There Grows Talend Again: Open Source Data Company Buys ESB

Loraine Lawson
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Talend is among the smaller master data management companies, so naturally it made the list of possible acquisition targets during recent discussions of who in that space would next be acquired by a large vendor.


Talend's vice president of marketing, Yves de Montcheuil, nearly lost his all-professional tone when I asked him recently if the company's engaged in any discussion about being acquired. With just a hint of a laugh, he quickly clarified that no, that was not being discussed.


On the contrary, Talend announced this week it's on the acquiring end of M&A: Today, it announced its purchase of Sopera, a German-based open source ESB/middleware company. The data management company also revealed it'd received a $34 million investment infusion from the middle market venture capitalist firm, Silver Lake Sumeru Investment.


"Right now, we are buying, we are not being acquired. There is absolutely no plan for us to be acquired," de Montecheuil said. "With this new investment, with this new VC partner, Silver Lake Sumeru, we are really setting ourselves (up) for a very aggressive growth phase of the company. That we are being discussed as a possible acquisition target doesn't surprise me because we are a force to be reckoned with on the market."


The open source model certainly seems to be working well for Talend. Founded in 2005, with its first product launch in 2006, the company started out in data integration with Talend Open Studio. By version 2.0, Talend was striving to play with the big boys, as I wrote in 2007.


Since then it's added open source solutions for a data cleansing tool, data governance, master data management and even integration for Hadoop to its lineup. The company even managed to become the first open source vendor to make Gartner's Magic Quadrant for Data Integration Tools in 2009, after famously calling the research firm out for Talend's omission in 2008.


With this latest acquisition, Talend is adding an ESB to its stack. Though Sopera markets itself as an SOA solution provider, Talend is marketing it as an application integration solution-which Ronald Schmelzer, managing partner of the analyst firm ZapThink, told ComputerWorld may be a smarter choice. Sopera will become a division of Talend focused on application integration, and the plan is to aggressively grow that division, de Montcheuil said.


"Sopera will become a division, a business unit within Talend focusing on application integration and we intend to accelerate considerably the growth of that business to more or less replicate the model that we have used for data management, to democratize application integration, to make it much more affordable and available for many more organizations in the market," he said.


There are plans to eventually integrate Talend's data integration and management solutions with Sopera's ESB, to capitalize on the synergies between both technologies, de Montcheuil said. Over time, the plan is to offer a unified platform.


"When you are integrating through an enterprise service bus, you can add considerable value with direct connectivity to databases with the ability to transform data to filter data, to improve the data quality along the way. So adding the existing Talend to Sopera's ESB technology will make it more powerful," he said. "And conversely, data management can really use sometimes the real timeliness of an enterprise service bus, the persistence of the messaging, et cetera. So we will be able to leverage also the ESB technology within our data management solution."

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