IT Salaries Slide, But Satisfaction Rises, Poll Finds

Susan Hall

The sluggish economy continued to put a damper on salaries of IT pros in 2010, according to a salary report released by Global Knowledge and Tech Republic.


The average salary slid 3.2 percent to $79,579 from $82,115 in 2009, but that's still 8 percentage points higher than the $73,900 average from the 2008 survey. More than 12,000 people globally were polled last October and November. More than 50 percent reported they received a raise, as compared with 43 percent a year earlier. At the same time, workers' satisfaction grew and they were more optimistic about the overall economy than a year ago, reports


Among the results:

  • The average raise was 7 percent, with a median of 4 percent.
  • The percentage whose pay was cut declined to 7 percent from 11 percent in 2009.
  • The percentage of respondents at least moderately satisfied on the job rose to 85 percent, from 73 percent.
  • The factors that most affect job satisfaction are salary, respect for the work performed and opportunities to improve skill sets.
  • IT workers in pharmaceuticals earned the most ($96,421), followed by aerospace/defense ($93,066), natural resources ($88,835) and IT consulting ($88,007). IT workers in government, particularly those in military and homeland security, averaged $86,808.
  • Those who felt their jobs were insecure were four times as likely to report dissatisfaction with their jobs.
  • Overall, 38 percent said they are considering a job change, but that percentage grew to 79 percent among those who reported job dissatisfaction.
  • Workers over 45, those whose pay had been cut and those whose businesses are in difficult circumstances were most likely to be job hunting.
  • Professionals who took IT or business-related training during the past year earned an average of nearly $3,400 more than those who did not.
  • More than three-fourths took some kind of training last year, compared with 66 percent a year prior.


It's not surprising that the survey found IT pros seeking out online learning, whether it be a webinar or "lunch and learn" session. However, I was surprised by the finding that older workers were among those most likely to be job hunting, considering age discrimination often rears its ugly head in obvious ways in IT. And if this Kansas City Star post is any indication, the ugliness is spreading.

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