15 Time-Management Tips for Stressed-Out IT Pros

Don Tennant

It’s almost certainly no surprise to anyone reading this that IT pros work crazy hours. According to a recent Spiceworks survey on IT staffing, that craziness equates to 52 hours a week. When you consider that that’s almost a full month more on the job than what people with a sane 40-hour work week are used to, it’s no wonder that IT pros deal with a lot of stress.

We can all probably agree that a good way to help alleviate that stress is to develop better time management skills and habits. Jackie Gaines, an executive coach, time management consultant, and author of, “Wait a Hot Minute! How to Manage Your Life with the Minutes You Have,” has come up with a list of 15 tips that are worth considering. Check these out:

Prioritize sleep so you can function when you're awake. If you do nothing else, prioritize your sleep needs. You will be more productive and feel more ambitious when you get the rest your body requires. Schedule sleep like any other daily activity on your to-do list. Pencil in a stopping point in your day and stick to it without fail. Then wind down with a book or another relaxing bedtime ritual to help you drift off to sleep.

Establish what the "workday" means to you and your boss. It's common for employers to call or e-mail you after hours, but it is up to you to decide whether you're available after hours. If you choose to be off-duty on nights and weekends, that is your choice (and your right). Just make sure you respectfully address your "workday" limits with your boss upfront, so everyone is clear on the boundaries.

Don't stay on your e-mail all day. Constantly checking your inbox is distracting and slows you down. Designate a few times in your workday to check e-mail so that you remain in control of your schedule and aren't being reactive to new messages as they appear.

Choose human connection over technology. Though technology has improved our lives, it comes with its own set of problems. E-mails and texts are convenient, but they create room for confusion and miscommunication. Whenever possible, talk in person in order to get your message across clearly.

Learn to say no and mean it. It's okay to turn down invitations, cancel plans, or disconnect from the outside world every now and then. Saying no is a skill that will benefit you throughout life, so allow yourself to politely start bowing out of unnecessary commitments right now.

Set achievable goals each day. Even the most thoughtfully constructed to-do list will be useless if it is too ambitious. What's the point of writing down unachievable tasks? We're not superheroes and shouldn't try to be. Make your daily goals small enough that you can actually get them done. Remember that you can always do more if you have the time.

Give multitasking the ax. Multitasking is ineffective and counterproductive. People work best when they give focused attention to the task at hand. So aim to work on only one project at a time and give yourself permission to forget about other priorities until you are done.

Listen up! Active listening consists of being present and engaged when communicating with another person, but it's not as easy as it sounds. It's very common to forget to listen after you speak your thoughts in a conversation, and you often lose important info as a result. When you are talking with a coworker, manager, or anyone else, be sure that you turn off that pesky inner monologue and focus when it is the other person's turn to speak.

Don't be a sheep. While maintaining the status quo is often a good thing (especially at work), there may come a time when it is advisable to stop following the herd and innovate in the name of productivity. If you can envision a way to work smarter and better, you may just create new best practices for your place of work that will save time and increase quality.

Stop shuffling papers. Most of us waste a lot of time shuffling papers from one pile to another. Chances are your desk is full of paper you don't know what to do with. Stop this maddening cycle by touching each sheet of paper just once and figuring out the appropriate action. Either put it in a to-do pile so you can deal with it immediately, a file (for documents you must keep), or the trash. This keeps the papers moving and keeps you sane.

Step away from the Internet. Surfing the Web is a huge time waster for most people. An innocent little break often turns into an hour (or more) of wasted time that you can't get back — especially when you should be working or headed to bed to get some rest. Shut off access to the Internet at a certain time each day to avoid getting lost in cyberspace. Also, take breaks from recreational Internet use — about a month — to focus on other aspects of your life that may need attention.

Have some fun along the way. It's important to remember that stressed-out people aren't all that productive. You have to relax and schedule "recharge time" into your life to avoid burnout — especially if you have an intense work environment. Be sure to build in time for fun on the weekends and on some evenings, but try to make work fun, too. If appropriate at your office, find ways to infuse a little lighthearted play into your workday.

Practice breathing and mindfulness. Imagine how productive you could be if you could focus, calm all anxious thoughts, and truly be present. You can find out by practicing mindfulness. Breathing is a tool for achieving a relaxed, clear state of mind. There are multiple methods for achieving this state, including tai chi, meditation, yoga, or simple breathing exercises. Find one that resonates for you and practice it daily.

Stop owning other people's stuff. How often do you hear yourself saying, "Never mind, I'll do it myself?" Probably more often than you'd like, and this habit takes up your precious minutes in no time. The solution is to hold others accountable for their responsibilities. This includes your children, your spouse, and your colleagues. Let "never mind..." be the exception instead of the rule.

Let go and delegate. Learn to know when to let someone else handle a task. It can be hard to relinquish control, but it is also necessary to delegate, especially if you're in a leadership position. Remember that delegating is not admitting you can't handle your responsibilities — not at all. Rather, it's about maximizing the potential of your entire work force.

A contributing writer on IT management and career topics with IT Business Edge since 2009, Don Tennant began his technology journalism career in 1990 in Hong Kong, where he served as editor of the Hong Kong edition of Computerworld. After returning to the U.S. in 2000, he became Editor in Chief of the U.S. edition of Computerworld, and later assumed the editorial directorship of Computerworld and InfoWorld. Don was presented with the 2007 Timothy White Award for Editorial Integrity by American Business Media, and he is a recipient of the Jesse H. Neal National Business Journalism Award for editorial excellence in news coverage. Follow him on Twitter @dontennant.

Add Comment      Leave a comment on this blog post
Aug 24, 2016 8:32 AM Dave T Dave T  says:
Totally agreed... You have provided several important tips here and ones that I like is the planning (workday) stuff, step away from internet and have some fun. Doesn't mean that the rest are not good, but as an IT professional for more than a decade, these points impress me. Most of the IT pros dont organize or plan the day's tasks and time, which is exactly why they are not able to complete their tasks in time. A simple project management or time tracking tool would do the job here. Having fun, why not, right now... More in this field for several years, most of my time went on solving issues and opening and closing tickets :) But now I do not have to do all this. Using an IT management tool would help you solve all this. Internet do eat a lot of your time, I didn't know this until I started to track my time. I had spent a lot of my day's time on internet, mostly checking and replying to emails and catching up with friends. But now my time is streamlined, both officially and personally. Thanks to Vorex - http://www.vorex.com/ Plan your day, track your time, do not over use internet and ultimately have some fun... :) Reply
Sep 21, 2016 6:42 AM gene shuman gene shuman  says:
Many of these efficiency/time management articles merely restate obvious points, but this is a good list. The first five items are especially useful. Reply

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