IT Resumes: Just the Facts, Ma'am

Susan Hall
Slide Show

Thirteen Ways Your Resume Can Say 'I'm Unprofessional'

Last week I wrote about the need to put the keywords on your resume in context, not just in a list of skills or projects. Though computerized Applicant Tracking Systems look for keywords, they're becoming sophisticated enough to parse context.

 

A post on Technical-Resumes.com points out how using just a list can go wrong - and the dangers of stretching the truth. The post is by IT resume specialist Jennifer Hay, who last December wrote a guest opinion for us on C-level tech resumes. It's unlikely that job candidates at that level have to worry about about beating a computer system, but her advice serves as good warning for all.

 

Hay had a client who put MDM on his resume, then was asked in an interview which tools he used in the master data management program. The client was embarrassed to admit that his role in the project was limited to collecting metadata about his organization's master data. His work dealt with involving stakeholders and key people in the organization, no small task as my colleague Loraine Lawson has written.

 

In a situation like this, Hay advises, it's best to step back and look at what his actual role had been.


 

Yet this client could put MDM on his resume, she says, offering these examples as the best way to word it:

Part of MDM team to establish a strong foundation for moving forward. Generated interest and participation by stakeholders and Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) in the metadata-gathering process that ensured consistent and standardized data definitions across the enterprise.

OR

Generated interest and participation by stakeholders and Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) in the metadata-gathering process for an MDM program that ensured consistent and standardized data definitions across the enterprise.

By sticking to the facts, she says, you can avoid embarrassment while still highlighting your accomplishments, whatever your role.

 

And if your company is trying to make a business case for MDM, check out this collection of Master Data Management Research Notes from Ventana Research. It's free to IT Business Edge members in the IT Downloads library.



Add Comment      Leave a comment on this blog post
Oct 4, 2011 3:32 AM Christopher Bacey Christopher Bacey  says:

Good post. The second version in your example is much better grammar. It's more actively worded, feels like the action is moving forward and is   more interesting. "To establish a strong foundation for moving forward" is a bit strange if you actually, as foundations rest solidly and don't really move forward. (A moving foundation could be dangerous!).

Thanks!

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Oct 4, 2011 3:39 AM Susan Hall Susan Hall  says: in response to Christopher Bacey

Excellent point!

Reply
Dec 5, 2011 10:06 AM Mathew Mathew Mathew Mathew  says:

Yes Susan, you are right on should only write facts as at the end of the interview only that will lay your hands on the job.

I think for your later example one needs to hire a resume service provider like http://www.resumeserviceplus.com/ who can play with the words by sticking to the facts and highlighting your accomplishments. There is no harm in taking help from professionals.

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