MongoDB Upgrade Rises to Enterprise Scale

Mike Vizard
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Six Trends Shaping the Data Center in 2015

A major upgrade to the open source MongoDB document database released this week adds a new storage engine option along with support for a MongoDB Ops Manager tool designed to make it simpler to manage multiple instances of MongoDB at scale.

Kelly Stirman, director of products for MongoDB, says MongoDB 3.0 makes use of a storage engine that MongoDB gained when it acquired WiredTiger late last year. Stirman says MongoDB is giving IT organizations the option of using the current storage engine, the WiredTiger storage engine or a new in-memory storage engine.

Most IT organizations, says Stirman, will most likely wind up using the WiredTiger engine because it provides levels of compression that reduce storage requirements by as much as 80 percent over the existing MongoDB storage engine. But there are instances where, because of application compatibility issues, IT organizations will want to continue using the existing MongoDB storage engine. There are also instances where, because of performance, IT organizations will want a MongoDB storage engine that runs in memory, says Stirman.

Data Management

Fresh off of raising another $80 million in financing, MongoDB is beginning to distance itself as one of the most widely used NoSQL databases. With that increased popularity, of course, comes management challenges. Stirman says that as usage of MongoDB has increased, IT organizations have been asking for a tool such as MongoDB Ops Manager to help them manage the lifecycle of data stored on MongoDB. This management platform, says Stirman, includes an application programming interface (API) through which it can be integrated with a wide variety of other management frameworks.

With over nine million downloads and 2,000 customers, the MongoDB database is clearly emerging as a database force to be reckoned with in the enterprise. Not as clear is just how many instances of MongoDB are being used in place of another database or simply are being deployed in support of applications that otherwise would never have been built in the first place.




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