From Mozilla Firefox to Google Chrome

Paul Mah

I posed the question of whether it was time to reconsider the use of Firefox, highlighting some performance degradation that the popular open source Web browser appears to be suffering from. Not surprisingly, a number of readers have written in and commented that they have noticed similar problems pertaining to how Firefox would intermittently "grab" all processor cycles and an inordinate amount of memory.

 

Despite various complaints and feedback, the general consensus is that the capabilities afforded by the various Firefox plug-ins are indispensible. Indeed, reader iron wil noted that some of the security-related plug-ins for Firefox actually make it more secure against potential security threats compared to other browsers. I spend a substantial amount of time reading and researching when writing new articles, however, and have found the occasional slow-downs and freezes to be extremely frustrating, as well as an impediment to productivity. I needed to switch to something better, and the obvious choice appears to be the Google Chrome Web browser.

 

I gave it a spin a couple of weeks back, and have not looked back since. I share my experience today.

 

Google Chrome

 

I've used Google Chrome intermittently for at least one year now, and the interface has always struck me as being minimalistic, yet perfectly adequate. Beyond basics such as conformance to various Web standards, what I really liked about Google Chrome is how it renders each tab as an entirely separate process.


 

This capability is a huge boon to me, since Web sites that crash do so on a per-tab basis, without pulling down their neighbors in the dreaded dynamo effect. One might point out that Firefox does remember previous tabs when it is restarted, mitigating the disruption of crashing. I sometimes hibernate my computer to write in places where no Internet is available, though - and I'd rather the loaded tabs don't crash in the first place.

 

In addition, an added benefit of running each tab as an independent process is that I am able to monitor the exact memory consumption of loading each Web site or misbehaving extension. On the other hand, I have no way of knowing the source of problems when using Firefox.

 

Extensions

 

One of the most common complaints pointed out by reviewers when Google Chrome was first released is that it doesn't support third-party extensions. In recognition of what made Firefox the leading browser that it is today, the Chrome team has since added support for third-party extensions. For now, this feature is only available in Google Chrome Beta, the version I am using.

 

I started by making a list of some of my indispensable plug-ins in Mozilla Firefox. Surprisingly, I was able to find their counterparts or extensions with similar functionality in Chrome.

 

The extensions are:

 

  • Xmarks - This allowed me to seamlessly sync my extensive bookmarks over from Firefox.
  • Read It Later - Used to flag articles to read on the move via the corresponding iPod/iPhone reader.
  • AdBlock - Given that advertising is Google's main revenue stream, I was surprised that ad-blockers exist. They do, though, and I'm happily using this on Chrome.
  • Google Toolbar - Curiously, there is no Google toolbar.

 

In a nutshell, Google Chrome has effectively become my new browser of choice since I "migrated" to it a couple of weeks back. Perhaps due to the number of extensions, which seems to have reached a tipping point, I have found switching to Chrome to be fast and easy.

 

Your experience may vary, though. I encourage SMBs looking to move away from older versions of Internet Explorer to seriously consider Google Chrome.



Add Comment      Leave a comment on this blog post
Jan 5, 2010 1:35 AM anonymous anonymous  says:

There is no google toolbar as most functionality has been moved to the omnibar.

Reply
Jan 6, 2010 1:17 AM Karan Karan  says:

I don't think people will reconsider their decision to move to chrome just it came from Google and it's a bit faster...

Considering the ergonomics i would say that the add-ons that we get in mozilla can't be compensated with the little increase in the speed of chrome!

Chrome is a newbie and has miles to go before it can develop a huge and consistent fan following as mozilla !!

Reply
Jan 6, 2010 4:47 AM Mike Mike  says:

I too have migrated recently.  The most difficult aspect of the move is becoming more used to the GC layout.  I would like to better emulate my FF in that regard.

Reply
Jan 6, 2010 5:08 AM Hue T Hue T  says:

Yeah, I was surprised too when I heard Google offers ad blockers for the Chrome browser. More like I thought it was extremely funny. That's like NBC giving viewers of their programs free TIVOs so they can skip NBC commercials. I'm sure the advertisers will love Google for letting these ad blockers exist. I'm sure Google feels if the ads are relevant enough than no one will want to block them, but if every browser has one of these blockers installed than how will they know? Most people don't like ads... period. I don't care where they come from. Google you never cease to amaze me.

Reply
Jan 21, 2011 12:17 PM VW Turbocharger VW Turbocharger  says: in response to Karan

The new feature is only available in Google Chrome Beta, the version I am using. Thanks for sharing it.

Reply
Jul 22, 2011 10:15 AM darrensy darrensy  says:

There is no difference when it comes to reliability of these browsers. But the problem is that, Firefox has too many versions and updates release but the core open source is not that best like chrome.

regards,

darren @ ipad case consultancy

Reply
Jul 22, 2011 10:18 AM darren sy darren sy  says:

There is no difference when it comes to reliability of these browsers. But the problem is that, Firefox has too many versions and updates release but the core open source is not that best like chrome.

regards,

darren @ ipad case consultancy

Reply
Mar 24, 2013 11:32 PM Samantha Samantha  says:
Hey there, I prefer Mozilla when it comes to the add-ons. Yes, Google chrome is faster but I agree with one of the previous comments - a little speed of Chrome can't replace the add-ons of Mozilla firefox. Untill Chrome has the same add-ons - I am for Mozilla! Thanks, Samantha @ International Cargo Shipping Company Reply
Mar 25, 2013 3:37 AM Internationale Spedition Internationale Spedition  says:
There is no difference when it comes to reliability of these browsers. But the problem is that, Firefox has too many versions and updates release but the core open source is not that best like chrome. Reply
Aug 20, 2014 7:16 AM alle-lkw alle-lkw  says:
I prefer Chrome (it's faster) and use also Mozila. Reply

Post a comment

 

 

 

 


(Maximum characters: 1200). You have 1200 characters left.

 

null
null

 

Subscribe to our Newsletters

Sign up now and get the best business technology insights direct to your inbox.