Jobs was well over 50, with cancer, yet he created the biggest company on earth.  Imagine if this recruiter, and all her like-kind, would just HUMAN-UP and use their time, intellect, and grow a heart.

All it takes for evil to triumph, is for good people to remain silent. 

Key word here is "People", this man-up garbage tells us a lot about this person's true bigotted view point.

And I will always shine a big bright light on the root cause of employment discrimination in this country, whereever loud-mouth like this recruiter bigot choose to shoot-off.

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Oct 13, 2011 4:56 AM Jake_Leone Jake_Leone  says:

"Man-up" is pure saleperson sucker talk.  A comment designed to stop people from thinking, and just accept an incorrect situation. 

Discrimination won't go away because people ignore it, it will just get worse.

She makes numerous straw-person arguments, and attempts to stereotype engineers as selfish types who want to make in excess of 225k and demand 2 parking spaces.  A typical bigotted smear of the majority of engineers who are lucky to make more than 100k (in Silicon Valley).

I guess Colleen Aylward is borrowing strategy from Winston Churchill, in that the truth is so valuable, it must be covered in a vale of lies.  I think the truth may be, Colleen Aylward, would like to protect what is probably her well in excess of 225k salary and her multiple parking spots for her expensive cars.

Don, I wouldn't be so vehement, but you offer no counter-point to her blanket steretypes.  Did you go into a trance or something talking to her?

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Oct 13, 2011 9:39 AM R. Lawson R. Lawson  says:

"It's because I can't find them in the white, American-bred boy who went to MIT or Princeton, and who wants $225K and two spaces for his BMW"

I find that kind of stereotype absolutely offensive to the millions of hard working American techies who dream of the day they see something even close to 6 figures and a used BMW if they are lucky. 

Aylward is so detached from reality I don't know where to begin.  How dare she say things like this.  The irony here is that Aylward is an executive headhunter.  If she really wants to find entitlement, look in the boardroom.  There she will find people earning 400 times the salary of their average employee.  These people don't bring skin to the game - no they are robbing investors blind.

I've not seen what Aylward describes in IT - ever.  You don't need to look very hard among the executive class to find people who feel they deserve a new beamer every Christmas.

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Oct 14, 2011 4:37 AM George Alexander George Alexander  says: in response to R. Lawson

I came from a state that was run by an elected communist government. The unions crippled businesses and universities through strikes and too much red tape forcing a brain drain of skilled folks. I believe you may be referring to a "guild" though? I would cringe at unions in it's current form in IT  departments. I believe the original cause for unions were to support worker rights. So a professional guild sounds more appropriate.

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Oct 14, 2011 6:56 AM Roy Lawson Roy Lawson  says: in response to George Alexander

I don't think a union would garner popular support among IT ranks.  Nobody under 30 knows what a guild is but something guild-like would be good.

Bottom line is that whatever this "thing" is for it to be effective people would need to fund it each month with dues.  And if people are paying into something they expect something in return.

I would like to see a combination of professional standards, professional development, political action, and marketing (it worked well for realtors). 

For practical reasons I would like it to be recognized legally as a union (because laws protect unions) but I would like it to be run much differently than unions are run.  It would be union in a legal sense, but operate like a professional association that advocates un-apologetically for members' interests.

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Oct 14, 2011 8:52 AM Dolores Dolores  says: in response to Roy Lawson

Another snotty recruiter, in the driver's seat because of the current labor market demographics. And she's going to engage in sloppy thinking, snap judgements, stereotyping, and plain old meaness because she can. That's all this is. Nothing for us to take to heart. A person can always lose weight or hit the gym, but what does one do about being a mean spirited person? I'm actually glad this recruiter isn't working with me. I don't want to run with that crowd.

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Oct 14, 2011 9:30 AM Jake_Leone Jake_Leone  says: in response to Dolores

Any company that would hire Colleen Aylward is setting themselves up for a lawsuit, if she really is hiring in IT positions?

Weight has zero bearing on one's ability to do IT work.  Most engineers sit in a cube all day, so weight or physical shape have nothing to do with the job, and any recruiter that would even suggest that needs to have their IQ checked (because the recruiter is showing serious signs of dementia).

"Lose weight, get a tan, start working out. I'm serious-it sounds awful to say, and no one wants to approach that subject. But like I say in my book, if you've let your body atrophy, then we just assume you've let your mind atrophy." - Quoth the Aylward

Colleen gives new meaning to the phrase "Ass of U & Me", but in this case it's all pin the tail on the recruiter.

Programming/IT isn't Bay-Watch, and any recruiter who would make such ridiculous associations is a Corporate and public liability.

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Oct 14, 2011 11:08 AM R. Lawson R. Lawson  says:

In the bio for Aylward's book she states:

". . .What I soon discovered is that headhunting doesn't work that way. Recruiters don't "place" people. They work for employers. "

There is a common perception that recruiters represent workers.  They are essentially agents of an employer.  People look at unions and say "bah - workers don't need representation".  Corporations laugh at that silly notion, because they hire representation all the time.  They have attorneys on staff, lobbyists on speed-dial, and even AGENTS to negotiate with the people they hire.  They even have a special class of employee called a MANAGER.  Corporations ARE UNIONS.  Unions of investors.

I'm not saying "let's unionize" in the traditional sense but I am saying that the situation is very slanted.  I think we need to "professionalize" much the same way that doctors, lawyers, accountants, and even realtors have done.  We need representation because even the recruiters are clear about who it is they represent - and it isn't you.

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Oct 15, 2011 1:06 AM C. Wood C. Wood  says:

Having read the comments to date, I'm amazed that the bulk of them seem to completely miss the point of Aylward's thesis and in fact play right in to the point.  I see her point being that it does no good (and gains no one in the candidate side of the job search) to sit around and gripe about foreign competition, age discrimination, biased recruiters, etc.  These factors existget over them and apply yourself to making them irrelevant.  Even if, as the commenters suggest, these biases are wrong and employers are making bad decisions, and "weight has no bearing"how does any of that talk help you get a job?

In my experience of three searches in the last six years, the two most damaging and unproductive behaviors for a job seeker are being desperate/needy and being generic.  With the latter you never get noticed and with the former the notice is all off-putting to hiring managers and networking contacts alike.  For positive behaviors, I would not put self-righteousness or political correctness on my top ten list.  You can be correct and indignant all day long but that won't get you a job.

These commenters need to realize that taking their own advice that (a) personal appearance and first impressions should not matter, (b) corporations are villains in hiring foreign born workers, and (c) Colleen Aylward is the problem, then that advice will get them nowhere because it all amounts to wanting the world to conform to their way of thinking.  In the job market, you are the product and the companies with jobs are the customers.  You have to meet the customer where he is, not where you wish he would be.  And if you think that Aylward is wrong, then go prove it by finding the customers who are hiring based on your values, not theirs. 

To my way of thinking, the hostility and defensiveness of the reactions suggests that Aylward has gotten too close to the truth for some reader's comfort.

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Oct 15, 2011 1:37 AM Dolores Dolores  says: in response to C. Wood

I don't care how bad it gets, I'm not willing to send my resume to one of the Heathers. We have all but legalized discrimination in this country if we fall for this. Whatever happened to "bona fide occupational qualification?" Anyone remember that phrase?

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Oct 15, 2011 5:35 AM Jake Leone Jake Leone  says: in response to C. Wood

What was written in this blog, is that people who do not lose weight, get a tan are deemed as mentally unfit.  Clearly, that is a complete incorrect and untrue sick-bigotted stereotype, and is undefensible, and cannot go unanswered and needs to clearly shot-down as complete wrong.

If you think you can defend it, then by your logic, if employers wanted all thin, well tanned, bikini clad factory workers that would perfectly all right (because if that's what the boss and customer want, then that's all that matters) and the people (Workers, citizens, job applicants) would all be wrong in even pointing this out AS WRONG.

No, that is not how it works.  Doing it that way has been proven, in public legal proceedings, over-and-over-again, to be completely incorrect.

And being silent about it, is even worse.  Do you think, for an instant, that we would have had civil right legislation, if people had not stood up, publicly, to work to end discrimination?  I don't think so.

Numerous, and costly, law suits through the last 2 decades have given responsible employers guidelines on this.  Discrimination based upon physical attributes, such as weight, how tan you are actionable as employment discrimination in the United States.  In any job, where such factors are irrelevant, and IT is one of those.

And employment discrimination can, in the end, be very costly to a corporation.

Letting one idiotic employee or recruiter (in this case) engage is such sick banter can cost hundreds of thousands, sometimes millions of dollars.

Look, I have been employed for nearly 20 straight years, in IT (since leaving my machining career), I know what it takes to get  job and to keep a job.  And listen, technically I am obese, any fool recruiter who puts up bologne such as what was written here in this blog, needs to be made to answer. 

And needs to have a bright shown upon their public statements of bigotry.

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Oct 15, 2011 5:41 AM Roy Lawson Roy Lawson  says: in response to C. Wood

"  I see her point being that it does no good (and gains no one in the candidate side of the job search) to sit around and gripe about foreign competition, age discrimination, biased recruiters, etc.  "

We live in a democracy where it is up to the people to shape our future.  From a pragmatic perspective - of course griping won't help find that next job.  I agree.  But people here aren't griping to employers - no they are griping to policy makers.

I'm thinking about our profession and our long-term prospects as a nation - not the next gig.  Our nation has survived hundreds of years and ideally will survive for hundreds more.  I want our profession to have long-term viability as well.

It's extremely important that we discuss these issues.  It's important that our representatives know that the "shortage shouting" is just industry hype and that their guest worker policies are having a negative impact on working people.

So I really do take exception to you people who say "shut up, it's futile".  That is a defeatist attitude and if Americans have a defeatist attitude this nation and democracy around the world is certain to fail. 

Business people complain about corporate taxes, never mind that at the end of the day most companies pay no federal corporate taxes.  We can't seem to shut you guys up about that.

What I find really funny is Caine's 9-9-9 plan and how that would really be a massive tax hike for corporations.  They miscalculated politically by claiming the "35% corporate tax" because a flat tax of 9% will appear as a massive tax decrease when in reality it will be a exponential increase for most corporations - since most pay no federal taxes.

F-ing idiots weren't happy with an effective 0% tax rate.  Be careful what you wish for.

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Oct 15, 2011 7:42 AM Dolores Dolores  says: in response to Jake_Leone

I was also thinking of that old saying about the word "assume" - now I'm not saying that I don't work on my appearance and personality, because my IT specialty involves facing customers. But I've seen young IT people who were fat and pasty - and employed and cherished because of what their minds could do. A good team has a variety of demographic factors, because the talent is all over the place. It should be all about what people bring to the job that needs doing. You're right, IT isn't Baywatch. Who put these recruiters in charge at the gate anyway? That mentality sounds like middle school all over again to me.

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Oct 15, 2011 9:16 AM hire american hire american  says:

"When I recruit, I go looking for specific technical skills"

And she gets a tonne of resumes from foreigners that add fake experience, the resumes change per her requirements and she never gets a clue :P

"For one thing, when was the last time you saw a 20-something with a degree sweeping floors, or starting at the bottom rung? "

You will definitely not see that in India,LOL. In India, we have a billion dirt poor people to do all of that work. In fact, we don't even have to get our own drink of water, the servant maid will get it for you. Heck you don't even have to take your plate to the sink after dinner. You just leave it on the dinign table and the servant will take it away for you :P

"can you really work in an agile environment?"

What Agile environment?  Obviously she has never worked in an actual work environment. It's pretty much "fly by the seats of our pants", LMAO!!

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Oct 15, 2011 11:00 AM Colleen Aylward Colleen Aylward  says: in response to Jake_Leone

Hmmm, I'm having a bit of trouble figuring out your point in this rant, but I'll try to reply as best I can.   This response to the post, like some of the others here, is filled with caustic, emotional remarks that belie the growing anger issues about the economy (and of the equality) in the US today.   I see this every day in my clients (who, by the way, are the job-seeking executives and not the employers).   

People are frustrated about the tenuous nature of their job, or their unemployment situation, or the fact that someone is making more money than they are. Families are angry that libraries and social services are closing down and that school tuition is going up.  And workers are angry that management gets raises but they don't-and angry that certain entities are bailed out by the government but there are still no jobs.  Those who had planned to retire are angry about broken promises and facing 10-15 more years of hard work.

Basically it is the fear that we are individually losing power and control over our own lives and futures.

I get this, since I live with the same frustrations. But don't make things worse by ranting about things you haven't researched, or didn't want to hear correctly, and by puffing up with all this indignation and self-righteousness about your body type.  For crying out loud, here is the page from my book that Don is referring to:

"  And now we've arrived at the subject of age discrimination, or "ageism" which I promised you back in Chapter 6 that I would address here.

Age is both an asset and a liability.  

I have rented a home to four people in their twenties. They are full of life and hope and self-confidence and newly acquired educational knowledge. I would not hire any of them. 

Why? Because my practice is all about executive level business people, and not one of these young people would be able to relate to your experience, your accomplishments, your career goals, your setbacks, or the pressure you're under right now.

So, yes. I discriminate against them because I think they couldn't do the job. They could learn the scripts, but they could not empathize -- they could not really relate to you.

Energy, influence, and atrophy

On the executive level, there is discrimination as well. But is it "age" that is the problem?

I like to describe the issue as one of "energy, influence and atrophy" rather than age. 

People like to hire others who are just like them. 

If you don't match the high energy, excitement, and passion of the rest of the company, the hiring managers perceive you as having no energy, no excitement, and no passion.  Most likely, this is not the case. Most likely, you have learned over the years to think before you speak, consider alternatives before making quick decisions, do some research on solutions, and always consider the downsides of each. You call this prudence. They may call it slow. Strike one.

If you have let yourself go physically, many hiring managers may feel that your mental agility has atrophied as well. Seriously. It's not age discrimination. It's their perception of your overall energy and stamina, especially in a highly taxing position and/or one with a lot of travel and activity.  Reply

Oct 15, 2011 11:00 AM Colleen Aylward Colleen Aylward  says: in response to Jake_Leone
Strike two.

If you      don't use the language, the acronyms, the newest industry buzzwords, they may think you are outdated. Or that you have lost the drive to keep up with new things. I knew an executive who was one of the first brilliant architects of the client-server age. He went for an interview with a large software vendor, but he didn't describe his work in the newest language of distributed technology-"cloud computing." Strike three.

Companies like to hire people who bring a batch of business along with them. Or people who are well-known and have a large amount of influence. If you haven't written a book or published papers or obtained patents or been on TV for your expertise, it is imperative that you have a huge following online. Chapter 6. Enough said.

And then there are the effects of the current economic instability.

If you have more experiences than hiring managers in your area of expertise, it can be intimidating. They may think:

     

     What if he questions me on my decisions?

     What if he won't do what I ask him to do?

     What if he doesn't respect me as his manager?

     What if he calls me on my bull during a meeting?

     OR

     What if the board replaces me with him on the next layoff?

So be careful when you start to think age discrimination is taking place. 

That will just make things worse. You'll be defensive during your interviews without realizing it. And what you might perceive as "age discrimination" might be a hiring manager's response to what you project in the areas of energy, influence, and atrophy.

Stay current on your industry's products and services. Read blogs and follow companies online. Don't give up."

So, seriously, Jake...do you still want to blame Colleen Aylward for the "root cause of employment discrimination in this country?"

Man up.

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Oct 15, 2011 11:04 AM George Alexander George Alexander  says: in response to hire american

>>"For one thing, when was the last time you saw a 20-something with a degree sweeping floors, or starting at the bottom rung? "

You will definitely not see that in India,LOL. In India, we have a billion dirt poor people to do all of that work. In fact, we don't even have to get our own drink of water, the servant maid will get it for you. Heck you don't even have to take your plate to the sink after dinner. You just leave it on the dinign table and the servant will take it away for you :P

<<

Speak for yourself.

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Oct 15, 2011 11:23 AM Colleen Aylward Colleen Aylward  says: in response to hire american

Dear "hireamerican"...

Just as a heads up.... the word "agile" was around in America long before the name was used for a development environment...

It means nimble, active, alert, responsive -- able to move swiftly and in control... able to think quickly and intelligently, just as Carl Weinschenk states on your website that  "Companies' communications strategies must be agile in a rapidly evolving market."

And you might want to do some research on "my actual work history" in technology start-ups for the last 20+ years.  And here I thought you engineers were all about data and facts.

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Oct 15, 2011 11:58 AM George Alexander George Alexander  says: in response to Colleen Aylward

I don't know why some people dislike recruiters so much. I've used them a couple of times to my advantage. My experience has been that apart from all the stuff I do on the side to market myself via my blog, group activities, references and connections, recruiters act like my free sales team: they bring customers to me. Sometimes they even tell me what the customer's budget baseline is so I know exactly what to pitch for. It's been win-win-win between me, the recruiter and the customer. I keep my profile floating around and entertain any recruiter who contacts me because I know that they probably have access to some customers that I otherwise would not. So even if you don't get a customer due to some reason, you can expect your "sales team"  to contact you the moment they have a customer with a requirement.

If someone needs a job, get hold of a couple of recruiters and partner with them! Tell them about yourself and forward a crisp resume. They will build a profile for you and promote you wherever their customers have requirements. How much better could it get?

People forget that getting a job is basically a marketing effort. You and your services are the product. You may be the best product but the way you present your products and services influences the buyer aka the customer. Simple. Not at all complicated.

Colleen was basically just telling the reality of the inherent biases that a hiring person may have whether right or wrong. No one agrees with those biases so I don't think anyone should get offended. My take towards those biases if I'm really up for the job is "so what?". Put your best foot forward and show them what they would miss out on. You're a world class product. One of the moot points I've learned while working in the industry is that it doesn't matter what you say or how you say it...what matters is how it is perceived.

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Oct 16, 2011 7:56 AM hire american hire american  says: in response to George Alexander

Are you disputing this is not how it works in India? Be truthful......Did you/your family woke up in the morning and swept your own floors, did you own dishes etc without a maid.....ever?

How many times did you say 'Thank you' to the server in a restaurant while in India? How much did you tip him? Notice I did not say her, cuz 'her' was relegated to doing the dishes in the back :P

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Oct 16, 2011 8:11 AM hire american hire american  says: in response to Colleen Aylward

So when it comes to you, we have to consider your years of experience and accomplishments.

When it comes to us, you tell us to

"Lose weight, get a tan, start working out. I'm serious-it sounds awful to say, and no one wants to approach that subject. But like I say in my book, if you've let your body atrophy, then we just assume you've let your mind atrophy. If you take a while, and huff and puff to get across the room, can you really work in an agile environment":P

And about Agile environment, that was exactly my point. We used to have it, not anymore. It's all about cheap labor. How can a graduate that barely made it to a bottom rung engineering school in a third world country cope with the demands of an agile environment? And when this graduate is tasked with management, we just fly by the seats of our pants. That's reality these days.

And....I am not an engineer. No one needs an engineering degree to work in these software jobs these days....a highschooler in the US can do them. As for me, I have a permanent tan, so it's been working for me :P.

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Oct 16, 2011 8:50 AM hire american hire american  says: in response to C. Wood

What truth did she get close to?

Is it the fake resumes? The cheap labor that corporations prefer? The bribes that Corp managers get from Indian recruiting companies? articles.nydailynews.com/2011-06-21/local/29704388_1_padma-allen-citytime-payroll-project-technodyne

There was a time when folks in this country shuddered at the thought of the IRS. Now IRS, Homeland security etc are a joke. We have illegal aliens attending Senate immigration hearings in the Senate office buildings in Washington DC in plain sight :P

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Oct 16, 2011 9:07 AM George Alexander George Alexander  says: in response to hire american

>>Are you disputing this is not how it works in India?

You bet I am. I've understood one thing - ever since you migrated to the US, you've been out of touch with India and have a steriotype like most ignorant Americans. Do you know that there is a huge class of people that live in apartments in India that do not avail of these options because they are the migrative and very much independent?

>>Be truthful......Did you/your family woke up in the morning and swept your own floors, did you own dishes etc without a maid.....ever?

This used to happen in my grandparents place and they passed away in the early 90s. In my family and my cousins, everyone cleans their own dishes (no dishwasher), my mom sweeps the floor and no one takes their car to the car wash. What you speak of is the British legacy that hung around probably till in our parents' generation. With urbanization, this is slowly changing and it is the really rich who have these options availed. The only time I can recollect we had a maid servant was when my brother's family had a baby and the mother needed help. My aunt had an operation and then they got a maid servent. Infact, now that I think about it, the only times members of my family have availed of this is when there were some situations where they couldn't do it on their own - health reasons, nursing etc. AND THEY ARE NOT CHEAP.

And this profession isn't as low as you make it to be - it's pretty expensive and very hard to get people too.

>>How many times did you say 'Thank you' to the server in a restaurant while in India? How much did you tip him? Notice I did not say her, cuz 'her' was relegated to doing the dishes in the back :P

Again, speak for yourself. I seem to think that you've grown up in a spoilt environment. Even back in college, me and my friends used to give a 10% tip and now that I'm in the US, I give 20% tip. Apart from that, we just didn't say "thank you" to people at a restaurant...we become friends with them too and we call them by the respectable buddy titles ("Cheta" if you understand Malayalam or "Anna" when I was in Tamil Nadu). The fact that you restrict your conversation with a waiter or someone in the service industry to just a "thank you" speaks pretty much about YOUR upbringing. My wife was a bit embarrassed when I go out of my way to joke with the waiter and anyone in a retail store to strike up a conversation. But I explained to her that these people meet thousands of people everyday who typically ignore them and don't treat them like a normal person. She understood that one day when one of the waitresses replied back by saying "you guys made my day" for simple humor. The guys at the local Five Guys here know me as the only Indian who is a regular beef burger guy and the cashier at the Kennedy Fried Chicken outlet where I used to have my lunches when I worked in Brooklyn jokes with me that KFC shutdown over there ever since I become their customer. You see, I don't know about you...but I try to make friends whereever I go and no matter what they do.

It seems you have a very interesting upbringing where looking down on the service industry was the norm. Just speak for yourself, ok?

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Oct 16, 2011 9:27 AM hoapres hoapres  says: in response to Colleen Aylward

>> Age is both an asset and a liability.  <<

Not when you are looking for an IT job.

>> Why? <<

Sounds like you really don't place people in IT jobs but executive positions.

>>  Because my practice is all about executive level business people, <<

Which is NOT placing people in IT jobs.  I doubt that you place people as senior architects, software engineers, systems administrators, etc.

>> If you haven't written a book or published papers or obtained patents or been on TV for your expertise, it is imperative that you have a huge following online. <<

No is not imperitative for you to have huge following online.  You definitely need to market yourself.  One of the reasons I tell people that are not supersmart to get out of IT all together is that unless you are really passionate about doing it then you are going to have to end up being a salesman like everybody else. 

>> So be careful when you start to think age discrimination is taking place. <<

And you should be careful about saying it doesn't exist.  I doubt that you worked a single day in a production software engineering environment.  I think most of your advice is geared to those looking for $250K+ senior level general executive positions and not relevant to those looking for IT jobs.

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Oct 16, 2011 9:34 AM hoapres hoapres  says:

>> It's especially rare to find an executive recruiter with a technology background who's willing to express her lack of patience with people who blame foreigners or age discrimination for their unemployment. Colleen Aylward is just such a rarity. <<

Got it wrong again Don.

Colleen Aylward is a recruiter that specializes in high level management type jobs in the $100K range and are hardly IT.  You have to define IT carefully but I am defining it as software engineers, systems administrators, web developers.

Nothing against Ms. Aylward but she is not involved in staffing the run of the mill IT project with people making between $20 to $60 an hour on contract or $40K to $80K a year.

We are talking about Apples (being general level executive types_ versus Oranges (being people in the trench doing IT)

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Oct 16, 2011 10:04 AM Dolores Dolores  says: in response to Colleen Aylward

I spent 10 years providing services to the top executives of a major (famous, Nobel prizes, etc.) interntional research university. I know what Colleen means about the energy - they absolutely crackle - but there's more to it than that.

For the most part they are merely presentable as to appearance. Their fashion sense is usually in a safe rut. And I can't think of a one of them I'd like to see in a bathing suit, and that includes the ones who bike and hike, etc.. Many are outright "schlumpadinkas" as Oprah would say. No small percentage are portly around the middle.

Their energy does differentiate them from us mortals, but that's the only physical difference I can see. To get where they are, they needed intellectual and emotional stamina, not physical looks as much. They seem to be aiming for a safely well-groomed and presentable business appearance, not Dorian Gray.

I suspect the same can be said of many corporate cultures.

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Oct 16, 2011 10:54 AM Roy Lawson Roy Lawson  says: in response to hoapres

">> If you haven't written a book or published papers or obtained patents or been on TV for your expertise, it is imperative that you have a huge following online. <<"

I've got to agree with Aylward on at least one point.  Although I'm not personally writing a tech-book (primarily because tech books have a short shelf-life, have small payouts, and are very time consuming) I think that establishing yourself as a professional is important.

I run a user group, speak publicly, blog occasionally, and network.  I may write a technology book eventually, but it will be something with a longer shelf-life.  In any event, I think that recognition among my peers has paid off.  This has helped increase my billing rates and reduce the time between projects.

I'm not thrilled with Aylward's portrayal of IT pros as "spoiled white boys" because I think it is wrong and frankly disrespectful.  But, I think there are some things we can learn from Aylward - like advice in regards to networking, business acumen, and such.

I don't dislike recruiters (well, I find the junior recruiters who think they know it all a bit annoying, but I actually try to spend some time helping them get their bearings).  They serve an important role in the IT profession.  Aylward says the things other recruiters are thinking - so soak it up.  Understanding people you do business with gives you an upper hand.

Networking has reduced my own need for a recruiter - I haven't been placed by a third party in a quite a while.  So if you want to cut out the recruiters, take Aylward's advice and gain some industry recognition.  Building a network is super-important IMHO.

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Oct 16, 2011 12:11 PM jake_leone jake_leone  says: in response to Colleen Aylward

You know Colleen, if you are not working to correct discrimination, if you are letting it go where ever it occurs.

Then you are part of the problem.

All Evil needs is for good people to remain silent.

So, Human-up.

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Oct 16, 2011 12:16 PM hire american hire american  says: in response to George Alexander

I do visit quite often and do know how it is like in India, even today. Yes, these days incomes have grown for the lower classes but then that is in tandem with everyone else. Everyone's income levels have risen a lot in the last few years, but the basic setup is still the same. The lower class people still live in filthy slums. There is the Indira Gandhi housing scheme but then it is very rare that these projects are completed. The only ones completed are for publicity. Most of the time, the building contractors siphon the money from the program and never actually complete the construction. So people still end up living in slums.

The vast majorty of the billion plus Indian populaton is dirt poor, and the only way they can make a living is by doing anything and everything for those that can pay them enough to feed themselves. That is the reality in numbers.

I have seen and stayed in urban apartment complexes. Only two years ago I have seen the watchman get beatup by one of the tenants just because the watchman requested the tenant to move his car which was blocking other tenants' cars from being able to get out of the building. The only way that the tenant stopped from killing the watchman was because the watchman's wife took her two kids and put them between her husband and the tenant. It was heart wrenching to see it all. I tried to get them to file a police case, but they said nothing will get started unless you bribe the police. Typically the watchmen's wives work as servant maids in the apartment building. Not to mention, they have to work for free in the apartment of the apartment association's president :P.

I am well aware of the realities that exist. Due to reservations in the college system and government employment, things have improved a lot for the lower classes. But, unfortunately, we have a long way to go.

I grew up in schools run by Christian missonaries. I had to do everything for myself, no servants, only staff that helped us do our work.

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Oct 16, 2011 12:26 PM Colleen Aylward Colleen Aylward  says: in response to R. Lawson

Now we're getting somewhere.   Yes, you're right.  In this economy it is the Employers who are in control of the employment situation.  In the 90's it was the job candidates (especially developers) who could name their price, since investors were pumping money into start-ups and demanding a quick return.  Today employers can be very selective and even pay less than the job used to pay, because there is a glut of candidates available out on the market, OR those who would move to a new employer for more money or health benefits.  Supply and demand.

I don't think our employment market will ever go back to "the way it was" where employers were hiring for the long haul and very loyal to their employees, and when employees were very loyal to their employers and were committed to staying for 10-20 years.  It's not a good or a bad thing... not something to whine about... it's just that time marches on and things change and adjust.

When I work with executive job seekers, this is a hard concept for them, but you are touching on it here in the blog.   Employers aren't hiring generalists any more who can learn the ropes for the first 6 months and then contribute to the bottom line for the next 10 years.   Employers are hiring problem-solvers in the management ranks who can jump in immediately, solve a problem that they have solved a dozen times before, and affect the bottom line in short order -- problem-solvers who can keep the company afloat and the shareholders happy.

The rub is that executives don't want to keep doing the same thing they've done over and over.  They figure they've proven themselves and want new challenges. 

(And that is the subject for an entirely new blog post.)

So in a way, the engineers, the developers -- the subject matter experts, if you will -- may have an employment edge for the next few years over management candidates who may have "climbed" themselves out of a job and are too far from the concrete to be of immediate value.

But you mention a Guild type of organization and if you look around you, those have been started already by companies like Volt and Infosys and GrapeCity and the Cobalt Group (now ADP) and Cap Gemini and all the firms who will "bench" or employ technology people and rent them out to employers on contract for a hefty margin.

You might think about that as a model for yourselves, run by yourselves, but you'd be competing with some pretty established organizations. 

Again... fodder for yet another set of blogging.

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Oct 16, 2011 12:27 PM hire american hire american  says: in response to jake_leone

Could not have said it better, Jake.

Get a tan? That was a bold statement, I must say. What if you do not want to sleep on a tanning bad?

What if you don't want to have it all, and just want a simple life. What if you want to get married, have and raise kids and need a job to support you and your family? Don't we have a choice? Do we have to remain unmarried for fear of keeping up so we can have a job? :P

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Oct 17, 2011 4:11 AM hire american hire american  says: in response to Madagasper

For the vast majority of Indians, the reality is that the Indian government thinks everyone who earns more than Rs. 579 per month in Urban areas and Rs. 447 per month in rural areas are rich and only those earning less than the stated amounts are "below poverty line"

That works out to $12/month in Urban areas and $9/month in rural areas. I can't even bear to calculate their hourly wages on a 40 hour work week.The poor in India work much longer hours than 40/week. Globalization is nothing but manipulating the poor so a select few can line their pockets :P

www.righttofoodindia.org/pds/pds_protest_planning_commission_poverty_line.html

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Oct 17, 2011 9:09 AM Roy Lawson Roy Lawson  says:

Granted Aylward is a recruiter and not an economist, but we hear this thoughtless mantra time and time again:

"We really have to man up as a nation and say, globalization is here. That means it's kind of an open-door planet now. "

We may be a planet with robust global trade, but Aylward hasn't really been listening to the protests over global trade given this comment.

Most people are not saying "close the doors" or suggesting America becomes an isolated nation economically or politically.  We are however complaining about India and China's currency manipulation that gives them an unfair trade advantage - not to mention a host of other disparities. 

Some of us are complaining about the unbalanced immigration policies between the United States and India.  Millions of Indians are working in the US and are granted rights we could never dream of having in India - including labor protections.  Then there is the matter of property rights to foreigners.

There are great disparities that give our trading partners unfair advantages.  And our massive trade deficits (even in services) with all major trade partners is evidence of that.

So the mindless mantra of "globalization is just a fact" is why we have these problems in the first place.  People don't get the basic notion that the things we take for granted in this nation like a minimal wage, the right to free speech, protection of the environment, labor rights, and so on comes with a premium.  It cost money to do the right thing. 

Conversely, you also save money when you do the wrong thing.  It would be cheaper (short-term) to ignore the environment.  Our nation would be more productive if we sent the orphans back to the factories - and chained the doors.  Corporate profits would soar if unions were busted over-night and all labor rights were revoked.  We could become a mercantilist nation again by printing money and devaluing the dollar - or pegging it like China does. 

So we are rewarding countries like India and China for their cheating with massive profits and American jobs.  It pays to cheat, and so long as people like Aylward keep perpetuating the idea that we are helpless and should just shut up, cheaters will continue to win in the game of global trade.

We are a country that prides ourselves in sports.  Sports have clearly defined rules and all Americans object to cheating.  Why do we ignore the same behavior in business and in global trade?

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Oct 17, 2011 11:07 AM jake_leone jake_leone  says: in response to Roy Lawson

I agree with you on this R. Lawson.  One problem is that people often simplify the trade situation to be you are either for free-trade or against it.  But there really isn't a free-trade situation going on. 

Harley's, for example, are an excellent U.S. made product, yet they are heavily tariffed in China?  Why on Earth does China have to tariff this product?

China is creating a situation where the only way dollars can flow back the to United States is either in the form of Treasury Bills or for Raw materials.  If that's the only way you can get dollars back into the United States, you can see why the economy in the United States is slow. 

Artificially over-valuing the U.S. currency, is slowing the rate at which money flows, this in turn has a bad effect on the amount of money the Federal Government is getting through taxes.  And could have one of 2 very bad affect, one I would call the "Yeltsin at Houston supermarket" where Chinese consumers realized how ripped off they are or the other that the United States decides not to honor it's debt obligation (and we were almost there a few months ago).

What we all want is a complementary trade relationship, and an immigration policy that does not discourage the employment of americans first for jobs on U.S. soil.

Any tariff, on U.S. goods in China, has to stop, immediately.

Also when foreign outsourcing companies have U.S. engineering workforces that are 90% from India.  You know what the problem is, these companies are not even trying to hiring a U.S. citizen.  It is easier to bring in a foreign worker, than it is to do an interview process.  And unfortunately I know this to be case, and have witnessed it first-hand.

Visa - that's and HR issue.  Only cost to engineering the time it takes to make the request to HR.  You know the candidate, or have already accepted the Kick-back.

Direct local hire - several hours/days of interview, do an offer, maybe it will be accepted.

The visa a few thousand dollars, and is a fixed, certain cost (perhaps even a guaranteed return).

The Direct local hire, costs several thousand dollars of employee time, is not at all certain to work out for you.

For this reason, companies must be forced to attest that they have actually tried to look for a direct local hire, before turning the U.S. Visa system as their a means of filling jobs on U.S. soil.  Until that occurs, many body-shop, outsourcing companies, and large U.S. companies will continue to take the less costly route, even at the expense of United States and its people.

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Oct 17, 2011 12:07 PM Madagasper Madagasper  says:

This line about Indians valuing education highly is pure bull.  Indians value money.  Education is simply seen as a means to it.  If Indians could make money without education they gladly would.

How come all the Nobel Prizes in the sciences this year went to white America-born Americans?  I think Aylward should tell the Indians and Chinese to "man up".  The reality is that the American recruiters, companies, and immigration lawyers have built a sustaining mafia that perpetuates the myth of the lazy unqualified American to bring in cheap Indian and Chinese labor.

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Oct 17, 2011 12:14 PM hoapres hoapres  says: in response to Roy Lawson

SELL, SELL, SELL

SELL, SELL, SELL

Unfortunately IT has degenerated to a large extent of "the lowest of the low" and I definitely agree you need to market yourself on a daily basis.  Even if you are working then you always have to be looking for your next job.

Clearly you have to network but I don't need Aylward or anyone else to tell me that. With thousand and thousands and thousands of qualified people competing for every IT job then it is pretty obvious that you need a good network of contacts.

I don't use recruiters anymore because for the most part they just get in the way and rates have dropped so much that unless you are willing to work for under $20 an hour then you might not get a job.

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Oct 18, 2011 11:27 AM George Alexander George Alexander  says:

If you look at the top 15 hottest IT skills as per this website, it depends on the number of job postings: www.itbusinessedge.com/slideshows/show.aspx?c=93008&;slide=2

There's probably no sure way to know the exact numbers due to multiple broadcasts...

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Oct 21, 2011 4:53 AM Wakjob Wakjob  says:

Don, I've said this numerous times but you never seem to address it:

Under Federal law, Americans ARE entitled to jobs over foriegn workers.It's THE LAW.By definition Federal law discriminates against foreign workers.

Most other countries also have the same kinds of laws to protect their own citizens first.So do we.But people like you and this man-hating author are ignoring them.Title 8, Section 1182 - INADMISSIBLE ALIENS.Go read it.

Now let's pick apart what she said:

"Yeah, I have a lot to say about that.The phrase "man up" comes to mind.We have to stop bitching about all of these people coming in and taking our jobs."

Well, it's illegal as long as Americans are unemployed.The author seems to be a scoflaw.

"When I recruit, I go looking for specific technical skills, and anymore it's not necessarily because are cheaper."

Nonsense.We all know that's the reason.That and your Berzekley communist attitude that we should "spread the wealth".

"It's because I can't find them in the white, American-bred boy who went to MIT or Princeton, and who wants $225K and two spaces for his BMW, and he wants to get off at three o'clock to go work out with friends."

Wow.No man-hating going on there.What this is really all about is white American males having the earning power and prestige that other groups cannot earn on their own.So they have to take it from us rather than do anything great on their own.This is pure unadulterated jealousy.In any other country both gov't and business would be down on their knees in gratitude to us for what we created.But not in sick America.In sick America isn't only "Oh, you win again, and I lose again.I hate you.I am going to take what you have".LOL.Anyone can see right through this moron.

Paying people more than the industry avergae is how many great American companies were built.Henry Ford paid his factory workers THREE TIMES the going rate.Apple was founded the same way.All throught the 80s and 90s companies knew to get the best talent AND the best work, you had to reward people handsomely.

And the author just disproved her own assertion that money isn't the issue.She doesn't want to pay Americans because they 'demand too much'.There's also a tinge of jealousy there that American "white" IT workers can afford 2 BMWs but she can't.Make no mistake:this is all about pushing down the productive white American male - more proof that she is a man-hater.Probably some rad lib feminist hippie from the 60s who wants to help out the less fortunate by stealing jobs she didn't create and giving them to people who didn't earn them.It is ludicrous to say that the people who created the IT industry don't have the skills.We're TRAINING the imported workers for crying out loud.They're the ones without skills.I even had one QA manager from China pull me into conference room with a new trainee from India, look me in the eye and say "Our goal is to EXTRACT your knowledge" and give it to here".Yep we sure are bringing in the best and brightest and Americans don't have any skills".What a joke.

White American boys invented and created this industry long before any other demographic got involved.In fact from 1978-1998 it was 98% white American males.We worked 16 hours to create this jewel. Reply

Oct 21, 2011 4:54 AM Wakjob Wakjob  says:
We're worth $100K a year at least.

Why doesn't the author have a problem with baseball players who make $40 million a year for hitting ball with a stick?Or lawyers who make $400 bucks and hour?Or movie starts who make $20 million a movie?

Good programmers who create a good product bring in $5-$20 million per product for their employer.$100K is too much?I don't think so.

If it is, then we need to replace all Congresspeople who make $175K a year for pushing paper and all CEOs who make tens of millions for just running an ordinary business anyone can do.

Sorry, but if it applies to white American IT workers, it applies to everyone else too.

"We really have to man up as a nation and say, globalization is here."

Globalization is new form of communsim.It's taking from the productive countries and giving to the unproductive ones.Can anyone name one new industry India or China created and gave to the world?If globalization is here then why is it always Americans who have to do the inventing and job creating?Why don't the other countries have to create jobs and give them to US?Globalization it seems only applies to the west, and Americans in particular.

Trading with the enemy is what caused WW2.Mein Kampf is now the best-selling business book in Mumbai.These people have centuries-old hatreds against us and they need economy in order to build up their militaries.I hope the author likes WW3 because that is what she is advocating.Trading with the enemy is so dangerous, we passed a law against it during WW2 but once again the author seems to think laws don't matter.She, like most American "business leaders" is going to learn the hard way what the end result of "globalization" is.

"That means it's kind of an open-door planet now.Get educated."

That's not what US laws say.We still have immigration laws despite the kinds of fantasy worlds people like this rabid feminist communist want.And who says we are not educated?Silicon Valley was created by college dropouts, not PhDs.

"In India, they value education very highly, and they get it, no matter what, by hook or by crook."

IIT is SO bad it can't even get international accrediation.And it's nice to see the author advocates breaking any law and comitting any crime to get what they want.No wonder America is becoming so corrupt.

"Now, of course we can have a discussion about whether their degrees are as robust as ours are."

IIT can't even get accredited.Check out the video from India on YouTube where they show people buying IT degrees in Punjab.LOL.This woman has no idea what she is talking about.

"But I don't have a lot of patience for people who say, "I don't have a job because of age discrimination," or "I don't have a job because all the foreigners are taking our jobs."

She obviously doesn't understand the history of India, Britain's colonization thereof, and the resultant deep-seated hatred of whites on the part of the millions of Indians we are importing - these people get into positions with hiring authority and they deliberately deny jobs to white Americans - all because of their hangups about Britain.Talk about not being educated.Learn some history for crying out loud.

"For one thing, when was the last time you saw a 20-something with a degree sweeping floors, or starting at the bottom rung?There's a sense of entitlement here."

The entitled ones are the ones coming off the plane from India. Reply

Oct 21, 2011 4:54 AM Wakjob Wakjob  says:
What started as a program to fill a TEMPORARY worker shortage has become a defacto entitlement program for Indians.These workers were supposed to go home after the shortage.They are still here and more of them are still coming in.They have become accustomed to expecting to be able to go from not seeing a lightswitch in their lives to stepping off the plane into a $150K a year job.Talk about entitlement!Why don't these people have to come in and start on the bottom rung?Why do they get to come in without ever having worked in their lives and step into jobs Americans worked 10-20 years for.

Americans are the least entitled people in the USA.Immigrants assume they are just entitled to walk in and take anything they want.

This woman is an ignorant fool on so many levels.

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Oct 21, 2011 5:04 AM Wakjob Wakjob  says: in response to Jake_Leone

""Lose weight, get a tan, start working out."

Now we see the real problem in IT: it's the new Hollywood! That's right!

20 years ago when I started in IT it was all geeks, weirdos, nuts, loonies, crazies, people with personality problems. Who all happened to be great engineers. These are the people who created Silicon Valley. As Steve Jobs said "Here's to the crazy ones. The misfits. The rebels."

When RObert X Cringely's Triumph of the Nerds aired in the 90s it sent all the US's pretty people into a angered frenzy. Here were a bunch of geeks, weirdos, and ugly people making way more $ than the stupid pretty people. The pretty people HAD to do something - namely take over the IT industry and exclude anyone who wasn't pretty or popular. Childish people like Colleen Aylward have turned IT into the modern equivalent of the girls' popularity contest at junior high. No wonder our economy is such a wreck - the productive people who actually create things have been sidelined so the jealous losers who happen to be born with a pretty face can get their way.

Pathetic.

Message to economists and politicians: if you want to figure out why the economy can't be fixed and isn't working, this is why. We've let the equivalent of the studly high school jock who was good at footbal and girls but had to ask the nerd to write his term paper into control of IT.

People like barbie doll Brandy Barnett at TekSystems who hires people solely on how good they look:

www.linkedin.com/pub/brandy-barnett/24/a51/877

It's these kind of pretty people who are now taking their revenge on tech geeks for besting them. And the economy shows.

According to this moron, Steven Hawking should just pack it in because he is disabled. What an ignoramus!

Often times when your body atrophies you have more time to devote to studies and work. If you're out partying and being popular and socializing, you sure don't have time for code.

LOL. Does she even realize she's making a fool out of herself?

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Oct 21, 2011 5:11 AM Wakjob Wakjob  says: in response to Colleen Aylward

"What if he questions me on my decisions?

     What if he won't do what I ask him to do?

     What if he doesn't respect me as his manager?

     What if he calls me on my bull during a meeting?

     OR

     What if the board replaces me with him on the next layoff?"

The success of American IT workers has created so much insecurity among moron business managers, execs, financial and gov't people it is not even funny. Check this out:

www.independent.co.uk/news/business/analysis-and-features/michael-lewis-silicon-valley-it-really-sucks-694089.html

"I like to write books that read like novels - stories that are about big things. Obviously, Silicon Valley was a big thing. All these people from Wall Street I knew were complaining that these people in Silicon Valley were making more money than they were, or they were quitting jobs on Wall Street to go out west."

AH HA! Now we see it: massive, unbridled jealousy. That is what this is really all about! The rest of the world vs. the American Silicon Valley geek. Everyone is insanley jealous of us. So their response is to take over and push us aside. A "bozo explosion" as Steve Jobs would have said.

LOL. No - LOLZ!

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Oct 21, 2011 5:12 AM Dave Dave  says: in response to Wakjob

The only person who is making a fool of himself with immature personal attacks is you. It's understandable why you are unemployable.

Please go do yourself a favor and seek counselling.

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Oct 21, 2011 5:25 AM Wakjob Wakjob  says: in response to Dave

Alyward needs to read this:

online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703515504576142092863219826.html

So much for 'skilled'.

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Sep 12, 2013 7:33 AM Lawler Group Lawler Group  says:
As an executive recruiter myself, I can tell you that a lot of what you are saying is true. Perception is an amazing thing and little details such as weight, tan, and freshness do weigh on peoples perception. People that come in with an entitlement are also less likely to get picked as well, employers want someone who can learn and do what they tell them. Reply

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