Gmail Outages Bring out the Neo-Luddite in Me


I don't use Gmail for business, which is a good thing today, given that I have been on the losing end of the intermittent outages that are plaguing Google's free e-mail service. However, I do use my Gmail account for a variety of reasons -- actually, today I was booking travel, so that does kind of count as work -- and man is it frustrating to be without your e-mail for even an hour or so.


And since I absolutely refuse to Tweet about my woes, I'll turn to my old-fashioned, Web 1.x outlet, a blog, to make a couple of points.


  • When neo-Luddites (or just fuddy-duddies, if that's how you care to look at it) crab about bothersome stuff like uptime and redundancy as stumbling blocks on the rush to cloud for basic, backbone services, they actually have a point. That's not to say my POP mail account hasn't gone down when I needed it, too, of course. But it's just a nice feeling to have someone who has to listen to you gripe when something critical breaks.
  • There is no such thing as free anything, of course -- Google extracts advertising revenue from Gmail, as it does with every other successful initiative it has. But, again, you get what you pay for -- Gmail is a darn useful interface, but it has been pretty buggy lately. Of course, if I don't like it, I can get my money back, I suppose ...
  • E-mail is not going anywhere as the central form of business communication.

    Add Comment      Leave a comment on this blog post
    Sep 1, 2009 10:19 AM Gergy Martin Gergy Martin  says:

    Yes, I suppose e-mail is right up there with oxygen and e-mail.  Now that's addiction.

    Sep 1, 2009 10:21 AM Gergy Martin Gergy Martin  says:

    Oops.  That was supposed to say, it's right up there with oxygen and electricity.  Embarrassing when the first comment self-destructs.


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