Yes, Tech Companies Are Hiring

Susan Hall

The big numbers cited in stories about the hiring plans at Indian outsourcers always blow me away. For instance, according to this Wharton article, the IT industry in India plans to hire 400,000 people this year, potentially its largest hiring year ever. (Though to be fair, the attrition rates at the top 10 companies was 13 to 30 percent last year.)

 

Slide Show

IT Employment Trends to Watch in 2011

Two-in-five IT employers plan to increase hiring in 2011, up 10 percent from 2010.

Another big number: In 2009, it took just five weeks to reach 200,000 layoffs at U.S. tech companies. Though the government jobs report this morning seemed positive, clearly not all those jobs will be coming back. My colleague Ann All quoted Forrester Research analyst Andrew Bartels saying:

... it "suggests that it is certainly possible that ... companies with good profits have chosen to invest in technologies that allow them to operate with fewer employees on a broad enough basis to be hurting job growth in the U.S."

Yet the rate of layoffs has slowed dramatically and Challenger Gray & Christmas CEO John Challenger just this week called the technology sector "quite strong."

 

There are tech jobs out there. We've reported on a number of companies' hiring plans for the year, so I decided to pull together some numbers. These are some of the companies that we know are hiring:

 

  • Google plans to add at least 6,000 workers globally this year.
  • Intel plans to hire 4,000, with focus on product development and R&D.
  • Microsoft has 2,400 software engineering positions open and another 400 in IT, according to FINS Technology. Forbes put the number at 1,731. (See below.)
  • Facebook-I couldn't really pin a good number on this company, but its new headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif., allows for huge expansion. There are hundreds of jobs worldwide listed on its site. And it's leading in the salary game in Silicon Valley.
  • Zynga "has more than 1,500 employees and expects to nearly double its work force this year," according to The Wall Street Journal.
  • Intuit will hire about 500 more engineers in 2011 as it grows more social, mobile and Web-based.
  • Ford, saying "We are also a technology company," plans to hire 750 product developers and engineers in the next two years.

 

Meanwhile, Forbes calls these, including Microsoft, "the tech companies hiring the most right now":

 

  • HP: 2,382 job listings
  • Lockheed Martin: 2,250 listings
  • Dell: 1,877
  • L-3 Communications: 1,778
  • CSC: 1,727
  • SAIC: 1,706
  • Northrop Grumman: 1,527
  • IBM: 1,472 listings, though it's also laying folks off. Computerworld says it could be cutting as many as 2,000 employees as it continues to move work offshore.
  • Amazon: 1,313 job listings

 

And based on a Fortune slideshow from January:

  • Accenture plans to hire 7,000 people this year in the United States and 60,000 globally.
  • Booz Allen Hamilton will add 695 people in areas such as IT as well as cyber software and systems engineering.
  • Cisco listed 595 positions, with 45 percent in engineering and design and 25 percent in services, which also call for engineers and project managers.
  • Qualcomm listed 617 engineering and business positions.

 

It's a safe bet, though, that any of the companies listed in that slideshow have some tech jobs as well. And the report from payroll processor ADP said most of the hiring activity is taking place at small- and mid-size businesses, so expect jobs there, though the numbers won't be large.

 

In addition, experts say we should expect hiring to pick up with the planned initial public offerings at LinkedIn and Pandora. "Over 90 percent of hiring at venture-backed companies occurs after they sell shares to the public, according to the most recent survey from the National Venture Capital Association and IHS Global Insight," says FINS Technology.



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