Mozilla's Thunderbird to Fly the Coop?

Lora Bentley

Mozilla may be moving away from its Thunderbird e-mail program to focus entirely on the Firefox browser, PCWorld.com says. In a blog post on Wednesday, Mozilla Corp. CEO Mitchell Baker asked for the community's input as to whether a separate organization should be created to support Thunderbird -- because Mozilla's efforts to develop the open source e-mail application are "dwarfed" by the resources behind Firefox.

Baker set out three possible courses of action:

  1. Create a separate non-profit for Thunderbird that is "analogous" to the Mozilla Foundation.
  2. Create a Thunderbird-specific subsidiary of the existing foundation.
  3. Release Thunderbird as a community project and allow community members to create an independent non-profit for user support.

The third option, he warned, would be "extremely difficult," according to the PCWorld.com story. Nevertheless, that's the option that Thunderbird cofounders Scott MacGregor and David Bienvenu would prefer.

 

Stay tuned. We'll see what develops.



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Add Comment      Leave a comment on this blog post

Jul 31, 2007 2:18 AM ted stanko ted stanko  says:
I would LIKE to see Thunderbird as its own entity.It needs more development work done.I think option 2 above would be a better choice. Reply
Aug 1, 2007 12:32 PM Michael Michael  says:
I agree. I think option 2 would have been best. It didn't happen though so we are stuck with number 3. It opens up some good possibilities as long as this project doesn't stall as so many others have. Reply

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