For Enterprise Software Blogging, No News Is Not Always Good News

Dennis Byron

I think that there is a measurable lowering of news-release volume because of the economic downturn. That's a killer for bloggers like me because basically we comment on the news.


Hopefully it is some interesting news that you haven't previously read on the "front page" of CNet or Computerworld, such as Leo Apotheker appearing on Charlie Rose's show, or how information technology (IT) fits in the Madoff scandal. Maybe it introduces you to some hot new IT or enterprise software such as the Dutch open source company Hippo's interesting portal server, or TIBCO's new messaging appliance. A good blog post might even give you an idea that helps you run your IT shop better or make your job more enjoyable.


But in the end, blogging's still about the news.


Unless you blog about other enterprise-software-guy's blogs. But no luck there either. Bruce Richardson is bemoaning the falling share price of Citigroup. IDG says the recession could be good for the enterprise software business. Others say the recession will end the enterprise software movement (as you bail out of maintenance agreements when they expire).


When I say there is no news, I really mean to say there is not a lot of hard news: new products, new features, new functions. However, the contracting economy has revived a long-lost genre of press release: the attack press release. I know much of the competitive/comparative adversiting done in the U.S. is illegal in other countries. But at least they can't stop you from reading this article about Agresso, based on a press release the company issued. The release says Agresso is winning big over SAP. (For more about Agresso, see this recent ITBE feature article on ERP and its companion.)


I've asked for a response from SAP. If I get one, that will be news. If I were SAP's PR guy, I would get with the spirit of attack PR and answer "Agress-who?"

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