Is India Not So Innovative, After All?

Ann All

Last month I wrote about speculation, fueled by a report from consulting company Zinnov, that the next epicenter of innovation just might be located in India. According to Zinnov, there are a quarter of a million Indian engineers involved with R&D activities, a number second only to California's Silicon Valley.

 

But is India really a hotbed of innovation? Not so much, say some experts, including Forrester Research analyst Sudin Apte and Vinay Deshpande, a developer of the Simputer, a handheld computer designed in India. Even though tech companies like to tout their R&D investments in India, most see the country primarily as "a limitless source of bulk staffing," according to a Forrester report. Apte says many companies pay Indian workers on a "time and materials" basis, which illustrates the kind of tasks they typically perform, often product testing and maintenance.

 

Deshpande tells InfoWorld:

The situation is a lot better than it was some years ago, but most Indian operations of multinational companies are still far away from defining and architecting products.

The article quotes an unnamed software engineer working for a multinational company as saying he (or she) and coworkers do not think out or architect new products in India. "We get to do the coding for new products, and are mainly involved in maintenance or making improvements to legacy products."

 

Could some of the fault lie with India's education system? In my July interview with Sridhar Vembu, CEO of AdventNet, developer of the Zoho suite of online applications, he told me that India's colleges are "highly regimented" compared to the U.S. and other countries. Vembu speaks with the voice of experience, having attended universities in both India and the U.S. He said:

Rote learning is more common than any kind of creative thinking. So when you recruit college graduates, you often get people with good grades but not a lot of creative thinking skills. You hear about India's IT prowess, but I'd argue that it happens in spite of the education system in India not because of it.

Despite India's struggle to be seen as more than a supplier of inexpensive labor, companies such as Cisco are making some pretty major investments in the country. As I wrote in July, one-fifth of Cisco's global executives will be based at its newly established Globalization Centre East in Bangalore by 2012. Under the aegis of its Global Talent Acceleration Program, the company also plans to open a regional training center in India by the end of this year.


 

A few companies, notably Intel, are doing product development in India, notes the InfoWorld article.



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Sep 20, 2008 4:10 AM Sunil Malhotra Sunil Malhotra  says:
Very interesting debate and the pattern is so obvious!The pattern is the problem. I say something >> make it credible by adding a few names to tell you that it's not just my opinion >> people who agree will compliment me >> those that don't will confront me >> others will jump in to bring in their disjointed viewpoints >> I go on to write my next post.Guys, it's innovation we're talking about here. Does anybody care to explain what the word means? Does it need a context? Is it a process or a domain - or both? Or many other things coming together?Talk to technology and business people and they will somehow try to see it as a tool. So researching a need and then developing a solution to address it is Innovation. Right? That's what I get from reading the post. Then why call it innovation, why not keep calling it R&D? Are we simply using the word because it sounds nicer?Is one thing called Education responsible for lack of Innovation thinking or is it just one part of the jigsaw? Of course, education is a key enabler for societal progress and therefore without the right philosophies, methods and tools, we're not going anywhere.It's not about India being innovative, it's about Indians being innovative. I believe we are innovative and perhaps the only nation that has all the ingredients needed for innovation. Of course, this means expanding the definition - oops! almost fell into the same trap myself there - (understanding is a better word) understanding of Innovation. Reply
Sep 20, 2008 6:17 AM Sunil Malhotra Sunil Malhotra  says:
Mr. Deshpande, credited above with the Simputer, looked at solving a social 'problem' in India and other developing nations. I can agree that there was innovation in the 'way' he arrived at a possible solution but he remains an 'inventor'. We must see the distinction between innovation and invention, so we do not irresponsibly continue to use the words interchangeably. Reply
Sep 22, 2008 1:26 AM Guy Carpenter Guy Carpenter  says:
Slavery is slavery called with any name. Limitless source of bulk staffing is a more polite way to say India and Indians are good as slaves and not innovators. See the English and other Europeans with regards to Africa and South America. If innovation is dependent on people who worship deities and gods who are gross and whose priests would not bless a dead child beacuse her family was of a lower cast, then we should all close shop and move to an other planet. Reply
Sep 22, 2008 2:12 AM David Comma David Comma  says:
It's a waste of time and probably worse trying to find chinks in India's armor when we should be focused on fixing our *own* large problems.We need to spend time looking at our schools, higher education instititutions, and how families pay for education.Let's work to get more students trained as engineers and scientists here in the US, and not have the families neck-debt in debt. That will get us the critical mass we need to drive innovation worldwide as we did so well in the last 50 years. Reply
Sep 22, 2008 2:23 AM Jim from Atlanta Jim from Atlanta  says:
I am a exective software architect with 25+ years of experience designing and implementing large complex custom solutions. Solution innovation was a major differentiator during the 80's and early 90's. Software technologies changed at a much faster rate during that time than today. Stanadaridized software development practices and methods such as patterns limits developer creativity. Creativity seems to be measured by how effective and efficient software can be re-used. Patterns have been created for almost everything including software and infrastructure. Standardized methods and process have proven to reduce overall implementation time and cost. Innovative requires additional time, costs, and it introduces risk. Companies looking to lead market swill incur those costs. Unfortunately, most companies follow the crowd which reduces the need for innovation. Reply
Sep 22, 2008 2:49 AM Global Survivor Global Survivor  says:
Let time spent on blogs like there will give you more time to spend on innovation or is that too simplistic?? Got to go...have an economy to help recover.... Reply
Sep 22, 2008 3:21 AM Emily Emily  says:
Indians are NOT innovative. Just mention any indian who has attended ASSEMBLY, for example, or in any animation cartoon or in any GOOD PRODUCT, have you ever seen a 14-charachter name?. The only thing they are innovative or creative for is on cheating. Another area of expertise in their innovation path is on inventing EXCUSES for not delivering on time or with quality. They are masters of innovation for NOT answering straight questions, oh yeah. I lived 4 years in India working for important IT consultancy company (part of a group who owns almost all India) and they were REALLY number one on giving so creative and innovative talking but delivering N O T H I N G but lies. Reply
Sep 22, 2008 3:28 AM Charles Charles  says:
It is apparent that several people are generalizing the entire "Indian Population" or "Indians" in general....this is nothing but a guise.....for racismIndia as a country is very innovative and self reliant given all the short comings... Reply
Sep 22, 2008 3:33 AM Sree Kumar Sree Kumar  says:
Why American Companies are sending the manufacturing jobs to China and outsourcing jobs to India and other countries?The answer is greedy CEO's who wants to make millions and we are Wal-Mart Shoppers. Reply
Sep 22, 2008 5:09 AM Frits Bos Frits Bos  says:
Please, let's keep "racism" out of the dialog and focus on "frustration" that is equally important on both sides of the ocean, and neither has anything to do with what the dialog on "innovation" was supposed to be about.If you look at the comments, it is easy to blame others, whereas innovation is something that comes entirely from within. That makes it extra frustrating because it is impossible to blame the lack of innovation on others (even though that might be very tempting). Walmart (and others) low price guarantee is not a form of slavery because it does not FORCE anyone to sell at low prices. At least the benefits are shared, even with the source country where jobs are created that never existed there before. Let's be honest: how many North Americans are purchasing home-made cars or electronics on principle to keep jobs at home? That is why outsourcing is going to be a fact of life.Innovation, excluding piracy and reverse engineering, creates new opportunities. It makes no sense that you downplay inventors: it is a necessary start provided the idea is incubated and supported. Sharing manufacturing effort with lower-wage countries that honor copyrights and patents is one way to develop a global economy that can eventually consumer greater volumes of product. It is important for everyone to identify what skills they can market locally, rather than to assume jobs will last indefinitely. That too is innovation, and the "inventor" may simply market his/her own skills locally to benefit.What may simply be observed here is that India for one does not have the incubators (venture capitalists, etc.) that are a prerequisite to taking ideas to a commercial level. Perhaps that is related to education: the pursuit of short-term goals like pumping out COBOL programmers right before the Y2K crises even though that might not be a lasting career opportunity. However, we should be careful not to judge from a perspective that is alien to people in other areas of the world: if you want to stop outsourcing you had better figure out how to do that work more effectively with local talent. I know that IT will swing back to local talent because, regardless of the talent and qualifications of developers in India, they are at a disadvantage with respect to stakeholder contact for example. There are many other such examples that are evidence of outsourcing companies at a disadvantage, so naturally the bulk of the outsourcing work is focused on process work where innovation is frowned upon (would you want each car to have unique, spur of the moment introduced customizations?).So, innovation is dependent on opportunity, and beware of mixing the lack of opportunity with a generic quality assessment of the people behind that perception (which is different from the general observation that the region as a whole does not initiate much innovation: the thesis of the article if I am not mistaken). Reply
Sep 22, 2008 12:20 PM Sastry Dhara Sastry Dhara  says:
India is the land of past glory. The modern number system originated in India. The ultimate in abstract thinking -- invention of "zero" -- originated in India.After the British conquest of India, perhaps even before then, the innovation in Indian thought took a severe drubbing. India scrambled to survive in the wake of all the invasions and subjugation by foreign powers for over 700 years.India's strength is in efficient execution. That is why so many multi-nationals set up shop in India. Its strength is not yet in creative innovation. That is the reason why there is no Google or Apple from India. Given time, India will get there. Let us be patient. Reply
Sep 22, 2008 12:24 PM William Halverson William Halverson  says:
This is the classical tension between teaching methods as opposed to encouraging vision. All good musicians or artists first learn basic techniques before they move on to original 'creative' endevors. So to with physicists or engineers. India is producing trained practicioners; the creativity will naturally follow. Sadly, my country (USA) can't even produce enough trained practicioners anymore, leading American companies to continue the brain drain to feed our industries. This global trend sill reverse soon, as Chinese and Indians realize their own markets are big enough to apply their skills At which point what's left of the American dream machine will implode. Reply
Sep 22, 2008 12:35 PM frits bos frits bos  says:
Wow: talk about missing the boat. Whether the issue is losing your job to an Indian outsourcer (a decision that is made at home no less) or being hired to do routine work for that foreign company (they want cheap talent, and Indian companies are falling over each other to deliver that), innovation has nothing to do with either.Innovation is observing a need or a deficiency or a new opportunity that nobody else has yet perceived. With a massive smog problem, and an emerging need for cars in a world with rising gas prices, innovation would be for car manufacturers in India to come up with vehicles that use alternative energy (What about a car roof made of solar-panels for example? They might not become such best-sellers in Canada, but I am sure there would be a market for that closer to the equater in dense population centers). The purpose of this example is simply that you cannot look to outsiders for innovation: you need to find those opportunities in your own backyard and then, when you have created the next best mousetrap, there might be an opportunity out there.For those stuck in the "cheap labor trap" on either side of the globe, remember that the final results count. If it works, India deserves to succeed, but then they cannot afford to increase wages and remain competitive. It the results are dismal (for reasons of geographic distance) then the cost definition was too narrowly defined. That calls for innovation, which in this case might be a good opportunity for Cisco if they don't manage to waste their knowledge assets before they can see the light.As for a British rule induced lack of ability to innovate, please explain North America or Australia or other parts of the world that either suffered or benefited from that influence. The saying goes: if you have lemons then make lemonade. If the original infrastructure of your railroads is never upgraded, do you blame that also on British rule? Innovation depends on stopping the blame game and looking at barriers as opportunities to change things for the better. Education is never the vehicle for innovation: it is what you do with it that makes all the difference. ;) Reply
Sep 22, 2008 12:43 PM jai jai  says:
As one who studied in India and the US, I feel the gap lies in undergrad education (unmotivated profs, huge gap between top 10 and the rest) but more so in the grad school system. Indian professors do no reseacrh or publication. Little or no money goes into research. Indian grad students are basically seen as losers who couldn't find a job. The same UG students, you will note, fuel US IT innovation after the exhilarating experience of a US grad school. US grad school and research system is the crown jewel of US knowledge economy.Besides this look no further than the death of BSc/PhD pure science and Math curricula to understand why hard problems are not even outsourced to India but to eastern europe. BSc students come out with pathetic level of knowledge. Reply
Sep 23, 2008 1:51 AM Ann All Ann All  says:
SRJ,Due to some technical weirdness, the comment you reference wasdeleted. It was written by Ann All, not the other Anne listed as the author. (And no, we still don't know how that happened, as the comment came from our IP address!) I made the point that when customers continued to stress cost savings above all else, Indian services providers have little incentive to offer their clients more than that. I hope the situation is changing, as you describe. But I believe that many references to wanting more transformative capabilities from providers are little more than lip service. Reply
Sep 23, 2008 3:06 AM Guy Carpenter Guy Carpenter  says:
think I will go and buy a Tata automobile in my 70's (now in 40's) take out a life insurance, obtain the highest possible amounts of credit and once all of this is in place, I will drive the Tata automobile and have my family enjoy the insurance payout! Reply
Sep 23, 2008 9:44 AM Dr.V.Thanikachalam Dr.V.Thanikachalam  says:
Dear Dr Sanjay Suri,We think learning in life long!Please visit "www.nitttrc.ac.in".We conduct about 150 programs to improve the competencies of the faculty of technical institutes.About 5000 faculty members undergo training every year in the following areas:1.Curriculum evaluation,revision,and improvement.2.Instructional materials development to meet the needs of the industry specific flexible curriculum3.Instructional design and delivery for engineering faculty4.Content updating in science,engineering and technology5.Instructional media development6.Leadership development7.Educational administration and management8.Institutional development9.Creation of centres of excellence10.Continuous process development in instructional planning11.Examination reforms12.Internal revenue generation and utilization13.Impact study,tracer study,continuing education planning and development.14.Planning for market driven cooperative programs in engineering15.Soft skills16.Human resource development17. On-line programs18.Educational video production19. Multi-media learning packages20.Industry-institute -community interactionIn addition we conduct in-house programs for the faculty of engineering.We offer Ph.D program in Engineering education.So far 35 faculty members earned Ph.D degrees.We conduct the following overseas teachers and managers programs :1.Advanced certificate course in Curriculum design and instructional materials development.So far 600 members have undergone this program from 90 countries.2.Advanced certificate course in Human Resource Development.3.Advanced certificate course in microprocessor and applications.4.Advanced certificate course in Computer applications5.Advanced certificate course in Educational Video production6.Advanced certificate course in planning women technician programs7.Library automation.We also undertake development projects under World Bank,Asian Development Bank, UNDP, USAID, UNESCO, CIDA, DANIDA...through bidding and winning.The Institute is an Associated Centre for Colombo Plan Staff College,Manila ,Philippines and UNESCO's ASIAN PROGRAM FOR EDUCATIONAL INNOVATION FOR DEVELOPMENT,Bangkok,Thailand.Many of our books got international award.Dr.SANJAY,I am a Professor,Nodal officer and Course Director.I am guiding 8 Ph.D scholars and conducting courses in HRD, Management,Curriculum,Institutional development.....I published 200 papers,8 books,50 reports...Bye,Dr.V.Thanikachalam, B.E., M.Tech., Ph.D., M.S. (Instructional System Technology), FIGS, FIE,Former Post Doctoral Fellow,Indiana University, Bloomington,IN ,Member Pi Lambda Theta,Former Fulbright Scholar-Indiana UniversityProfessor , Nodal officer and HOD,National Institute of Technical Teachers Training and Research,Taramani,Chennai-600113,INDIA(drthanikachalam@yahoo.com) Reply
Sep 23, 2008 9:52 AM Dr.V.Thanikachalam Dr.V.Thanikachalam  says:
Dear Dr Sanjay Suri,We think learning in life long!Please visit "www.nitttrc.ac.in".We conduct about 150 programs to improve the competencies of the faculty of technical institutes.About 5000 faculty members undergo training every year in the following areas:1.Curriculum evaluation,revision,and improvement.2.Instructional materials development to meet the needs of the industry specific flexible curriculum3.Instructional design and delivery for engineering faculty4.Content updating in science,engineering and technology5.Instructional media development6.Leadership development7.Educational administration and management8.Institutional development9.Creation of centres of excellence10.Continuous process development in instructional planning11.Examination reforms12.Internal revenue generation and utilization13.Impact study,tracer study,continuing education planning and development.14.Planning for market driven cooperative programs in engineering15.Soft skills16.Human resource development17. On-line programs18.Educational video production19. Multi-media learning packages20.Industry-institute -community interactionIn addition we conduct in-house programs for the faculty of engineering.We offer Ph.D program in Engineering education.So far 35 faculty members earned Ph.D degrees.We conduct the following overseas teachers and managers programs :1.Advanced certificate course in Curriculum design and instructional materials development.So far 600 members have undergone this program from 90 countries.2.Advanced certificate course in Human Resource Development.3.Advanced certificate course in microprocessor and applications.4.Advanced certificate course in Computer applications5.Advanced certificate course in Educational Video production6.Advanced certificate course in planning women technician programs7.Library automation.We also undertake development projects under World Bank,Asian Development Bank, UNDP, USAID, UNESCO, CIDA, DANIDA...through bidding and winning.The Institute is an Associated Centre for Colombo Plan Staff College,Manila ,Philippines and UNESCO's ASIAN PROGRAM FOR EDUCATIONAL INNOVATION FOR DEVELOPMENT,Bangkok,Thailand.Many of our books got international award.Dr.SANJAY,I am a Professor,Nodal officer and Course Director.I am guiding 8 Ph.D scholars and conducting courses in HRD, Management,Curriculum,Institutional development.....I published 200 papers,8 books,50 reports...Bye,Dr.Vedhathiri Thanikachalam, B.E., M.Tech., Ph.D., M.S. (Instructional System Technology), FIGS, FIE,Former Post Doctoral Fellow,Indiana University, Bloomington,IN ,Member Pi Lambda Theta,Former Fulbright Scholar-Indiana UniversityProfessor , Nodal officer and HOD,National Institute of Technical Teachers Training and Research,Taramani,Chennai-600113,INDIA(drthanikachalam@yahoo.com) Reply
Sep 23, 2008 10:07 AM SRJ SRJ  says:
A very interesting debate indeed! I want to add a couple of my thoughts:1. Strategy and approach to Indian IT outsourcing of North American and European companies is significantly different from the IT outsourcers of Indian heritage. For the former, it IS a fact that Indian captives are treated like menial labour. Given to do low-end, repetitive and un-innovative work. This clearly suppresses innovation and creativity. However, it is IMPORTANT to note that IT outsourcers of Indian heritage MUST innovate constantly and invest in a significant amount of R&D just to keep up with global leaders in outsourcing such as IBM, EDS, Accenture. Therefore one sees a significantly different approach and strategy towards innovation and strategy in these Indian IT outsourcers.2. Leaving IT outsourcing aside, did you folks know that a significant amount of graphic production work for well-known animation houses such as Dreamworks / Pixar and Disney is actually done in outsourced graphic shops across India and the Far East! If you Google enough, you will find out the amount of work outsourced for movies like Shrek. If that is not innovation and creativity then I dont know what is.3. Moving on to another industry sector Automotive companies like Volvo, Ford, GM, all have significant components of their new and latest passenger vehicles developed in by Indian engineering companies. I know for a fact that some of Volvos 2009 dashboards have been designed by Indian engineering company.4. On another point, I am a strong proponent of learning by rote in the formative years. I think kids in elementary and middle school need to learn by rote the fundamentals of the 3Rs. It is ONLY on the base of these fundamentals can creativity, innovation and free thinking build strong, purposeful and amazing ideas. Therefore creativity comes a bit later during high school, college and university.Id love to hear more comments on these points. Reply
Sep 23, 2008 11:44 AM SRJ SRJ  says:
Anne, Your point "When a clients emphasis is on cost control above all else, there is little encouragement for providers to offer value-adds like creativity and innovative thinking. " was true sometime ago.However, things are changing, mere cost arbitrage is not enough or the only raison d'etre for outsourcing. In today's situation CIOs and CFOs are looking at much more over-and-above cost to award outsourcing contracts. These are in the area of innovation, business transformation and value-added capabilities from service providers that go way beyond just the cost benefits. However, your point is still valid for captive outsourcing units of North American and European companies whose strategy is to retain IP, creativity and innovation "close to home" and outsource grunt-work, repetitive, low creativity work. THIS is what causes a huge difference in the style of operations, the work ethic and investment behind innovation and R&D between captive outsourcing units and offshore heritage companies. Reply
Sep 24, 2008 3:04 AM Sree Kumar Sree Kumar  says:
I read the comments by Emily. (Comment by Emily September 22, 2008 at 3:21 pm )The facts she mentioned is not true.Just check the reality with Walt Disney & PIXAR.Part of their well known animated movies were developed in India by Indian Software Companies.HP has more than 50,000+ people working in India, Microsoft has the second largest Campus in India, Cisco has a big presence in India and now they are opening a big researh facility that is only second to US Campus in India. All the big US Technology Companies has presence in India.India is only 61 years old Vs US with 400+ years. What India gained during the 61 years is great. There are good and bad people in every society. Major US Technology Companies has R& D Centers in India because they can hire highly educated and talented people there. Reply
Sep 24, 2008 8:57 AM Sree Kumar Sree Kumar  says:
'India, China will lead the world with innovations'Wednesday, September 24, 2008. Boston: Rising economic powers India and China have been surprising the world by their quickest economic growth and other achievements. These two Asian nations hold tremendous potential as centers of innovation - a fact that has escaped the attention of the rest of the world, says Ravi Ramamurti, Director of the Center for Emerging Markets at Northeastern University's College of Business Administration.A report Indus Business Journal cited him saying, "China and India are already well-recognized as centers of production of low-cost goods and services for the world. But their potential as centers of research and development and innovation is only starting to be recognized. They will fuel global innovation in at least four ways."Though India and China already are centers of innovation, they were known for making cheap-priced goods. Many Westerners still perceive India as a global hub for services like information technology, and China as a low-cost producer of consumer goods that ultimately wind up on store shelves in the United States. But the stage is set to do away with this impression, he adds.According to Ramamurti, the rise of India and China as hubs for research-and-development activities will drive innovation in other parts of the world in the following four ways: Firstly, Western companies already recognize that both countries have an abundant supply of highly skilled, low-cost workers. And American firms, in particular, are eager to establish research-and-development operations in India and China in order to access this talent. A huge talent pool in India will help accelerate product development by these firms.Secondly, India and China will fuel a new kind of innovation aimed at adapting existing Western technologies and products for low-income customers, an approach that Ramamurti calls "affordability innovation".These countries will also produce new business models catering to their middle-class citizens. Local companies are likely to lead this process because they are uninhibited by prior investments in technology and organization, as Western firms are. A great example of this is the Indian telecom firm, Bharti Airtel, which made huge profits despite charging one to two cents per minute for wireless calls.Finally, the two countries will contribute new products and services, based on cutting-edge technologies, to the world market. Reply
Sep 24, 2008 12:11 PM Sree Kumar Sree Kumar  says:
If Guy Carpenter wants to give a gift to his family by purchasing a big insurance policy & a Tata Automobile when he reach 70's, then he will be disappointed.Honda Accord made in USA is the only car which is 100% made in USA. All others use components made in other countries including India.Tata sold millions of automobiles and they are better than some of the cars sold in USA.Tata Motors, the first company from Indias engineering sector to be listed in the New York Stock Exchange (September 2004), has also emerged as an international automobile company. Through subsidiaries and associate companies, Tata Motors has operations in the UK, South Korea, Thailand and Spain. Among them is Jaguar Land Rover, a business comprising the two iconic British brands that was acquired in 2008. In 2004, it acquired the Daewoo Commercial Vehicles Company, South Koreas second largest truck maker. The rechristened Tata Daewoo Commercial Vehicles Company has launched several new products in the Korean market, while also exporting these products to several international markets. Today two-thirds of heavy commercial vehicle exports out of South Korea are from Tata Daewoo. In 2005, Tata Motors acquired a 21% stake in Hispano Carrocera, a reputed Spanish bus and coach manufacturer, with an option to acquire the remaining stake as well. Hispanos presence is being expanded in other markets. In 2006, it formed a joint venture with the Brazil-based Marcopolo, a global leader in body-building for buses and coaches to manufacture fully-built buses and coaches for India and select international markets. In 2006, Tata Motors entered into joint venture with Thonburi Automotive Assembly Plant Company of Thailand to manufacture and market the companys pickup vehicles in Thailand. The new plant of Tata Motors (Thailand) has begun production of the Xenon pickup truck, with the Xenon having been launched in Thailand at the Bangkok Motor Show 2008. Tata Motors is also expanding its international footprint, established through exports since 1961. The companys commercial and passenger vehicles are already being marketed in several countries in Europe, Africa, the Middle East, South East Asia, South Asia and South America. It has franchisee/joint venture assembly operations in Malaysia, Kenya, Bangladesh, Ukraine, Russia and Senegal. Reply
Sep 25, 2008 1:06 AM Vedhathiri.T Vedhathiri.T  says:
Need for Creativity:Now to meet the global challenges in human capital,the goals of Indian Technical Education have changed.The NBO accreditation has become compulsory.India has become an observer in ABET Inc.Hence,the focus will be on innovation, creativity, research ,product development,diffusion and adoption.The changes introduced in projuct works,dissertation,thesis,action research will be yielding results.The best students' projects are awarded national prizes. In due course these will impact on the innovative products. Reply
Sep 27, 2008 9:44 AM Guy Carpenter Guy Carpenter  says:
There is a big reference to Northeastern University some Indian saing something to an Indian publication, in the comments above. Anyone knows Northeastern University is a scholl-for-hire and of questionable quality at most.This is how Indian firms and most Indians (there are some notable ones, but these are not native Indians - their birth and raising is outside of India) try to establish themselves, through -deception, -low-quality establishements beign bought and then publishing/saying big things about India and Indians-corruption (of which an example is above)-copycats and no regard for IP- etc. etc., Reply
Dec 2, 2010 9:29 AM gbilios gbilios  says: in response to Sree Kumar

does india have a global brand that everyone buys? where is your operating system?

india is a service hub..not technological geniuses.  how well did the 2010 dehli  commonwealth games go? did india live up to its promise that it be the best ever event in the universe?? you india wanted to showcase the most expensive second tier event in the history of mankind with collapsing venues and airborne diseases you think you outpaced china's 2008 olympic games?? china finished the 2008 olympic games 2 years before the opening ceremonies?? whats you excuse india?? not enough skilled engineers to build infrastructure and you have to get children to do the work? india is a service hub..not an innovative powerhouse..the americans give you their technology and then you reproduce it at 1/5th of the cost.. apple shut down their R&D support centre in bangalore because wages were going up!!  not to forget quark express the biggest IT software development project screwed by india developers..there is a lot of evidence of projects failing in india..you build something - collapses the next day..you program something - crashes the server for a week.. you come for education and end up applying for permanent residency to get out of the shit-hole you created. 

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Dec 2, 2010 9:41 AM gbilios gbilios  says: in response to Sree Kumar

India is only 61 years old Vs  US with 400+ years???? india is only 61 years old?? and america is 400 ? you are 61 years old and you still can't tie you own shoe laces!!!

america is a pioneer of engineering genius and technological superiority..barrack Obama just signed an agreement to sell india american military hardware..america sends billions of its federal reserves to india..what can india do independently without help? none..except for making excuses..2/3rds of india is garbage wasteland and 2/3rds of india's population live in poverty.

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