First Job? Sweat the Preparation, Not the Interview

Susan Hall
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10 Good Ways to "Tell Me About Yourself"

Break the interview pattern and grab attention.

Google recently announced that it's changing its hiring process and will move away from the mind-bending questions it has become known for. That's got to be a relief for job seekers.

 

But that doesn't mean interviewing at Google-or any other company, for that matter-will be easy. With all the information available about companies online, you have no excuse for failing to do the research on any prospective employer. This article by security consultant Lenny Zeltser is my favorite post on the work you need to put into an interview. It sounds exhausting, but it will arm you to go in confidently and get the job. Just a note, though: He warns people that with all the information available online, you absolutely must stop this side of creepy in your research of your interviewers.

 

You'll score points if you know the "pain points" the hiring manager faces. You can then tell how your training and experience can be just what the company needs to address those.

 


I've also written about some questions you might be asked:

 

Like questions about how you've dealt with adversity, the interviewer wants to know that you've throught things through and learned something. Questions like these generally require you to tell a story-something you should definitely practice and get feedback on from your friends and family. As companies increasingly embrace collaboration and cultural fit, you also should expect some "tell me about a time" questions about your ability to work with a team, resolve issues with a difficult person or get an off-the-rails project back on track. Though students don't have an extensive work history to draw from, they can recall experiences from high school or college work or from their volunteer service.

 

Here at IT Business Edge, we have a wealth of resources to help in your job hunt. Also check out these posts:

Even College IT Students Can Write a Resume with Impact

References' Word Choice Could Hurt Your Career

Put Potential Employers Under the Microscope

Keep Your Radar up to Assess Cultural Fit

How Not to Follow Up After a Job Interview



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