Data Integration Gone Wild

Loraine Lawson

Data integration is running amuck. It's involved in a bitter faction war over who controls it and there's so much demand, IT can't keep up, possibly leading to riots in the break room. What's more, new users are abusing and misusing ETL, then becoming disillusioned and, one assumes, casting it aside like punch cards in the 1980s.


Or, at least, that's what Rick Sherman of Athena IT Solutions thinks.


OK, I'm being dramatic, and I probably just gave Sherman, who seems very measured and rational, that flush you get when someone's taken something you said and made it sound much more sensational than you ever thought possible.


In my defense, Sherman's list of 10 data-integration trends-the good, the bad and the ugly-spun up my imagination.


Sherman has always been one of my favorite writers to follow because he writes about topics you seldom see addressed elsewhere. And, true to form, he's come up with an intriguing and unexpected list.


I know, it seems a bit late for such a list, but there's little rehashed on this list. I especially liked that he includes the good and the bad.


He's promised he'll write more about these trends in the next few weeks, which is good because they're not all self-evident. For instance, what does he mean when he writes, "Data integration continues to splinter into two partisan groups?" I suspect he's talking about IT, with data warehouse architects handling data integration in one camp and developers in another, but he could just as easily mean business users handling more integration versus IT.


Here are a few other intriguing gems from the list:

  • Data integration breaks out from the "Magic Quadrant" (repeat).
  • Operational BI adopted because data integration is too tough.
  • Battle for market share in SMBs and departmental ETL in large enterprises is between hand-coding and ETL tools.
  • 1990s Redux, i.e. data silos proliferate again.


You can find his post on his Data Doghouse blog or on special thanks to cloud/SOA/data blogger David Linthicum for tweeting this one!

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Add Comment      Leave a comment on this blog post
Jan 29, 2010 12:30 PM Rick Sherman Rick Sherman  says:

Thanks for your feedback. Like a tabloid newspaper headline you got my attention. I especially liked the 'the good, the bad and the ugly' reference because that is what data integration is if you are successful.

From an architect laying out the enterprise information blueprint and in the trenches implementing that blueprint, the 'real world' of  data integration is dirty (data silos and the associated inconsistency) rather than the 'green fields' portrayed by (some) vendors, analysts and high-level consultants.

Your feedback, as well as your readers' feedback on my follow-up articles explaining my list is welcome.

Regards, Rick

ps: maybe your help on making my titles and articles a little more exciting would make them easier to read


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