Internet2 Breaks Speed Record

Loraine Lawson

Last week, I chatted about the coming Internet 2 and what it would take to switch users to the new infrastructure.

Well, here's something that will help: Researchers announced yesterday they sent data over the Internet2 network at 7.67 gigabits per second. I don't know why we're just now finding out about it, since they did it in December, but whatever. They reached that speed with the standard protocols. It isn't quite so impressive when you consider the IPv4's record stands at 8.8 gigabits, delivered in 2006.

But the next day, by using modified protocols, they sent the same data at 9.08 gigabits per second.

Wow.

Theoretically, Internet2 can only reach 10 Gbps. So, of course, the Internet2 consortium plans to build a new network that could deliver 100 Gbps. My guess is, a lot of organizations would upgrade for that kind of speed.

Just to give you an idea of what all this means in a more substantial way, here's how fast you could deliver a high-quality copy of The Matrix over each:

  • Current broadband: Two days
  • Internet2: Half a minute
  • Internet2, 100 Gdps: A few seconds.

Now if they can deliver those speeds with about 1 billion people using it, then that would be a good reason to convert.



Add Comment      Leave a comment on this blog post
Apr 26, 2007 1:04 AM Frank Carlos Frank Carlos  says:
Shame little else can keep up with even what we have today.Hard drives and HD DVD read/writes are so slow in comparison. Even 1 gigabit networks are under-utilized. It's fun though, seeing what might be here in 5-10 years as mainstream.I'm still awaiting my ultra thin TV that I can stick on any wall and carry around in my bag :) Reply

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