Collaboration Software Can Help Information Hoarders

Ann All

Though reality TV is a guilty pleasure of mine, I can hardly stand to watch "Hoarders," the A&E series about folks whose homes are crammed to the rafters with stuff, much of it things most of us would consider junk and toss out without a second thought. As the website says:

For some, throwing away even the tiniest thing -- a sponge, a button, an empty box -- is so painful that they will not be able to allow the cleaning to be completed, no matter the consequences. For others, professional help and an organizer's guidance give them the strength to recover.

My husband and I have the sad task of helping to clean out the cramped house of a deceased family member who could have been on the show. We've filled 30 boxes with books, with no end in sight. A number of the books were duplicates. My suspicion: The large volume of books made it tough for this family member to realize she already owned books or to put her hands on copies she knew she had. The same pattern seemed to show up elsewhere. She had a dozen soup ladles, for instance, squirreled away in some pretty odd places.


Buying a replacement for something you can't find in a cluttered house is a more common problem for many of us -- including me -- than we'd like to admit. (Let's just say my son has more than one but fewer than 10 pairs of swim goggles.) Many organizations have the same problem, with both internal information and customer-facing information. There's the same feeling of being overwhelmed and of knowing that some of your practices just make the problem worse.


IT Business Edge's Loraine Lawson wrote a great post earlier this week describing Best Buy's use of semantic technology to address the issue of customer-facing data and to make its website more useful to customers. The problem of disorganized internal information is an even tougher nut to crack, I think. Master data management, a topic Loraine regularly writes about, offers promise in helping organizations deal wiith their internal data but is neither easy nor inexpensive.


Collaboration software can offer a less-complicated and less-costly fix to finding certain kinds of internal data, as Booz Allen Hamilton's Walton Smith makes clear on a short video on the Enterprise Irregulars blog, discussing the company's, which sounds like a sort of intranet on steroids using collaboration tools such as blogs, forums, profiles, wikis and social bookmarking.


The portal won the Open Enterprise Innovation Award at the 2009 Enterprise 2.0 Conference. Reinforcing the ideas that, as Smith says on the video, "Enterprise 2.0 is not easy" and is "a continuous process," BAH has continued to tweak the functionality, adding new partners including MindTouch. RedMonk analyst Michael Cote chats with Smith and MindTouch CEO Aaron Fulkerson on the video.


Cote hits the nail on the head when he describes BAH as a company that's "not only geographically dispersed but experience dispersed." It has 23,000 employees, more than half of them not based in BAH offices. The company is growing at a rapid clip. Some 40 percent of the work force have been with BAH less than two years, and the company plans to add 5,000 workers this year. Most of the hires won't work out of BAH's headquarters in metro Washington, D.C.


BAH realized, says Smith, "we need to get them the tools they need to be successful." Like most knowledge workers, consultants need to "find the right information at the right time to meet the client's needs." Unfortunately, that's pretty tough using Microsoft Outlook, which Smith calls "the de facto collaboration tool within most organizations." He says:

It's not searchable. It's not scalable. But it's what we have.

In contrast, says Smith, helps employees easily determine whom they need to contact to get the information they need. It's cut down tremendously on what Smith calls the "do you know" e-mails, blanket messages sent out to try to determine which colleagues can help solve a problem. Folks are "one thousand times more likely to respond" if they get a specific e-mail or call addressed to them rather than a blanket message, Smith says. is searchable, it's scalable, and it organizes information contained in existing BAH systems from an employee perspective rather than an IT perspective.


Just like hoarders, most organizations have the information they need if only they could find it. As Smith notes, existing systems organize information in a technology-centric way not a people-centric one. Hello.bah.cim incorporates existing information (Peoplesoft profiles, etc.) so it's a "dynamic part" of employee profiles. The benefits BAH gains from this transparency sound similar to those enjoyed by Capgemini with its use of the Yammer microblogging platform.


BAH's experience with is also helping it win interest from some of its government agency clients, many of whom have "the same problems we had," says Smith. As MindTouch's Fulkerson says, BAH can help them "understand the gaps between their existing collaborative processes and where they want to go." Many organizations appreciate working with vendors that "eat their own dog food" as IT Business Edge contributor Rob Enderle wrote last week in a post about HP's converged data center infrastructure.

Add Comment      Leave a comment on this blog post
Jul 8, 2010 4:38 AM Allen Bonde Allen Bonde  says:

Hi Ann - really interesting topic, which is sounding a lot like the return of 'big bang' knowledge management - with a social twist!

There are some pretty cool companies working around the 'edge' of this problem, from Baynote with their social search and CI approach (see my blog:, to NetBase with their semantic driven insight tools for marketing, health and science communities.  Both worth a look.


Jul 19, 2010 1:51 AM Lynn Lynn  says:

I recently implemented a collaboration tool ...DRE Software's BCN (Business Collaboration Network) which I have found to be a very powerful and user friendly tool that enables our sales and marketing teams to collaborate with current customers, prospects and our partners in our secure, personalized work space. I quickly realized we had more uses for the tool then originally planned once we started using it compared to the tools we were using. The BCN filled this void by allowing us to create discussion forums for prospects, customers and in special circumstances we put them together to enhance the sale, the virtual whiteboards and file libraries and messaging with internal team members, customers and prospects. We all now have better and clearer insight into customer relationships so we can forecast future revenue with better precision. We set it up in about 10 minutes and started using it immediately compared to the long and difficult implementations I have found with other tools.

Our business partners love it because it's a great way to keep them up to date with a library of up to date resources and it has enhanced communication on the deals we are working on. Our teams are able to work together as a Team what a concept. In other words we keep finding more ways to use the BCN since our free trial. That's right they gave us a free trial! Worth a try .... and sets up fast! They recently added the ability to customize our spaces allowing our users to create personally branded spaces. Later this summer they also plan to add web conferencing capabilities which will be a big cost savings for us along with the benefit of having the tools all in one place.

Oct 7, 2010 4:12 AM Steven Steven  says:

Check out this website for a Business collaboration software

tool we implemented to help us drive revenue DRE Software. It's a business collaboration and web conferencing all in one tool. This company really seems to get what it takes to Engage prospects, customers and business partners and build a relationship with our company using private workspaces.

We needed a supplement to our CRM solution, and DRE Software is one of the few technologies we have found that adds direct value to the client/prospect. Which in turns has driven revenue. It's affordable and has saved us money on our

web conferencing budget. In the current economy how many business tools can you say that about.

With all the information available for sales, internal resources and the contacts along with email integration the decision to use this service was an easy one.

We did not have to download any software and it is very easy to use and customize your workspaces.

The information is shared by everyone invited to the workspace keeping everyone on the same page.

This is a smart buy for anyone in sales!

Nov 25, 2011 7:12 AM nathalie nathalie  says:

Hi, I liked your article that goes from makeover show glam to dry corporate.   I actually gasped in disbelief when I thought I read that your son had 10 pairs of goggles but then read it properly.  (I swim too). 

The company I work for has less than 23 people let alone 23000 like Booze AL Ham but we do use collaborative software which we got quite recently.   My boss was really keen on BAsecamp and all set to get it but made us have a look at some of the other options around, for instance RTM, Toodledo, 5pm and a handful of others.  We got Dooster.  It has completely tidied us up.  More in the communications sense of the phrase as we had been missing meetings due to an increase amazingly in business but the messups were becoming awkward.   Dooster didn't take long to install and thank goodness for me the customer service is good because I hate new software.   Security is good too.  The  collaborative packages seemed pretty much the same  to me when we were researching and I think they're a really good thing.  My boss chose Dooster because he liked the price.  I'm just glad he's got it because office relations had really been getting uncomfortable and that problem amongst others has been eliminated with Dooster.  



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